(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Antioch News 04/19/1996"

QQP j Lakeland Newspapers Welcomes 116 NEW Subscribers This Wee 




LiJ 




BLT 
707 N . M u in Slfii^t- 



HM 



AH07S? 12/77/96 
flHTIOCIl TUUMSHIP LHWV 
757 UAH! STREET 
ftntiocli 



KKC-7 



IL 60002 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



O1906-A Schroodor Publlcallon 



VOL. 1 10 NO. 16 Antink-AftmOCH APRIL 19, 1996 



.__ ^m.WH'-'l'J 



-/ z. rnvji:3 



50 CENTS 






a 







~m.%teL 



THIS WEEK 



COUNTY 



Education 
reform passes 

Schools could get 
additional revenue 
next fall PAGE Bl 



LAKELIFE 



Go green for 
Earth Day 

Forest Preserve, Round 
Lake Park District 
plan activities 
PAGEEtf 




BUSINESS 






Making 
their own 

Fladander's brewpub to 
offer taste of Midwest 
PAGE CI 




INDEX 



Business CI 

ClASSifiEd ...C5 

County News Bl 

GtosswORd . B20 

EdiTORiAl/OpiNiON B4 

CREEN'Up.... Bl 1 

HEAlrtwATch B'6 

Horoscope B20 

HotSpots ..B14 

Ukelife B9 

LEqAlNoTiCES....A14&C4 

LipSERViCE C25 

MoviES B19 

ObiTUARiES C5 

wkel DeaIs.. C9 

Younq Child ...PuII-Out 




ASSOCIATION 




Fire department changes guard 



Chief Carney to bid 
adieu after 35 years 



KEVIN HANRAHAN \ 

Staff Reporter 

About 35 years ago former Antioch Fire 
Chief Edgar Simonsen yelled across the 
neighborhood to an impressionable 
William Carney, then 21, as he was cutting 
his lawn. 

"I was just married, cutting my grass 
when he yelled at me to go down to the 
station and take out an application to 
become a fireman," recalled Carney, 
referring to Simonsen. "*We need young 
people,' he said." 

After 35 years of being a volunteer 
fireman — the last nine of those years he 

was 

the chief volunteer— Carney will be storing 

See CARNEY page AIO 




a 






1*1 



* ■ 






i j$£& 






Deputy Chief Dennis Volling, left, will take over the reins of the Antioch Fire 
Department when Chief William Carney, right, retires April 30. 



New fire chief Volling brings 30 years of experience 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 

Staff Reporter 

New Antioch Fire Chief Dennis Volling 
may have pretty big boots to fill, but the 
veteran volunteer firefighter walks with pretty 
big boots himself. . _— . ■" 

Upon the announcement that Fire Chief 
William Carney was handing in his helmet 
after 35 years with the department including 
the last nine years as chief, it was not difficult 
to find Carney's replacement. 

Deputy Chief Volling will assume the title 
as fire chief effective May 1. 

Over the last 30 years, Volling's 
progression into chief was almost natural as 
he ascended up the ranks from a volunteer to 
captain, to assistant fire engineer, to chief 
engineer, to divemaster and to assistant 
chief. 

"I know I have some pretty big shoes to 
fill," Volling admitted to village board 
trustees who ; approved Volling's 
appointment as chief. 

Volling's hu;mllity was in reference to 
Carney's nine-year tenure and to legendary 
chief Todd Maplethorpc's 21-year reign. 



"It's not going to be hard for him to fill 
any shoes," said outgoing chief Carney, 
noting Volling's 30 years of experience. 

While Carney's tenure may be known for 
upgrading the equipment and the vehicles of 
the department which make It one of the best 
equipped departments in Lake County, 
Volling quickly sees his role as overseeing the 



full-time firefighters with benefits as well, 
meaning more money and more taxes. 

Last year, the fire department dished out 
a total of $64,000 to pay its 50 volunteers who 
responded to more than 500 calls. In 
comparison, $64,000 would only pay for a 
fireman and a half on a full-time basis. 

He also sees the possible merging of the 
fire department and the Antioch Rescue 



'It's not going tO be hard for Squad, which is also volunteer 



(Volling) to fill any shoes/ 

— Chief William Carney 

completion of two new fire substations and 
possibly a third. 

Keeping up with the population growth 
will be his main concern, he said. And growth 
has trickle effects ranging from more fire 
stations, more equipment, and more 
volunteers. 

Volling cringes when he notes, "Within 
the next 10 years, you're going to see a full- 
time chief." 

Not that a full-time chief is bad in itself, 
but it foretells of the possible need to hire 




Can-do attitude about recycling 

Amy Matheny arid Elizabeth Austin from the Chicago Caia Theatre explain to an 
assembly of children at Antioch Lower Grade School that if you bury these cans, 
they will still be there in 100 years.— Photo by Linda Chapman 



Nevertheless, Volling plans to lead the 
department as it looks to build two new 
stations. 

The fire district just purchased a 2-acre 
site on Grass Lake Road just west of Route 59. 
It is also working out a deal to land a site on 
Deep Lake Road near Depot Street to serve 
the growing eastern part of the district. 

Volling also said property for a third 
substation may be purchased in the Channel 
Lake area. 

. Wim Abbott Laboratories expanding its 
faciliUes near Route 45 and Route 173, Volling 
also sees additional equipment needs. 

c J^l,«i UtUre ' ' soc -a ladder truck 
See VOLLING page A10 

Zoning board 

gives approval 
to Tiffany Farms 

KEVIN HANRAHAN 

Staff Reporter 

In the face of a room filled with residents 
wrestling with concerns about density, the 
Antioch Planning and Zoning Commission 
approved the controversial Tiffany Farms 
development 

The village board later postponed voting 
on the proposal until May 6. 

Michael Cason, representing builder 
United Homes of Illinois, said the number of 
units have been reduced from 440 single- 
family units to 414 lots on approximately 169 
acres at the comer of Tiffany Road and North 
Avenue. 

As the development is currently zoned, 
Cason noted there could be up to 532 units. 
He also said he agreed to eliminate the 
multiple-family zoning on the property 
which could have allowed more than 700 
units there. 
See TIFFANY page A10 



■ i 






I- 
1 



"■-»■>»-■-,.. ■ . | 






' n 



COMMUNITY UkElANd Newspapers Ap«U 1 % 199& 




K 



/ 



155 S. Sayton Rd. • Fox Lake 

(847) 587-7711 

Serving Northern BMinois 
for Over 35 Years 

Fences • Pools 

Patio • Spas 

• Chemicals 



mm. L: 



r: 



'-** ^-^>' 



ia^STSil 



c^Pl 



3'.' 



LSUfci 



®© 



t-'-TTj (i2£> 



mmw r 



.33 f'i M 



^tJl.il^iLj'vAcil'a 



Our summer hours start 
Thursday, April 18th 

For your convenience... 

Mon. thru Thurs. 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. 
Sat. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 



Family Owned 
& Operated 



. : I. -, h. ; rCi.' i: iiri t v'lVt'i'.' • — ■ 





Moa-Thur. 
Fri. 
Sat. 
Sun. 



10-6 
10-6 
10-5 
11-4 



Health Scare? 

Urgent Care 



jer*s serves Lake Villa since 1927 

ErTinger's True Value Hardware has been serving residents of Lake Villa and the 
surrounding area for 69 years, ever since it opened in 1927, 

Mike Effinger, a lifelong resident of the area, walks across the street from his home 
every morning to the hardware store, located at 122 E. Grand Ave. which was found- 
ed by his grandfather and taken over by his rather in 1960. 

Six years ago, Mike took over the family business which started as True Value V&S. 
His wife Deborah, who works for Baxter Labs, works in the store part time. 

"I've worked here ever since I can remember" says Mike, whose knowledge of the 
home and garden products he carries is well known. 

For customers who prefer to deal with someone they know, the Effingers and their 
two daughters, Sarah, 13 and Katie, 8 have been active in their community, with Mike 
ready to celebrate 20 years on the Lake Villa Fire Department, where he is a captain. 

Effinger's True Value carries a complete line of quality lawn and garden products, 
but it is the friendly personalized service that is the Effinger masthead. Right now 

Effingers is having a springtime sale with fertilizer, rakes, shovels and garden seed 
specially priced. 

Effinger's, which carries everything from power mowers to power tools and offers 
mower repair, is open for its customers' convenience seven days a week; from 8 a.m. 
to S p jn. and on Sunday from 9 a.m. to noon. 

Effinger's Tm.® Value Kar^waofe 

122 E. Grand Ave., Lake Villa 



.. ■ u 



- 



(Prime Cemetery Location) 

Cemetery Road and Washington Street that is. 
That's where you'll find Gumee's newest state- 
of-the-art Urgent Care Center. There, 
emergency room physicians can treat or 
stabilize nearty any condition or injury — dog 
bites to earaches to broken bones. So if you have 
a health scare and can't get in to see your 
doctor — don't worry. All you have 
to remember is one thing. .. 

URGENT CARE- 
WE'RE THERE! 

Open 8 AM to 
8 PM Daily 

For Urgent Care 

in Lake Villa; 

visit STATS at 

37809 N. Rt59. 

847-356-6600. 




Urgent Care Center 




Saiin ThLTL'si; 
Mctlkal C "run" 



Coupon good for a free first aid kit when 
you visit the Gurnee Urgent Care Center 
through October 15th. Ho service is needed. 
Duplicates not accepted. 




dlJl \\,i<liiii<:iiiii sunt Mine ~\ 



847.263.1100 



lili ( .in ( I'rpir.iumi 

u.llliiuii. MKHI 



2p_ 



Phon e i ) 

LNHS4 



H 



April 1 9, 1996 UI(EJANd NtwspApERS COWMUNrfYJ 




Antioch chamber, CAN 
expected to merge 



Village officials and experts survey a wetland area along Sequoit Creek which the village plans to 
restore as a park. From left, Claude LeMere, John Larsen of Applied Ecological Services, Art Jackson 
of Centegra, Gail Bamgarner of Centegra and Mayor Marilyn Shineflug.— Photo by Kevin Hanrahan 

Centegra tells concept for medical site 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 

Staff Reporter 

Conceptual plans for phase 
one of the Centegra Health 
System medical office building 
complex are ready to go before 
the village review process. 

As the parent organization 
foV Northern Illinois Medical 
Center in McHcnry, Centegra 
Health System purchased the 
6 .l^adre ^rnrncrclal parccPbn 
the corner of Skid mo re Drive 
and Parle Avenue with the hopes 
of developing the property into 
a complex of medical offices. 

Centegra officials have 
revealed a draft concept they 
hope to build behind downtown 
Antioch. 

The first phase will include an 
8,400-squarc-foot building which 
will include physician offices for 
primary care doctors and other 
specialists such as chiropractors, 
foot doctors, and family doctors. 

"We are looking at ancillary 
services that would make sense to 



put in that area and that Antioch 
needs," noted Gail Bumgarner, 
vice president of network devel- 
opment. 

"There would be a variety of 
services we're looking at," she 
added. 

The first phase would include 
parking for 42 cars. Eventually, 
there will be parking for 228 cars 
when the entire complex is com- 
plete - './ - v.- 

Phase two of the concept 
would include adding 10,200 
square feet to the first building. A 
33,000-squarc-foot second build- 
ing would be added in the future. 

Both buildings are planned to 
be single story. 



KEVIN HANRAHAN Through its various fund-rais- 

Staff Reporter ing activities, CAN helped fund in 

A resounding vote of affirma- part various beautlfication pro- 

tion is anticipated next week as jects and the downtown market 

the memberships of the Antioch study, and it looks to participate 

Chamber of Commerce and with the development of the cast 

Industry and Antioch side of downtown where a 7-acre 

Community Action Now Inc. vote park is being planned as well as 

whether to merge together. the Centegra Health System med- 

For the past five years, CAN leal office complex, 
has served as a separate non* CAN will essentially become a 

profit organization dedicated to committee of the chamber, and 

the development and maintc- the CAN committee will have a 

nance of the vitality and spirit of minimum of two representatives 

Antloch's downtown business on the chamber's board of dircc- 

district tors. Hyerdall still expects CAN to 

The chamber serves to meet monthly as a committee. 

Improve the business and social Office position will be dcter- 

cnvlronment of the greater mined at a later time, and CAN's 

Antioch community, funds will be under its own com- 

Thc presidents of both orga- mittce budget 
nizations welcome the consolida- "We're all working for one 

tion of resources and pooling of goal and that's the betterment of 

manpower. Antioch," noted chamber 

"There are only strengths and President Ed Cimaglio. 
benefits to all those concerned," He said CAN would retain its 

said James Hyerdall, president of autonomy as a chamber commit- 
CAN. tee. 

CAN would offer the chamber "Nothing will really be 

the expertise behind improving changed. The CAN committee 
downtown specifically, while will run the same way as it did 
CAN would have the support of a before," Cimaglio said. "It will be 
Centegra "officials said they na ^^ yre 1 ^^f, d „?J imbcrof a co- existence wit everyo 
did not expect to participate with 
the village's desire to develop the 
adjacent7-acre parcel Into a wet- 
land restoration park with a 



bandshelL 

"Our cooperation Is develop- 
ing that site into something 
advantageous for the communi- 
ty. We think it is very compatible 
for both projects to be back 
tfieri;"' BiiSfgarher said. 

According to wetland delin- 
eation maps, the parking for the 
health complex appears to be in 
wetlands although the buildings 
will not be in wetlands. 

Centegra officials hope to break 
ground by the caiiy summer with 



commerce, Hyerdall said. 

"It will allow us to have a pool 
of manpower for some of our 
projects that we were not fortu- 
nate enough to have before," 
Hyerdall pointed out Most of the 
40 members of CAN arc also 
members of the' 220 -member 
chamber of commerce. 



working for a community goal." 
CAN members will vote on 

the consolidation during a meet- 
ing April 24 at 7:30 am. at the 
First National Bank of Antioch. 
Chamber members will vote on 
the merge during a meeting April 
25 at noon at J.Ts Uoadhouse 
Restaurant 



Village has eyes set on 
another industrial park 



Village takes first steps in 
restoring new park site 



KEVIN HANR AHAN 

Staff Reporter 



to other locations to make way for 
new housing developments. 

John Larsen of Applied 



Lakeland J"®* 

NewBp^em 027-080) 

Antioch News-Reporter 

Founded 1886 

Ottic* of Publication: 30 South Whitney St, 
Qrayttaka, IL 60030. Phono (709)223-8161 . 

Published w*eWy, second class postage paid ot 
Qrayslak0.IL 60030. 

Mall Subscription Rales: $24. 60 Par Year by Mall 
paid in advance in Lake, Cook, Kanotha and 
McHaniy Counties; aliawttara $35.00 Per Year 
by Mai paid In advance. 

Postmaster: Sand address changes to Anlbch 
Newt-Raporler, 30 South Whitney Street, P.O. 
Box 268, Grayslaka, llinoia 6003a • 

(847)223-8161 

Gumee Press 

Round Lake Naws 

Wauconda Leader 

Ibortyville News 

UndenhunstNewa 

Warren-Newport Press 



Arrfech NawvRoporter 
Lake Zurich Enterprise 
Lake Vila Record 
Murrdeleh News 

Graytfato Tines 
Fox Lake Press 



Wetland markers arc in place as 
village officials began the initial Ecological Services said the pahV 
stages of restoring Sequoit Creek site is currently an eyesore which 



into a park behind downtown. 

Although the U.S. Army Corps 
of Engineers had to postpone their 
visit to the seven-acre site east of 
Skidmore Drive, an ecological engi- 
neer and village officials began 



has become a dumping ground. 

"All the park is in a highly dis- 
turbed wetland," said Larsen, who 
surveyed the possible wetlands on 
the site. 

He said restoring the site could 



delineating the wetland boundaries attract the return of native plant life 
around the proposed park site. and wildlife that once flourished 

As envisioned by Community along Sequoit Creek. The wood- 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 

Staff Reporter 

Village officials are not saying 
exactly where yet, but the village 
hopes to land a major industrial 
park for the village on Route 173. 

While there are a number of 
housing projects under construc- 
tion or in the planning stages 
going on in the village, Mayor 
Marilyn Shineflug also noted that 
the village is actively seeking new 
business developments as well. 

She told members of the 
Antioch Rotary Club the village 
currently has its eyes set on a site 
that is between 50 to 70 acres 
along Route 173. 

"I can't disclose what we're 
looking at, but it will be about 50 
to 70 acres for light industry," she 
said. 

The village unveiled last 



Shineflug said village officials 
are working with Wisconsin 
Central officials in order to make 
the railroad more accessible for 
prospective business to utilize 
the tracks to load and unload 
goods. 

"We're talking to Wisconsin 
Central to make the tracks more 
marketable for business," 
Shineflug said. She also hopes 
Wisconsin Central would 
improve some of the crossings in 
the area. 

Shineflug also pointed out 
£rL° nC u CW busin <*s has 
l^acr y e P ^ haSed3 - 5acrcsofa 
Rour; n, dUStrial P«* *«* 
£££ ^ and north °f North 
Avenue The small industrial 
eel is kown 
Property. 

The mayor said the three 
month its plans to annex about industrial parks are measures the 



as the 



par- 
Packard 



l Vernon His News 

M.R. SCHROEDER 
Founder-1904-1986 

WILLIAM H. SCHROEDER 

Pubishor/Presktent 

WILLIAM M. SCHROEDER 

General Manager 

ESTHER DECKER HEBBARD 
ROSELLELOVE UIMIKOOB 
NANCY UURHELL KAREN 0T00LE 

Cbafsi/tdrsrMv M? Oahkn Up, 

RHONDA HETRrCK BURKE 

EdkrfeChtf 



Development Director Claude 
LeMere, the park aims to be a wet- 
lands restoration project for educa- 
tional purposes and serve as a com- 
munity park for large events such as 
carnivals, the Taste of Antioch and 
other open-air attractions. 

The Army Corps of Engineers is 



lands could also be Improved. 

"The main goal Is to create a 
habitat, so we can attract water foul 
and wildlife to the area," Larsen 
said. 

In addition to serving as a wet- 
land restoration project, two ponds 
will be created to be used for ice 



expected to assist the village in skating purposes. 

restoring the area. A massive clean-up day is being 

This is certainly a positive pro- planned for Saturday, Apr. 21, 

ject for them, and we appreciate beginning at 8 am LeMere wcl- 

their cooperation," LeMere said. comes all Interested volunteers and 

The Army Corps often has the organizations to lend a hand in 

dubious task of mitigating wetlands cleaning the site. 

Waterfalls offers line dancing 

Beginning April 18, Waterfalls Restaurant will be offering coun- 
try-western line dancing every Thursday evening from 7:30 to 
10:30 p.m. Louise Butterbaugh will be the DJ and instructor for the 
evening. Some new line dances will be taught in addition to the 
open dance time. Admission Is $5. For more Information, call 395- 
2212. 

)• \ > i n i i ■: fl * i :» i i i :::::*!!: i'i J i 



37 acres on Route 83 south of 
Grirnm Road and north of Loon 
Lake. The industrial park would 
have access off of Route 83 across 
from Beach Grove Road. It 
extends east of the Wisconsin 
Central Railroad tracks to the 
Northern Illinois Conservation 
Club's wildlife refuge and prairie 
site. 



village is taking to bring more 
business to town, to Increase tax 
sales receipts and to add new 
property to the tax rolls. 

"We're trying to add new rev- 
enue without adding students to 
the local school districts," said 
Shineflug, comparing housing 
developments versus business 
developments. 



Municipalities join for auction 



The Obenauf Auction Service of 
Inglesldc will be holding its second 
municipal equipment auction In 
back of the Fox Lake Village Hall 
this weekend. 

On April 20, a number of cars, 
trucks and tractors will be auc- 
tioned off as well as office equip- 
ment, kids bikes and yard equip- 
ment on consignment from over 10 
area municipalities from both 



McHenry and Lake counties. 

Inspection of items will be at 10 
am. to 4 p.m., April 19, and the 
event itself will start at 10 am with 
inspection at 9 am. 

Last year over 200 people 
attended the auction in Fox Lake. 

For more information, call 
Obenauf Auction Service at (847) 
587-2095. 
— byTlNALSWIECa 



[ 

i 

. 
v 



:4 



* 



I - 




COMMUNITY UkElANd Newspapers Ap«il 19, 1996 



t> 






■ i 



■ 



I 



J 



Oakland jumps rope for healthy hearts 



KEVINLHANRAHAN 

Staff Reporter 

Oakland School second- and 
third-graders learned that jump- 
ing rope Is not only a healthy 
exercise, but they could raise 
money for a good cause at the 
same time. 

More than 200 second- and 
third-graders participated in the 
Jump Rope for Heart program, 
sponsored by the American 
Health Association. 

For die American Heart 
Association it was the lflth year 
for the annual Jump Rope event, 
but it marked the first year that 
Oakland School participated in 
the event. 

In its first year, the second 
and third graders garnered more 
than $1,700 in pledges after 
jumping rope during their gym 
classes. 

"This was a good way to start 
the program here," noted 
Principal James Licnhardt. "I was 
amazed at how much was 
pledged and that it was just our 
second- and third-graders." 

Jump Rope for Heart is a pro- 
gram designed to teach students 
about the benefits of regular 
exercise while promoting team- 
work and building school spirit 
The event aims to promote 
healthy lifestyles including prop- 
er nutrition, exercise, not smok- 
ing and controlling high blood 
pressure. 

"The kids had fun, and the 
money went to a good cause for 
the heart association," Lienhardt 
said. 

The event at Oakland was 
spearheaded by physical educa- 
tion teacher Dave Johnson. 
Licnhardt credited Johnson with 
getting the program started at 

State Bank of 
Lakes offers 
scholarships 

A small pot of tuition gold is 
ready for the taking for Antioch 
Community High School gradu- 
ating seniors. 

The State Bank of the Lakes 
will offer it annual scholarship to 
ACHS seniors wishing to attend 
the College of Lake County. 

The scholarship fully pays for 
tuition and books for two years. 
Applications will be available at 
the bank and the high school. 

Teachers will eventually 
select worthy students with good 
grades, financial needs and com- 
munity service to compete for the 
full-ride scholarship. 

In addition, the bank will offer 
the Edwin Miles Memorial 
Scholarship for the final time. 
Miles was chairman of the bank 
board of trustees from 1904 to 
1993. 

Scholarship applications 
must be submitted by May 1. For 
more information about the 
scholarships, call the bank at 395- 
7790. 



rWmTE Usi 

Lakeland Newspapers wants 
to hear news of local sport- 
ing events, clubs, organiza- 
tions, etc. Black and white 
photos are also welcome. 
Please send news items to 
Claudia M. Lenart 30 S. 
Whitney, Grayslake, 60030 
or call 223-81 61. 



Oakland School. 

Monies raised through the 
Jump Rope for Heart support 
local research and educational 
programs to fight heart disease 
and stroke, one of the country's 



leading causes of death. 

"Hopefully, the students will 
become life-long learners about 
keeping healthy and staying in 
good shape through exercise," 
Licnhardt said. 




Alyssa Johnson, 8, jump ropes for the American Heart 
Association during gym class at Oakland School.— Photo by Linda 
Chapman 



BIG HIT 

of the WEEK 



FDW 







6 MONTH CD 



$1000 minimum opening balance 



■ -.-'-*■■>■ * /■.-.- :-■:>;- ■ ■ 



SEE YOUR HOMETOWN TEAM 



■ . 



■-** *.f.*v4WMW»M*MM jaW " 



Members Of The Northern States Financial Group 



,-FIRST FEDERAL BANK, fsb 



Waukegan 

Madison at County Street 1 48 Lewis Ave 
(847)623-0084 (847)249-6307 



BANK OF WAUKEGAN 



Gurnee 

5384 Grand Ave. 



(847)249-6312 



Waukegan 

1601 N.Lewis 
(847) 244-6000 

Antioch 

Rte. 59 at Grass Lake Rd. 



Green Bay Rd 

At Grand Ave. 

(847) 244-6000 



(847) 395-6822 



'Annual Percentage Yield (A.P.Y.) Is effective dale ol publication and subject to change without notice. Penalty may 
be Imposed for early withdrawal. Fees may reduce the earnings on the account. 



r-School BmeFs 



St. PETER SCHOOL 

Elections to be held 

On April 27 and 20, St. Peter adult parishioners or parents of 
school children will vote for two new school board members to 
serve three-year terms, Election of school board members will 
take place after 5:30 p.m. Mass on April 27 and after all Masses 
on April 20. Absentee ballots arc available In the school office. 
Candidates include Laura Conlcy, Dr. Daniel Doarini, and 
Lynncttc Hamlin Amcnt. Election results will be announced 
May 5. 

EMMONS SCHOOL 

Students give STAR performance 

Students STARS showing performance, improvement and 
effort for the month of March were Megan O'Connor In kinder- 
garten, Ben Koutny and J.D. Turzy in first grade, Katie Worswick 
in second grade, Robert Reynolds and Tanya Felts in third 
grade, I leather Kearney in fourth grade, and Jay and Matt Barrc 
in fifth grade. 

Students gain Spotlight 

As part of the Middle School Spotlight program, the folowing 
students were recognized for their performance, improvement 
and effort Ryan LcFavc, performance; Tiffany Divis, effort; 
Rodolfo Dclatorre, effort; and Kevin Podstawa, effort 

ANTIOCH COMMUNITY HIGH SCHOOL 

Spring play debuts 'All American' 

A little bit of the comedic screen writer Mel Brooks will 
come to Antioch Community High School when the spring 
musical "All American" hits the stage April 26-20. Musical 
drama portrays an immigrant professor who uses his engineer- 
ing background to coach football. Admission to the spring play 
is $2 for students and $3 for adults. For more information, call 
395-1421, 



BILLER PRESS 

"We're Your Type" 

FAST, TURNAROUND 

TIME! 



Hours: 
Monday thru Friday 
8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
Sat. 6 a.m. -12 p.m. 



(847)395-4111 

(847)395-1203 

Fax (847) 395-4232 



CKMOST. 





MX 
SOCC 



966 Victoria • Antioch 



When you noed il "yesterday* caO us today. 

COMPLETE PRINTING 4 DUPLICATING SERVICES 

•O&W Photocopies -ON Printing •Typeset! ng & Design 

•Enlargements k Reductions ^oflaltoc/Bircfntfkilding 




$m*&4$Rm* 



"Want SidMt dwund". Qd 3ht Hal 'Shot at £y<wj S. %«/ 

NEW '96 FORD 

WINDSTAR 



. FORD 



LINCOLN 



MERCURY 




3.8L SPI Eng., 7 Passenger, Light Group, Auto., Air, Power Windows, 

Locks & Mirrors, Cruise, Rear Defrost, AM/FM Stereo Cassette, 

Luggage Rack, Remote Entry, Privacy Glass, Floor Mats. 



$ 



BUY FOR 




• ]*, 



20 387 en $ 3 19 1 



er mo. 

or 36 
mos." 



'Add lax, title, lie. & S40 doc. lee. " Based on 36 mo. closed-end lease w/approved credit. I si mo payment $320 sec. 

its/ft ' 



dep., plus tax, tillc, lie. & $40 doc. lee. due at lease signing. Tolal Paymenls/Pufcliase Option: 511,484/513,653. 15.000 

mis pefyr.1 If per mile over. 

(ttl COHVENIENTLY LOCATED 
SE HABLA ESPANQL 



feNw 



FORD '■• 19NCOW ^HKORf^OffTOIWaW 

On Rt. 173 Just East of Rt. 83 Antioch IL 847-395-3900 



I 



Ap»iM9, 1996 UkflANd NewspApcRs COMMUNITY | 




I 



Firefighters battle massive field fire ^PoliCE BEAT 

At least 80 acres of 
damage suspected 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 



Staff Reporter 

It took nearly 80 firefighters 
from nine different departments 
more than 6 hours to battle a 
massive swamp fire between 
Lake Marie and Grass Lake. 

Smoke was reportedly seen 
from miles away as the blaze on 
April 1 1 blackened approximately 
80 acres of wetlands on a penin- 
sula that separates Grass Lake ' 
and Lake Marie. 

A cause of the fire has not 
been determined yet 

"It was a long one and it was a 
lot of acreage, " noted Lieutenant 
Lee Shannon. 

The first call came in at 5:12 
p.m., and firefighters did not 
return to the station until 11:30 
p.m. 

Drug bust from 
mistaken identity 

A case of mistaken Identity lead 
to the largest drug bust in 
Grayslakc's history. Gages Lake res- 
ident Richard E. Warren, 39, was 
discovered to have in his posses- 
sion cocaine with a street value of 
$12,000 April 12. He was appre- 
hended on Route 45, near the Farm 
Bureau, during a traffic stop in 
which his car was mistakenly Iden- 
tified. 

He said the officer pulled over 
Warren's car because It matched a 
description of a vehicle involved in 
a robbery, but the officer noticed 
drug paraphernalia including 
butane torches used to smoke 
crack-cocaine, in the back scat of 
the vehicle. 

"He (the officer) got permission 
to search the vehicle and discov- 
ered 119 grams, or 4 ounces of 
cocaine, with a $12,000 street 
value," said McCutchcorL 
Warren was arrested and charged 
with one count of possession and 
one count with the intent to deliver. 

Warren was released from the 
county jail on a $50,000 recog- 
nizance bond. 



Shannon happened to be 
assisting with a field fire In Lake 
Zurich near Gilmer and Fairfield • 
roads when he saw bellows of 
smoke rising 25 miles away In the 
Antioch area. 

"When we were coming back 
from the Lake Zurich fire, we 
could see it," Shannon noted. 

Eventually, nine different fire 
departments battled the flames 
including Trevor, Wilmot, Silver 
Lake and Randall departments in 
Wisconsin as well as the Spring 
Grove, Fox Lake, Round Lake and 
Newport fire departments in Lake 
County. Shannon estimated 
about no firefighters on the scene. 

Four firemen were transport- 
ed to local hospitals and treated 
for exhaustion. Two firefighters 
from Trevor were released from 
Victory Memorial Hospital in 
Waukegan, one Spring Grove fire- 
man was released from the 
Northern Illinois Medical Center 
in McHcnry and an Antioch fire- 
man was released from. St. 
Therese Medical Center in 
Waukegan. 

"Everybody took a beating on 
this one. It was a long fire," 
explained Shannon. "Anytime 
you go into swamp conditions 
you have rough terrain to deal 
with." 

Strong winds apparently blew 
the fire due north toward Route 
173, but firefighters set a "back 



a 



^"^^^ 



•A qournm coffu skoppi And hduay 

748-4600 

♦ FResh $MA Pastwes 

♦^ Cll5T0M DJECORATEd CaI(E5 

♦ HANd MidE CIiocoIates 

♦ EspREsso/CoffcE Bar 

♦ Gifr BAskETS 

♦ Gift CERTlficATES 

♦> Gourmet SANdwiches 
MacJe To 0r(1er 

♦ Hot, Hearty Soups 

Crltck OUT OUR NEW/ly 

ExpANcW saIa(J seIection 
♦ OpEN EarIx 7 DAys ♦ 

HeId WantecI 7 DAyriME 

...» . 

^S ShoppE 



£v 



*****+ Co-fcc*** ' 



»*-*! 



bum" to spare the homes just 
south of Route 173. Shannon said 
a fire is set to burn an area and 
then extinguished so the main 
fire halts at the area already 
burned. 

"We set a back burn so the fire 
does not go any further," 
Shannon pointed out. 

Field fires were rampant 
throughout the state late last 
week when the temperatures 
soared in the 70-dcgrce range 
and strong winds prevailed. 
Shannon said weekend rains 
should temporarily prevent field 
fires for the immediate time 
being. 

Although he said the cause of 
the fire has not been determined, 
fire officials suspect the cause to 
be from wind-blown sparks from 
lawn fires. 

Shannon warned homeown- 
ers to check with their local fire 
departments before doing their 
spring cleaning with any open 
burning. Sparks from lawn fires 
often blow into dry open fields, 
he said. 

The Village of Antioch pro- 
hibits all open burning, while in 
unincorporated Antioch open 
burning is prohibited unless a 
permit has been issued. 

"Generally, there is no open 
burning without a permit from a 
local fire department," Shannon 
warned. 



Persons charged with a crime are innocent until proven guilty in a 

court of law. 

ArVTIOCH 

ACHS student causes problems 

Police were called to Antioch Community High School April 1 1 
to Intervene with a student who had been disruptive in class. Police 
arrested Eric Slay, 17, of Lindcnhurst, for disorderly conduct 
According to reports, Slay was disrupting dass and using profani- 
ties. The instructor feared Slay would become physical and called 
for police intervention. Police said Slay admitted to using profani- 
ties and said he was "attempting to get suspended from school." 
After being charged with disordcriy conduct, Slay was released on 
recognizance bond and will appear in Grayslake court May 8. 

Shoplifter caught with whiskey 

On April 13, police responded to Armanetti liquor where a 
shoplifter was being detained by a store manager. The employ- 
ee told police Todd Allcr, 20, of Lindcnhurst, removed a bottle 
from the shelves and put it in his jacket. The employee said 
Aller walked past the checkouts without paying for the bottle. A 
$1 1.99 bottle of Gentleman Jack whiskey was concealed in his 
jacket Police charged Aller with theft under $300. Aller told 
police he has a "drinking a problem" which prompted the theft. 
He was released after posting $75 cash bond and will appear in 
Grayslake court May 8. 

Driver crosses centerline 

Police arested Kimberly Stafford, 40, of Antioch, for driving 
under the influence. According to reports, police observed 
Stafford on April 14 cross the centerline on Route 59, on Bowles 
road, on Hillsodc Avenue and on Route 173. She also ran off the 
roadway on Rte. 59 and on Bowles Rd. and was speding 54 mph 
in a 40 mph zone, police reported. She refused a breath test 
and was released on recognizance bond. She will appear in 
Waukegan court May 14. 



r 



IT Wf\5 A BEAUTIFUL, 
SUNNY W WHEN 
A BIRD FLEW UP AMP 
T0U> ME THAT A 

HOME EQUITY lOAN 

FROM 

State Bank of The Lakes 
c0uu> solve all of my 

PROBLEMS. 

AT FIRST I THOUGHT 
HE WANTED A BITE 
OF MY LUNCH." 




/ 



The bird is right - this gentleman can use a HOME EQUITY LOAN 

from State Bank of The Lakes, and so can you! 

Remodeling - Fences - Decks - Screened Porches 
Debt Consolidation - College Tuition 

Auto Purchase 



No Application Fee - No Title Search Fee - No Appraisal Fee 

*imiim;rv:ti. iwi; 



It's easy. 
Meet with a member or our Consumer Lending Department 

or give them a call at (847) 395-2700 to And out more details. 




State Bank of The Lakes t 



FDIC 

INSURED 



;^_ 



. 




COMMUNITY LftltfUnd Newspapehs Apuil 1», 1996 






The things we do for memories 



Most people get sentimental 
about new babies, weddings, 
perhaps even a new house, but 
the Old Retired Line Dancin' 
Lizard got one of those rare lifts 
recently from her old friend 
Elaine Lasky. 

One evening Old Line Dancin' 
invited Elaine over to brush up 
on some of their line dance steps. 
Elaine was all flushed with an- 
ticipation from the minute she 
arrived at Lizard's house. Lizard 
naturally assume it was because 
of the impending evening of 
stompin' and kickln'. Elaine 
quickly set the record straight, 
explaining the newest comet, 
hovering some cablllion miles 
overhead, would be easily viewed 
with the naked eye this particular 
evening because cloud condi- 
tions were perfect Elaine tried 
desperately to get the reluctant 
Lizard outside to view this phe- 
nomenon, but relented to wait 
until after their line dance ses- 
sion had ended. Elaine quickly 
pointed out it was probably bet- 
ter to watt as the comet became 
more prominent as the night 
wore on. 

So after several hours of 
ychaain', Lizard, the ever proper 
hostess, walked her guest to the 
door to see her off safely. Upon 
reaching the door, Elaine re- 
quested the Old Retired One to 
accompany her outside to see the 
comet — it was, after all, the 
biggest since Haley's and proba- 
bly wouldn't happen again for 
1,000 years. Now, Elaine is one of 
those rare people left in this 
world who literally stops' and 
smells every rose that may cross 
her path. She takes life in stride 
and enjoys all the little things life 
offers, things most people take 
for granted. Her enthusiasm for 
this latest scientific discovery, 
although creating little appeal to 
the Lizard, had filtered down 
through her whole family. They 
had devoted hours of phone calls 
to this. speck up in the sky, while 
The Lizard herself was busily 
burning up the phone lines hyp- 
ing her latest discovery: line 
dancing. So The Lizard, not 
wanting to miss history in the 
making, consented to witness the 
great constellation above — she 
figured she would never live 
another 1,000 years to see the 
next one as It hovered over 
Antioch, 

So on went the shoes as the 
two proceeded out Into the yard 
to witness the extravaganza tak- 
ing place overhead. As the mo- 
ment passed, Lizard headed back 
into the comforts of her warn 
house; Elaine inquired as to 
where she was going. The Old 
One, not having the heart to shat- 
ter the spell transfixed over 

University hosts 
meetings at CLC 

National- Louis University will 
host a meeting April 25 to discuss 
its Bachelor of Science in 
Management program at the 
College of Lake County, 19351 W. 
Washington, Grayslake. 

The meeting begins at 6 p.m. 
and will take place in Room C209. 
For more information or to 
schedule an individual appoint- 
ment about any University pro- 
gram, call (708) 510-6100. 



V.-:;: 



REM! t>l DEm 



rlEiNEW ARErVCODE FOR OUR 

AREAJS'{847} 




KifeS$&i 



Elaine, simply covered her tracks 
by stating she was going In to 
order a telescope so she could 
view the celestial undertaking 
more dearly. 

Now the Old Retired Line 
Dancin' Lizard, who was not 
nearly as caught up in this whole 
comet experience as her friend, 



JINGLE FROM PRINCLE 



LYNN 
PRINGLE 




79^6764 



was actually using this quiet time 
more creatively than most would 
suspect. Instead of jiggling 
around like an antsy child, she 
stood still as if interested n the 
view, while the whole time her 
mind was trying to come up with 
a name for her new Line Dance 
Emporium (in the event she ever 
won the lottery) — that fact has 
absolutely no bearing on the 
story at all. 

What counts is that time was 
consumed and a memory was 
created as two old women stood 
silently outside, side-by-sidc, in 
the wee hours of the morning, in 
the freezing cold, staring up at 
the heavens. There are just some 
God-given things you can never 
buy. (Can't imagine what the 
neighbors were thinking cither!) 

Exploring the Internet 

Do you border on "Internet 
Illiteracy?" Do the terms "in- 
formation superhighway" and 
"surfing the net" bring images of 
over crowded highways and surf- 
boards? Or perhaps you have 
recently subscribed to the Inter- 
net because the computer sales- 
man said it was a good thing to 
do, but you still haven't the 
vaguest idea what all the hoopla 
is about Then the Antioch Li- 
brary has the perfect solution to 
bring you and your software into 
the 90s. 

On Thursday, April 25, at 7 



p.m., Joe Accardi from North- 
eastern University will present a 
seminar discussing what the In- 
ternet Is and how the normal guy 
on the street can utilize it So be- 
tween now and next Thursday, 
start jotting down all your ques- 
tions, no matter how trivial they 
may seem, on a pad of paper for 
Mr. Accardi. (Be sure to leave 
space between questions so you 
can write down the answers.) 

Now, Mr. Accardi doesn't 
promise to turn you into a com- 
puter guru over night, and you 
won't leave the seminar feeling 
the overwhelming urge to buy a 
pocket protector, but he is hop- 
ing to help enrich your computer 
expertise. The seminar will be 
held at the library and there is no 
admission fee — so after you arc 
done reading this column, start- 
ing writing down those ques- 
tions. 

Arbor Day 

On Saturday, April 27, the An- 
tioch Parks and Recreation Dcpt 
will be celebrating Arbor Day at 
North Park. (North Park is lo- 
cated on Donin Drive, north of 
North Avenue.) Any families or 
individuals interested in helping 
out should call the Parks and 
Recreation Dept. at 395-2160, 
and, Happy Arbor Day. 

The public has spoken 

Well folks, the "cutesy Pringle 
stories" have come under public 
attack. If any of you witnessed 
the unnamed request in 
Lipservicc a couple of weeks 
back, you arc aware that some- 
body out there feels I think too 
highly of myself and the anec- 
dotes that go on around me. Per- 
haps I do, but hey, be grateful 
that I'm occupied writing about 
myself and my family mem- 
bers — otherwise I might be com- 
pelled to write about people who 
give their opinions so anony- 
mously. 

And so goes another "Jingle 
from Pringle"...don't forget to 
call 395-6364. 




Catch Them 



... . • i 



Free Motorola 
Phone i-jiim 

Free Activation 

(With eligible 3-year service plan). 



J 



What a great way to stay in touch this spring. Ameritech is 
offering this Motorola Flip Phone - Lightweight, convenient and 
loaded with exceptional features. It's all you need to help you 
through the spring and it's FREE when you sign 
up on an eligible 3 year service plan. 



$ 



RJ&E?"' 




Taxes, tolls, contract feet and restrictions apply. Customer pays seller 1 ! tax on free phone. 
Sec store for details, Offer expires May 11,1 996. 



PROVIDING CELLULAR SOLUTIONS DESIGNED AROUND YOU 



(Afileritech 


• Crystal Clear Calling Quality 

• 24-Hour Customer Service 

• Nationwide Call Delivery Service 

• Enhanced Products and Services 

■ 


Cellular And Paging Dealer . 



ANTIOCH CELLULAR 

*%&£££■ 847/838-5206 




Leader of the pack 

Ted Axton, president of First National Bank of Antioch, rides 
his lawn mower through town during the annual Antioch 
Easter Parade. — Photo by Linda Chapman 



FOOT FORWARD 

-FROM THE OFFICE OF 



Antioch Foot Health Center 

Gary J. Guziec, D.PM Ltd. 
GaryM. Kazmer> D.PM. 



CORNS AND CALLUSES 

Although corns and calluses arc so common, many people - especially 
the elderly - fail to deal with them properly. 

Corns and calluses are layers of dead skin that build up into a hardened 
mass. They can be painfiil when they press on sensitive nerves. 

'Treating corns or calluses yourself can be harmful, especially it you 
have diabetes or poor circulation," the National Institute on Aging advises. 
"Over-the-counter medicines, advertised as cures for corns, contain acids 
that destroy tissue but do not treat the cause." 

Your podiatrist can determine the nature of corns and calluses and can 
recommend treatment, which may include obtaining better-fitting shoes 
and/or pads, medication, and surgery. 

Presented In the Interest of better foot care by 

ANTIOCH FOOT HEALTH CENTER 

41380 N. Highway 83 • Antioch 

(847) 395-0627 

24 Hour Answering Service 



I 



•NECK/SHOULDER PAIN 

• HEADACHES 
•PINCHED NERVES 

• ARTHRITIS PAIN 



• LOW BACK PAIN 

• SCIATICA 
« HIP PAIN 
•AUTO/WORK INJURIES 



NEW PATIENT SPECIAL OFFER 



CONSULTATION 
EXAMINATION 

(A $120.00 VALUE) X-RAYS (AS NEEDED) 



EASY AND AFFORDABLE 



1. MOST INSURANCE ACCEPTED. 
WE EVEN FILE YOUR CLAIMS! 

2. EASY PAYMENT PLANS FOR 
THOSE WITH NO INSURANCE 




Dr. Richard R. Kortan 



702 ROLLINS ROAD 
ROUND LAKE BEACH 

(In the Walmart/Omnl Center) 

CALL TODAY FOR 
AN APPOINTMENT 

Duo to the Legal nature of 
Worker's Compensation 

and personal Injury, this offer Is 
not valid for those cases 

but, are usually covered 100%. 



740-1100 



a a & u & - a a a « ;* .* - . j * > - < ; - ■< : • - * - • 



1 



Apart 19, 1996 LAkEtANd Newspapers COMMUNITY 




THISWEEK 

Smokin' 

^Antioch track team 
makes best showing at 

; 25th annual Stevenson 
relays. 
PAqeA12 

A matter 
of faith 

Northwestern University 

ACHS students the 
importance of faith 
lRftqEA12 





•pommeb; 



state 

}> ^The Special ^Recieation 
Association of Central Lake 
^County (SRACLQ gymnasts 
j competed riui the Regional 
Special ■: Olympics meet last 
Sunday at Mujndeleta High 
School, with several members 
medaling. 

Those team members plac- 
ing were: 

• Scott Allen— vault II (1st 

■ place), pommel horse I (1st 

'place). ■- ; 

• Erik Anderson 
horse IV (1st place), rings IV 
(1st place). 

• Bridget Carroll ~ all- 
around (2nd place), vault II 

- (2nd place), floor exerdse II 
(1st place), balance beam II 

I (1st place), uneven bars II (1 st 
place). 

• Ryan Chapin .;— r parallel 
bars II (1st place), rings n (1st 

plaCe). >: ■■'.'.:'; 

• Alex Engels •— vault I (2nd 
place), parallel bars! I (1st 

P lac *>v 

• Valerie Pennoyer— • hoop 

I .'■' (2nd place), ribbon' I (2nd 
place), 

Many of the athlete will 
advance to the state competi- 
tion. to be heUJJune ^I4rl6 at 
" : , Illinois" State JlJniverslty In 
BIoomlngtotL 

The SRACLCiaiso^ wishes to 
thank the coaches who volun- 
teered their time to train these 
athletes for com^tMbn. They 
Include head coach Norbert 
BendlyenV (owner of the 
Gymnastics Spot)* assistant 
cc^ Dehise Cortesl (SRAGLC ' 
Recreation Specialist),, katle 
Heinrich, Stephanie Sbniiners, 
liz Friedman, Scott Headley, 
Michael vHeadley, -Lauren 
Headley and Sarah Goiaric. 

Storm drops first 
contest of season 

f v In ; their Inaugural game,;, 
the lindenhurst Storm girls 
U-l#teamVjfeU to'tne Lyons 
S.G Shooting Stars 3-2.^ ; 

The Storm play v^, dam-; 
inatlng most of the game, and 
actually outshot the Lyons 
squad. Lyons,* however, bene- 
fitted from a wind-blown shot . 
that was deflected^lnto the 
net, Several Stars shots hit me 
crossbar. ■ 

Terl LaRoche scoredboth 
goals for Uncterihiirst, yvitih 

-assists going to: Jaune Foster 
and Stephanie Coby. 

Other : | standouts for 

I Undenhurst Included Lamm 

peatty, KristcnGamlln; Susan 
Goscinlak and Ami© Smlfc | 



Dangel, Dunleavy's no-nos, defense pace CLC to wins 



STEVE PETERSON 

Staff Reporter 

Joel Dangel and Dan Dunlcavy doubled 
their fun at the expense of Elgin batters 
Saturday. 

Both College of Lake County pitchers 
notched no-hitters as CLC swept Elgin 10-0 
and 8-0 in Skyway Conference play. 

"They hit the ball on the ground a lot and 
the lnflelders did a good job," Dangel, a 
Warren Township High School grad, said. 

Neither Dangel (4-3) or Dunlcavy (4-2) 
pitcher relied on the strikeout pitch much as 
both fanned two Spartans. CLC improved to 
23-10 overall, 4-0 Skwyay Conference. 

"I just used the fastball and the slider. I 
just wanted to throw the fastball in the cold 
weather," Dunlcavy, a Grant High grad, said. 

The double dose of no-hitters was the sec- 
ond time that happened in CLC history. 

"They were just dominating," CLC Coach 



Gene Hanson said. 

CLC split against DuPage, winning the 
first. 10-5 but losing the second 9-0. Joe 
Bamhardt (2-1) gained the first game win. 
Mike Niemczyk, Levar DUIard and Fat 
Goodman each had two hits in the win. 
CLC hosts Aurora at 2 p.m. April 19; Morton 
at 12 p.m. April 20 in Skyway Conference 
play; and Milwaukee Area Technical College 
at 12 p.m. April 21 In Grayslake. The 
Lancers may well be called Team Vacuum 
soon. 

"in the last four games, we have had 49 
assists and only three errors. That is a lot of 
handling the ball in the cold weather. It Is 
hard to catch but the real problem Is it Is hard 
to throw," Hanson said. 

Illinois Benedictine was the next foe for 
CLC and the Lancers won 7-2 and 7-3. George 
Valko gained the win in the first game with 
relief help from Pat Goodman. Dave 



Marquardt (1-2) won the second game. 

In the first game, the Lancers increased a 
lead to 5-0 In the third as Bob Hlousck walked 
and later scored and Cory Clark singled and 
scored. Mike Niemczyk beat out a key infield 
hit to load the bases and Levar Dillard de- 
livered an RBI single. 

The Lancers had executed well In the first 
inning as Hlousck, Clark and Niemczyk all 
singled and Steve Greenspan had a sacrifice 
RBI for two runs. 

Greenspan would add three more RBIs in 
game one and was four-of-five for see RBIs for 
the day. 

"He was in a hitting slump and he really 
snapped out of it. I moved him around In the 
batting order because certain places in the 
order get certain pitches," Hanson said of 
Greenspan. 

"I did a lot of extra hitting I concentrated 
See BASES page A13 



SPORTS 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



'Be on Team' program teams with athletes for spiritual growth 

For two years now, the Be on 
the Team program has been play- 
ing a special role in the develop- 
ment of Antloch Community 
High School basketball players. 

The program celebrated the 
end of Its second year Saturday 
night at the Antloch Evangelical 
Free Church with a dinner to 
honor the athletes and their 
sponsors. The evening featured a 
guest speaker, prayer, dinner, 
awards, skits and, most impor- 
tantly, a feeling of community 
between area churches and high 
school athletes. 

The Be on the Team program 
works like this: adults from com- 
munity churches become 
Teammates" to a member of one 
of Antioch's basketball teams — 
last year the program began with 
the boys sophomore and varsity 
teams, but this year expanded to 
include girls varsity and JV 
squads. 

As a Teammate, one attends 
games, write letters of encour- 
agement, prays for the athletes' 
safety and spiritual development, 
and sponsors the player and his 
or her family at the annual din- 
ner. This year's sponsors came 
from St Peter's Catholic Church 
and Antloch Evangelical Free 
Church in Antloch, St. Mark's 
Lutheran Church in Lindenhurst, 
Prince of Peace Catholic Church 
and Lake Villa United Methodist 
Church in Lake Villa 

This season, hi addition to 
going to games individually, pro- 
gram members attended two 
games as a group, meeting after- 
ward with players and their fami- 
lies. 

According to Be on the Team 
organizer Ron Gillespie, "As the 
program grows It will still honor 




Mark Fowler, a Teammate in the Be on the Team Program, enjoys Saturday nighf s festivities with 
his son Zach. Fowler sponsors a sophomore player in the program. — Photo by Daniel Ramage 



its commitment to show Christ's 
love by serving others. The Be on 
the Team program continues to 
show that personal relationships 
between people from local 
churches, the high school and 
community can make a positive 
difference within our world." 

Marie Fowler Is a Teammate, 
and he has very specific reasons 
why he got involved. 

"I have a strong belief that 
God isn't in the school any 
more," said Fowler. "This way we 
can help these athletes with their 
spiritual growth without getting 
into all that church and state 
Issue." 



Gillespie also says that the 
school administration is very 
supportive of the program. The 
administration welcomes the 
opportunity to achieve a height- 
ened Interaction with members 
of the communities that feed Into 
ACHS. 

Saturday's dinner was attend- 
ed by Northwestern University 



strength and conditioning coach 
Larry Lilja, who spoke to atten- 
dees on the importance of faith in 
athletic endeavors and how it 
translates to everyday life. 

After the meal, a player from 
each squad was recognized as the 
Be on the Team Player of the 
Year. This year's honorees 
See DINNER page A13 




Sidekicks MarfW Arts 

SPRING SPECIAL 2 for 1 

CALL TODAY* 
(8a7) 356-1424 

2108 E. Grand Ave., Lindenhurst 



Nov offering Martial Arts Supplies Wholesale -Retail 



ATLAS PIERS 




(Since 1964) 



Heat* 

Slip 

Resistant 



Denny's Piers Inc. 

In Water Exhibit 

Design & Install Yourself 

As Seen At Midwest Boat Show 

(815) 675-2064 




Maintenance 
free 



■»« "*. i w <bpi . ii h ' 'S**ff* 







> 



M 



All 



COMMUNITY UktlANd Newspapers Apnil 19, 1996 



mm • \ 



Antioch, Carmel lead the field at 25th annual Stevenson Relays 



Though team totals aren't 
the order of the day, the Antioch 
Sequoits proved to be the team 
to beat at the 25th annual 
Stevenson Relays last Friday 
night. 

The ACHS team ran off with 
a third of the meet titles, win- 
ning six of the 18 events. 
Antioch was particularly strong 
in the field events. 

Antioch started off with a 
win in the 440 high hurdle shut- 
tle relay, with the team of Kevin 
Fasana, Mike Castiglia, Geoff 
Landrum and David Gooch tsak- 
ing the event in a time of l:0fl.7, 
nearly two full seconds ahead of 
the second-place Nllcs West 
foursome. 

That same clutch of Antioch 
hurdlers doubled their pleasure, . 
capturing another First in the 
440 intermediate hurdle relay 
with a time of 1:06. 

In the field events, ACHS 
shone in the discus, shot put 
and pole vault. John Migalla was 
particularly potent, winning 
both the discus and the shot put 
with tosses of 146'9" and 49', 
respectively. Migalla also took 
second in the "Big Boy" 100, 
covering 100 yards in a 
respectable :12.2. 

In the pole vault, it was 
Antioch 's Jason Erlcnborn tak- 
ing first, finishing a foot over the 
next best vault with a lu'6' 
effort. 




Starkey's 
grand slam 
lifts CLC 



STEVE PETERSON 



Anlioch's Kevin Fasana gels the Sequoit 440 high hurdle shuttle relay team off to a good start, run- 
ning the first leg of the race. ACHS won the event in a time of 1:08.7. — Photo by Daniel Ramage 



Carmel also took multiple 
firsts, like Antioch showing 
strength in the field events. The 
threesome of Ruben Rivera, 
Mike Graham and Jim Koclpcr 
won the long jump with respec- 
tive leaps of 21 '4.5", 19\75 B and 
17'1.5 W . 

Graham led Carmel to victo- 
ry in the high jump as well, his 
6'0" spring the best of the 



Registration begins for ACHS camp 

Young athletes interested in bettering their basketball skills 
may be interested in signing up for the Sequoit Summer 
Basketball camp. 

Hoopsters in grades 4-9 arc eligible to attend the camp, to 
be held at Antioch Community High School The camp will be 
taught by ACHS coaching staff and local high school athletes. 

Week one of the camp will focus on Individual skills and will 
run June 11-14. The second week, focusing on individual and 
team skills, will be held June 17-21. 

Grades 4-5 will meet from 9-10:30 a.m., grades 6-7 from 
10:30 a.m.-noon, and grades 8-9 will play from 12:30-2 p.m. 

Cost is $50 for both weeks, or $35 for one week. 

For more information, contact Coach Jeff Dresser at ACHS. 




BICYCLE AND ACCESSORY SALE 

10 - 15% OFF All Accessories 

ONE WEEK ONLY 

April 19, 1996 - April 26, 1996 

Cannondale M200 3 89 

Alum. Frame/Built in the U.S.A. Reg. $419.99 

$ 179" 

Reg. $194.99 

Ask about our 

"Crow with GIRO" 

Kid Helmet Program 



Dyno VFR BMX Bike 




Tail winds 



Cyclery 



1816 E. Belvidere Rd. Crayslake, IL 60030 
(847) 223-1798 

Hours: 

M.W,Th,F10-7 

Sat. 9-5; Sun. 12-4 

Closed Tuesday 



Corsair three. Koclpcr and Jon 
Styx rounded out the effort, each 
jumping 5'4". 

The Corsair team of Andres 
Ccritos, Andy Webb, Bill Fusz 
and Tim Rodcr nailed down a 
first-place finish in the longest 
relay of the event, blazlg 
through the 3,200 meter relay in 
8:20.6. 

Carmcl's final win of the 
meet was in the varsity 800 
meter relay, with Lee Johnson, 
Greg Zomchek, Andy Klein and 
Rivera finsihing the course in 
1:34.8. 

Warren was the only other 
squad with multiple winners. In 
the varsity 1,600 meter relay, the 
Blue Devil squad of Steve 
Braydcn, WU Anchahas, Darnell 
Smith and Romel Overton com- 
pleted four turns of the track in 



3:33.6. The fresh-soph squad also 
exhibited its strength in the 1,600, 
with Dan Schober, Matt Ukcna, 
Carl Morrow and Casper Williams 
taking first In a time of 3:53. 

Smith led the way for Warren 
in a triple jump win as well, his 
42*3.5" leap the best of the day. 
Teammates Anchahas and Jason 
Foster rounded out the effort 
with respective jumps of ^"A.S" 
and36'l". 

Grant, Stevenson, Round 
Lake, Lake Zurich, Cary-Grovc, 
Nile West and Highland Park 
also competed. Grant's Tony 
Coniglio captured first in the Big 
Boy 100, finsihing in : 11.5, while 
Stcvnson captured a first in the 
girls 400 meter relay, with the 
team of Swan, Airela, Mondo 
and Bcnnct turning in a :52.2 
effort. 



Staff Reporter 

"Tag up, tag up/' Kerry 
Pctricig's teammates shouted. 

Melissa Starkey of College of 
Lake County's softball team had 
lifted a fly ball to right field. The 
hit got caught up in the breeze, 
carrying It over the fence for a 24- 
20 CLC win over McHcnry. 

"I just was trying to hit a long 
flyball," Starkey said. 

The Mundclcin High grad did 
more than that this Skyway 
Conference win. The freshman 
contributed a triple, a single and 
scored four runs and had seven 
RBIs. 

"We hit well in Arizona and 
have not stopped. Everybody has 
hit well," CLC Coach Sue Garcia 
said. 

CLC had a 19-hit attack 
against the Scots. They needed to 
tic the game In the eighth inning 
as McHcnry scored a run for a 
20-19 lead. Laura Grassle ripped 
a triple to center, eluding a tag on 
a pick- off. 

Howes reached on a fielder's 
choice, and Kerry Pctricig sin- 
gled, Vicki Wyatt received an 
intentional walk and a grounder 
by Trish DeWittc forced a runner 
at home, setting the stage for 
Starkey. 

Offense was frequent this 
windy and warm day in 
Grayslakc. The two clubs com- 
bined for 40 hits. CLC led 8-0 
after three Innings before the 
game was suspended due to 
darkness. 

When the first game was 
over, Howes had scored two runs 
and had two RBIs; Pctricig had a 
Sec STARKEY page A13 





FOR A DEERE 

$1996 



13 HP 

38" Mower 

Kohlcr Engine 

90 days No Interest/No Payments* 




OR JUST $40 PER MONTH 
STX38 5-SPEED 




"Subject to credit approval. 10% clown payment required. Non-commercial use only. Offer ends 29 June, 1996. 





IMPLEMENT 
COMPANY 



N 
C. 




OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE SINCE 1923 

HY. 83, 5 ML NORTH OF ANTIOCH 

SALEM, Wl • 414-843-2326 • HOURS 7 - 5 MON. - SAT. 



1 



■ 



Ap.il 19, 1996 UeIancI Newspapers COMMUNITY 




AN RAMAGE 



- 



Hi it took for Wildcats was hard work and a little bit of faith 



According to Larry Lilja, you 
have to have faith. 

As the strength and condi- 
tioning coach for the 
Northwestern Wildcats, Lilja 
spoke Saturday night at the 
annual Be on the Team Dinner 
held at the Antioch Evangelical 
Free Ghurch. Be on the Team is 
a program that benefits the 
Antioch 
Community 
HlghcSchool 
basketball 
t e am s , 




encouraging 
them to 
grow spiri- 
tually as well 
as athleti- 
cally. . 

/■Lilja was 
a perfect choice for the gather- 
ing. A devout Christian himself, 
lilja makes it a point to convey 
his faith to his players. As head 
of the campus Fellowship of 
Christian Athletes, he says that 
over: half the NU football team 
regularly attends the meetings. 

With this coach, faith is not 
just idle talk. To hear him tell it, 
a football coach at 
Northwestern has sometimes 
Bnecdcd more faith than the 
average coach. 



"We were bad," said Lilja 
with a tight smile. "Between 
1978 and 1902, we didn't win a 
single game. Imagine being a 
freshman in 1978, graduating 
without ever having won a 
game. 

"Against Ohio State one of 
those years, by the end of the 
first quarter they had their third 
string in. We had to bring in the 
second-string punter because 
our first-string punter was get- 
ting leg cramps." 

But the Northwestern pro- 
gram has turned around 180 
degrees, as shown by this year's 
Big Ten championship and the 
school's first trip to the Rose 
Bowl in decades. It took a lot of 
faith for the upstart Wildcats to 
even believe such a thing was 
possible — an institution that 
vehemently stresses academic, 
NU draws the top scholars, 
which often aren't the blue-chip 
athletes. Those that had that 
faith went to Pasadena. One 
who didn't watched from home, 
no doubt wishing he's shown a 
little more faith. 

"We had a quarterback, a 
senior, quit last fall," said Lilja 
with a sad shake of his head. 
"He was that close to a Big Ten 
championship, that close to 



going to Pasadena." 

Despite losing one along the 
way, however, Lilja and the 
other NU coaches kept plug- 
ging. They convinced their team 
there was no short cut to suc- 
cess, but hard work (and they do 
mean hard) could take them to 
the top. Hard work, and a bit of 
faith. 

The team probably needed 
that faith one summer day when 
they traveled to "Mt. 
Trashmore," a former landfill 
that is now a high, tortuously 
steep hill near Evanston. With a 
heat and humidity index of 114 
degrees — one of many such 
days during last summer's 
workouts — the players were no 
doubt chagrined to find the 
coaches wanted them to sprint 
to the top, not once but several 
times. 

Lilja played a short film of 
that day, with the straining, 
determined players struggling 
to reach the top. At the summit, 
Lilja had planted a sign that 
simply said "Rose Bowl." 

One player, upon reaching 
the top, was heard to say "1 
think I can sec Pasadena from 
up here." 

"That guy," Lilja said simply, 
"had faith. And look where it got us." 




a 



Lilja 



Bases 



Dinner 



From page All 

on driving my top hand forward," Greenspan 

said. 

The Lancers had a consistent effort from right- 
fielder Nicmczyk. The Round Lake High grad had four 
hits with two triples and four RB Is in the second Illinois 
Benedictine game. He had four RBls in the win over 
DuPage. 



"You can just see the improvement each game. He 
was out of baseball for a couple of years. You can see his 
confidence building," Hanson said. 

Another key clement for the Lancers is lead-off hit- 
ter Eric Villarreal. The Waukcgan High grad was six-of- 
scven Sunday and is hitting .375, His on-base average is 
close to GO percent, Hanson said. 




From page All 

included Kevin Geraghty, Richard "Joe" Jordan, Dana Pierson and 
Emily Bcmabe. Special awards were given to ball boys Nathanacl and 
Andrew Judson to honor them for their support of the ACHS teams. 

Perhaps the best indicator of the program is the effect it has on the 
athletes themselves. Sequoit roundballer Kevin Chudd sees the pro- 
gram as a boon to the basketball squad. 

"It's great to know that people take an intcrst in me by writing let- 
ters and supporting our team. It really makes a difference when some- 
one cares about our effort," said Chudd. 



From page A12 

pair of hits, an RB I and a walk; Wyatt scored a run, had two hits and walked 

and Jen Pitcher had a walk and a run. 

$In the second game, CLC punched the winning run across in the sev- 
enth inning. Pitcher and Petridg singled and Howe reached on an error. 
The key play came when Jodi Botsford reached on an error as the third 
baseman overthrew the ball. 

i The first game featured a huge CLC comeback. Down 6-0, the CLC 
offense began to click in the fifth, Howes then dellcvered the game-win- 
fmng hit, a line drive shot 




Owning America's Best is Easy! 



$50 or $ WO 

U.S. Sayings Bonds 
on Selected 
Products! 




FREE* 
Financing 

on Selected 
Products! 



TROY-Blir Great North American Lawn & Garden Sweepstakes 

^MA^Deta/fe At This Participating TROY-BILT Dealen 

Enter 
o Win! 



Interstate Farm Equipment, Inc. 

- 1 Mile North Of Hwy. 50 On Hwy. 45 Bristol, Wl 53t04 




No Purchase 
Necessary t 



(414) 857-7971 



1 When credit qualified for TROY-BILT - Credit Card Services After 6 months, (or length ol extended term) the prevailing Annual 
Percentage Rate it 19.92% and rriinimum finance charge is 50<; varies by state ol residence. Ask your Dealer tor details 



c 

L 
A 

S 

s 



s • 

^ w 

!F o 

£ E 

n N 
s 

E 



TOLDKEN 



Improve 

• Self-Discipline And Setf-Confidence 
•Attitude and Habits 

• Concentration Problems 

• Overcome The Abuse at School 
Due to Shyness or Overweight 



WOMEN & MEN 



•Lose Weight 

• Leam Practical Self -Defense 
•BuildSeff-Confidence 

• Physical Fitness 




E ? f L 

D f! 
Re 

E Sf 

; N e 



A 

S 
S 



OPEN HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 

10:30 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. 
Sat. 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. 

Antioch • 919 Toft Ave. 



i 

i 
i 






-'-•■ -Zj.' . 







COMMUNITY UIceIancI Newspapers Apxil 19, 1996 






r 



r 



' 



Fox Waterway Agency home at last at Hidden Cove 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 

Staff Reporter 

Fox Lake, namely the former 
Hidden Cove Marina, will be the 
official home of the Fox Waterway 
Agency. 

"We're here to stay," 
exclaimed Fox Waterway Agency 
Chairman William Dam. 

After price negotiations with 
property owner Ray Freeman and 
state officials teetered on murky 
waters, the state was able to 
secure the 3-acrc marinaand por- 



tions of the bay for $656,000. 

Freeman's original asking 
price was $736,000. 

Upon the expiration of the 
agency's lease period at the mari- 
na which ended March 31, agency 
officials quickly worked to over- 
come numerous obstacles to pur- 
chase the property. The state 
refused to pay more than $656,250 
for the property. 

Karen Kabbes, executive direc- 
tor of the agency, reportedly expe- 
dited the deal by traveling to 



Springfield to spearhead officials 
from the Illinois Department of 
Natural Resources. 

She was able to work out a 
two-year lease period in which the 
agency will pay Freeman $36,000 
annually for 1 acre of land behind 
the Taco Bell. The compromise 
allows Freeman to make up the 
difference of his original asking 
price. The agency will use the par- 
cel for storage. 

Dam pointed out that state 
officials appraised the property 




Karl Wenkenbach, Lake Villa and Tyler Clark, Antioch, play their version of catch on a beauti- 
ful morning at the Lindenhurst Early Childhood Center. — Photo by Linda Chapman 



Agency changes 
meeting location 

The Fox Waterway Agency is 
changing the location of its April 
25 board meeting and Johnsburg 
speed limit hearing to the 
Mcllenry High School, West 
Campus, 4724 W. Crystal Lake 
Rd., McHenry. The purpose of 
the meeting location change is to 
comfortably accommodate the 
larger crowds that arc expected 
to attend the hearing. 

"We want to make sure we 
have room for everyone who 
wants to attend," commented 
Stan Mill, agency's director and 
McHenry County co-chair of the 
Buoy and Safety Committee. 

fThe board will also entertain 
comments on the proposed 
removal of some of the existing 
no-wake areas in Catherine, 
Channel, Fox, Petite, Pistakec, 
Marie and Redhead Lakes. A 
majority of the areas being 
removed are within 150-feet of 

i, 

shore and therefore are already 
covered by the agency's lake 

<• shoreline no-wake ordinance. 
"Should the homeowners in 
those areas continue to want the 
areas marked within 150-feet of 
shore, they may purchase buoys 
in accordance with our current 
procedure," state Bob Lindquist, 
agency director and Lake County 
co-chair of the Buoy and Safety 
Committee. 

The remaining areas are pri- 
marily shallow areas that would 

- be remarked as such. Maps of the 
proposed changes arc available 
from the agency offices at 45 S. 
Pistakec Lake Rd., Fox Lake. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
The VILLAGE OF ANTIOCH will bo flushing hydrants betwoon APRIL I 
|1, 1996 and APRIL 30, 1906. Rushing will occur between the hours of 0:001 
I A.M. and 4:00 P.M. Monday Ihru Friday. Signs will be postod In oach aroal 
Jbolore (lushing begins. It Is advised that no laundry bo dono between these| 
I hours when Hushing occurs. 

Also, It Is advised that walor be visually lostod for rust before doing laun-| 
Idry. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL (847) 395-1881. 

0396E-727-ARI 

March 29, 1996 

April 5, 1996] 

April 12, 1996 

April 19, 1996 

April 26, 1996 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Falrlleld 

Enterprises 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 112 N. 
Fairfield Road, Undenhurst, IL 60046; 

847-356-8757 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CON-DUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Klmberty A. Landl, 112 N. Fairfield 
Road, Undenhurst, IL 60046; 847- 
356-8757. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This b to certify that the undersigned 
lntond{8) to conduct the above named 
business from the locatk>n(s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real full 
name(s) of the porson(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/aro correct as shown. 
Klmberty A. Landl 
March 28, 1996 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son^) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 28th day of March, 1998. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Sarah L. Carlson 

Deputy County Clork 

Received: March 26, 1996 

Wlllard R. Holandor 

Lake County Clerk 

0496A-744-LV 

April 5, 1996 

April 12, 1996 

April 19, 1996 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Global Jam 

R/v*orrte 

ADDRESSES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 38952 
Deop Lato Rd., Lake Villa, IL 60046, 
(647) 356-9084; P.O. Box 1199, Lake 
Vina, IL 60046. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CON-DUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Gootfrey A. MacKenzle, 38950 N. 
Deep Lake Rd., Lake Villa, (L 60046; 
(847) 356-8526. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This Is to certify thai the undersigned 
intend(s) to conduct the above named 
buslnoss from the local lon{s) Indicat- 
ed and that the true or real lull 
namo(s) of the porson(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
Geoffrey A. MacKenzle 
April 8, 1996 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(s) intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 8th day of April, 1998. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Carmen E. Toro 

Nolary Public 

Received: Aprils, 1996 

Wlllard R. Hetander 

Lake County Clerk 

0496B-767-LV 

April 12, 1996 

April 19, 1996 

April 26, 1996 



for $730,000. 

The actual purchasing price is 
substantially less than that," said 
Dam, noting the $656,000 figure. 

He called the deal a win-win 
situation for the agency and 
Freeman. 

A year ago, the agency rented 
space at its current site after hop 
scotching from three different 
sites at a Grand Avenue office, a 
Nippcrsink storage area and a 
Spring Grove warehouse. 

Dam said the Hidden Cove site 
is centrally located for boaters 
cruising the Chain of Lakes 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Indie Music 

Promotions 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 38952 
Deop Lako Rd., Lako Villa. IL 60046; 
P.O. Box 1199, Lako Villa, IL 60046. 
NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CON-DUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Geoffrey A. MacKonzlo, 38950 Deep 
Lako Rd., Lako Villa, IL 60046. 
STATE OF ILLINOIS . 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This b to certify that the undersigned 
Inlond(s) to conduct tho abovo named 
buslnoss from tho locatlon(s) Indlcat- 
od and that the truo or real full 
namo(s) of tho person (a) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting the business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
Gooftrey A. MacKenzle 
April 8, 1996 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged bofore mo by tho per- 
son's) Intending to conduct tho busi- 
ness this 8th day of April, 1996. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Carmen E. Toro 

Notary Public 

Received: April 8, 1996 

Wlllard R. Holandor 

Lako County Clerk 

0496B-768-LV 

April 12, 1996 

April 19. 1996 

April 26, 1996 



between Lake and McHenry 
counties. f 

"We now have a permanent 
site," Dam said. "It allows us to 
run the marina and keep that rev- 
enue and use the building for 
maintenance." 

He also noted that the agency 
can now focus its attention oh 
other pressing issues such as 
channel dredging. 

"By being at one site,'* Dam 
said, "we arc able to double our 
production day— like for dredging 
and shoreline protection." 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME CERTIFICATE 

NAME OF BUSINESS: Llghlhouse 

Markotlng Group 

ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 1713 E. 
Grand Ave., Lindenhurst, IL 60046, 
(647) 265-8450. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OF THE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CON-DUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSINESS: 
Jlrl J. Laurich, 1713 E. Grand Ave., 
Lindenhurst, IL 60046; (847) 356- 
4479, 

STATE OF ILLINOIS 
COUNTY OF LAKE 

This Is to certify that tho undorslgned 
Inlond(s) to conduct the above named 
business from the locatlon(s) indicat- 
ed and that the truo or real full 
namo(s) of the porson(s) owning, con- 
ducting or transacting tho business 
Is/are correct as shown. 
Jlrl J. Laurich 
March 28. 1996 

The foregoing Instrument was 
acknowledged before me by the per- 
son(g) Intondlng to conduct tho busi- 
ness this 28th day of March, 1996. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

Barbara J. ErsWn 

Notary Public 

Rocolved: March 28, 1996 

Wlllard R. Holandor 

Lake County Clerk 

0496A-745-LV 

April 5, 1996 

April 12, 1996 

April 19, 1996 



FILE NUMBER: 
PETITIONER: 



OWNERS: 
PROPERTY 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 
PLANNING & ZONING BOARD 

VILLAGE OF ANTIOCH 
PZB96-8 

Pam Roschke and Greg Reschko 
155 Ze linger La no 
Antioch, IL 60002 
same as petitioner 

Commonly known as 155 Zolngor Lane; PIN 02-05400-002; 
and legally describod«s: 

PARCEL 1 : That part of tho West Half of Government Lot 

2 of Iho East Fractional Half of Section 5. Townshfe 48 North, 

Range 10, East of tho Third Principal Meridian, described 

as follows: Commencing at a point on the North lino of 

Zellnger Lane (as shown on he plat of ZELINGER'S 

APPLE RIDGE SUBDIVISION ol part of the West half of 

Lots 1 and 2 of the East Fractional Half of said Section 5, 

according to Iho plat thereof recorded April 13, 1923 as 

Document 222661 In Book "L* of Plats, page 60). 217.5 

foot West of tho East line of tho West Half ol Government 

Lot 2 of the East Fractional Half alorosald; thence West 

on the North lino ol said Zellngor Lane, 72.5 foot to tho 

East line of Lot 1 In said Zollngor's Apple Ridge 

Subdivision; thence North on said East line ol Lot 1 and 

said East lino extended Northerly to a lino 495 feet South 

of and parallel to Iho North line of said East Fractional 

Half; thence East on said last mentioned line to a point 

217.5 feet West ol the East line of tho West half of 

Govomment Lot 2 of the East Fractional Half aforesaid; 

thence South on a line parallot with said East lino of the 

West half of Lot 2 of the East Fractional Half aforesaid to 

tho point of beginning, in Lake County, Illinois. 

PARCEL 2 : That part of Lot "A" of Oakwood KnoBs UnA 

No. 3, being a Subdivision of part of the East Half of 

Fractional Section 5, Township 46 North, Range 10, East 

of the Third Principal Meridian, according to the plat 

thereof recorded December 16, 1954 as Document 

848772, In Book 33 of Plats, page 17, tying East of the 

East line of Lot 1 extended South In Zellngor's Apple 

Ridge Subdivision recorded In Book *L* ot Plats, page 60, 

and West. of a lino 21 7.5 feet West of the East Ine of the 

West half of Government Lot 2 of the East Fractional Half 

of Section 5 aforesaid, as measured along tho North lino 

of Zollngor's Lane In said Zollngor's Apple Ridge 

Subdivision, In Lake County, Illinois. 

Petitioner Is requesting a variation to the side yard 

requirement within Section 150.074-E, (ref. to Sec. 

150.072-E-2), of the Art loch Zoning Ordinance. This 

ordinance section requires a side yard on each sldo of ten 

percent of the lot width and a combined total of twelve feet. 

Petitioner proposos to conslruct an attached garage, 

measuring approximately 22 feet by 24 feet, as depict od 

on the site plan sketch submitted with the pelllon. The 

garage Is to bo placed 3-1 r from the property One on the 

East side, South comer of the house. The existing 

detached garage, sRuated 10 feet back ot the front 

property line is proposed to be demolished. 

Thursday, May 9, 1996 

7:45 P.M. 

Board Room, Village Han, 
874 Main Street 
Antioch, IL 60002 
All persons desiring to appear and be hoard thereon for or against sakf peti- 
tion may appear at said hearing and be heard. . - 
Barbara Johnson 0496C-7B9-AR 
Planning & Zoning Board April 19, 1996 



REQUEST: 



PROPOSAL 



DATE: 

TIME: 
PLACE: 



. 



. f • 



Uk" 



,..-. t - -Jf-r-. 



- - » M. * ■ .*— f»---«#Ur* + *rf •- * 



■ . . ■ ■ f - f 

Ap«U 19, 1996 LAkfUNd Newspapers 





COURAGE prepares active summer 



ALECJUNGE 

Staff Reporter 

A community based anti-gang organization is work- 
ing to provide many summer events for its members. 

Community Outreach Uniting Residents 
Against Gang Environment (COURAGE) is planning 
a rolicrbladlng event on April 26 from 0:30-11:30 
p.m. at the Waterford Commons Shopping Center 
on Grass Lake Road In Lindenhurst 

"It's an event for teens and families," said Linda 
Bergln of COURAGE. 

There will be plenty of games. Music will be pro- 
vided by an area DJ. The event is free. 

COURAGE is a combination of teens and adults 
from Antioch, Grayslake, Lake Villa and 
Lindenhurst who arc doing their part to combat 
and discourage gang activity. The teen groups 
meets weekly on Thursday nights from 6:30-8 p.m. 



The age group is 13-18. 

The teens usually have one night a month to attend 

a movie. 

An adult group meets bimonthly. Usually the 
group presents a speaker discussing a particular 
topic relating to gangs. 

Members of COURAGE attended a gang semi- 
nar in Waukcgan last week as well. 

In addition the teen group is planning a variety 
of summer events. 

The events include a possible Whitewater rafting 
excursion in July, a camping trip in June and a trip 
to an area water park sometime in the summer. 

Also on the list of possibilities is a roping and 
rappeling day. "It helps build teamwork and trust," 
Bergln said. 

For information about COURAGE, or for direc- 
tions to the teen meetings, call Bergln at 356-6788. 



Antioch Rescue Squad members Diane Norton and Stephanie 
Ruperd spoke to the Antioch Junior Woman's Club about CPR and 
the Heimlich maneuver. From left, Cindy Baba, Ruperd, Horton 
and Sharon Oldenburger. 

Antioch Junior Woman's Club 
bags lunches for homeless 



Jaycees elect leaders, set new meeting date 



As the picnic season 
approaches, members of the 
Antioch Junior Woman's Club are 
bagging their lunches, April 21. 

But they are giving their 
bagged lunches to the Public 
Action to Deliver Shelter (PADS) 
at United Methodist Church as 
the do-good organization cele- 
brates a "Sack Luncheon Day." 

The Antioch Junior Woman's 
Club hopes to provide 36 sacked 
lunches for homeless people 
spending the night at the shelter 
April 21. 

"Each will get a sandwich, a 
juice box, a bag of chips, fruit and 
dessert," said Amy Winters, co- 
chair of the Services Committee. 

Winters said the shelter 
already had dinner planned for 
the homeless people staying 
there, so the club decided to do 
something a little extra by provid- 
ing a lunch. 

"We just wanted to do some- 
thing," Winters said. 

Funds to buy the lunch food 
were made available through last 
year's successful backpack drive 
at Christmas time. The club 
raised donations to buy back- 
packs for PADS. At the same time, 
the club filled the backpacks with 
various necessities that the 
homeless people could carry with 
them. 

"Everybody was so generous 
with the backpack drive that we 
were able to provide funds for 
this (Sack Luncheon)," Winters 
said. 

• In other club business, the 
deadline for the $500 scholarship 
to attend the College of Lake 
County Is April 15. Candidates 
must live in Antioch and be a full- 
time student at CLC. 

• The last general meeting will 
be held May 14 at Paradise Cove 
in Johnsburg. Newly elected offi- 
cers will be sworn in at that time. 



rWRiTE Usi 

Lakeland Newspapers 
wants to hear news of 
local sporting events, 
clubs, organizations, etc. 
Black and white photos 
are also welcome. Please 
send news items to 
Claudia M. Lenart 30 S. 
Whitney, Grayslake, 
60030 or call 223-81 61. 



• The club will provide volun- 
teer assistance when the Antioch 
Fire Department holds its pan- 
cake breakfast and open house 
June 30. 

• The Junior Woman's Club 
will sponsor a concession stand 
during July 4 activities. 

• Club members will also 
serve as volunteers during the 
Antioch lions Club barbecue and 
auction Aug. 4. Proceeds from the 
auction benefit the Antioch 
Rescue Squad. 

• Meetings for the general 
membership will commence 
again Sept 9. 

"We try to keep busy, and 
we're always looking for new 
members with new ideas," said 
Winters, who is president-elect of 
the club. 

For more information about 
the Antioch Junior Woman's 
Club, call 395-2209.— by KEVIN 
HANRAHAN 



New blood will be taking over 
the leadership positions for the 
Antioch Jaycees. 

The do-good group held Its 
officer elections as it heads into 
the summer months. Elected 
office holders include: 

• John Sykcs of Grayslake, 
president; 

• Greg Benyak of Round Lake 
Reach, management vice presi- 
dent; 

• Ed Kanabay of Antioch, 
membership vice president; 

• Joel Johnson of Kenosha, 
Wis., community develoment 
vice president; 

• Robert Sykcs of Lindenhurst, 
individual development vice 
president; 

• Donna Bcrgl of Antioch, sec- 
retary; 

• Tcri Chi pm an of Genoa City, 
Wis., treasurer; 

• Brian Stoddard of Antioch, 
state director representative; 

• Marlene Olsen of Antioch, 
local director; 

• Christine Czerkies of Fox 
Lake, assistant local director. 

Tm excited because we have 
a full board for the first time in a 
couple of years," noted Stoddard, 



the outgoing president 

"They're a good group. I think 
we can look forward to bigger and 
better things ahead," Stoddard 
said. 

The Jaycees will be changing 
their meeting date to the second 
Wednesday of the month from 
May to September. The meeting 
will be held at 7:30 p.m. at the 
Regency Inn. A social will follow 
at the Sand Bar. 

During the regional Jaycees 
meeting, the Antioch chapter 
walked away with numerous 
award. Regional President Marie 



Klanang presented the awards. 

The Antioch Jaycees was 
named the "Outstanding Chapter 
for the month of March. 

Olsen was named the 
"Outstanding Jaycee" of the third 
quarter for the region. Olsen was 
instrumental in organizing the 
Bowl-A-Thon which helped raise 
about $3,000 to send three 
Antioch children with disabilities 
to summer camp. 

John Sykcs was named 
"Outstanding Jaycee" for the 
month of March.— by KEVIN 
HANRAHAN 



ACHS, Lakeland Newspapers 
hope to "Make A Difference' 



Antioch Community High 
School and Lakeland Newspapers 
are teaming up for the "You Make a 
Difference Scholarship" drive. 

Through the subscription fund 
raiser, "You Make A Difference" 
scholarships will be available to grad- 
uating students planning to attend a 
2- or 4-year college, trade school or 
vocational technical school. 

Eligibility includes those stu- 
dents who have been nominated by 



the high school's "You Make a 
Difference" program which fea- 
tures students who have made an 
impact in their school or in the 
community. 

Lakeland Newspapers will 
donate $5 for every new subscrip- 
tion and $3 for every renewal sub- 
scription to the scholarship. 

More than 80 students will vol- 
unteer for a telephone subscription 
drive April 27-28. 



April 
1996 



swfcs ■■■ 





■ 



Lakeland 



: :i 



Newspapers 



. •■ 



Friday 



19 



8 a.m.- Lindenhursfs New 
4 p.m. Generations Child 
Development 
Center summer pro- 
gram registration 
continues during 
weekdays in April. 
Call 265-0101 



Tuesday 



23 



9:30 a.m.- Antioch United 
2:30 p.m. Methodist Church 
holds Parents Day 
Out for infants to 5- 
year-olds. Call 395- 
1259 

7 p.m. Women's Club 

holds bingo at Civic 
Center 



Saturday 



20 



8 a.m. Earth Day clean-up 
project east of 
Skidmore Drive/ 
Antioch 

7 p.m. Irish American Club 
Spring Dinner 
Dance at Olde 
Stratford Hall, 
Grayslake. Call 
973-1 656 or 740- 
0065 



Sunday 



21 



1 1 a.m. Shut-In Mass for the 
handicapped at St. 
Peter's Social 
Center, Antioch 



24 



Wednesday 

9:30 a.m.- Antioch United 
2:30 p.m. Methodist Church 
holds Parents Day 
Out for infants to 5- 
year-olds. Call 395- 
1259 

7 p.m. TOPS Hake Pounds 
Off Sensibly) meets 
at Holy Family 
Church, Lake Villa. 
Call 587-1422 or 
587-5994 



Thursday 



25 



7:30 p.m. Lake Region 

Historical Society 
meets at museum, 
812 Main St., 
Antioch 

7:30 p.m. Irish American Club 
meets at State Bank 
of the Lakes in 
Antioch. Call 395- 
3942 



Monday 



8 a.m.- 
noon 



22 



7 p.m. 



Free blood pres- 
sure screening at 
Victory Lakes 
Continuing Care 
Center, Linden- 
hurst. Call 356- 
5900 

Rational 
Recovery meets 
at Antioch 
Manor Apts., 445 
Donin Dr. 



Coming Up: 



April 27 



May 1 



Antioch Arbor 
Day Committee 
tree giveaway at 
North Park 

Northern Lake 
County Qui Iter's 
Guild meets at 
State Bank of the 
Lakes, Linden- 
hurst at 7 p.m. 



ieift£OMETW:NgaCCai^ 



V"! " '-'-" 




t] COMMUNITY UkcUr«l Newspapers April 19, 1996 





r m 




Reddy Rider visits Emmons School. From left, Reddy Rider, David 
Steffenhagen of Country Companies, Douglas Mouradian and 
Brian Oster. 

Students tune in to 'Bike Time' 



Anniversary - 

Delmar and Laurabelle Church 

Del mar and Laurabelle (nee Mcnzcl) Church 
of Antioch were married May 3, 1936 In Wood- 
stock, III, They will be celebrating their 60th 
anniversary on May 5 at the Richmond Ameri- 
can Legion with an open house from 2 to 5 p.m. 
During their 60 years of marriage they raised 
seven children: William of Mundelcin; Kenneth 
(Joan) of Zion; Joyce (Ncls) Reese of Lake Villa; 
Jan (Bob) Kubiclci of Virginia; Del (Leslie) 
Church, Jr. of Antioch; Keith (Renee) of Antioch; 
and Mlcca (David) Meyer of Lindenhurst 

The Church's have 14 grandchildren and five 
great-grandchildren. 

Delmar is a retired carpenter, and Laurabelle 
is a retired homemaker, They have been charter 
members of All Saints Lutheran Church in Fox 
Lake for 35 years. 




McHenry County Defenders hold plant sale 



Children and bicycles can be 
a deadly combination. The Na- 
tional Safety Council reports 
riders 14 years or younger 
account for 40 percent of all 
bicycle deaths. 

Students at Emmons Grade 
School and Grass Lake Grade 
School learned how to protect 
themselves and become safe 
bike riders on April 4 by seeing 
the bicycle safety video "Bike 
Time." "Bike Time" Is an 
educational program produced 
by the Country Companies 



R E 


/Vl |' 


lt<t}':0 e 


F<. . . . 


THE 


NEW AREA 


CODE 


FOR- 


OUR 


AREA- IS (847) 



insurance group for children 
and starring children. The 
bicycle safety program was 
presented by Dan Gcrber, a 
safety education specialist with 
the insurance group, and ar- 
ranged by County Companies 
Agent David Steffenhagen. 

"Bike Time" was produced 
with the help of Illinois State 
University's Dept. of 

Curriculum and Instruction, 
the Illinois Dept. of 
Transportation and the Bicycle 
Federation of America. 

"Bike Time" is a continua- 
tion of the Country Companies 
insurance group's 35-year 
commitment to health and 
safety. 



The Wildflower Preservation 
and Propagation Committee of 
the McHenry County Defenders 
will be holding their annual wild- 
flower plant sale on Sunday, May 
5 from 1 to 4 p.m. The sale will be 
held at the McHenry County 
College Cafeteria, Rtc. 14, Crystal 
Lake. No plants will be sold 
before 1 p.m. 

Both prairie plants and wood- 
land plants will be Included in 
the sale. The committee feels 
that selling wildflower plants 
which it knows have been propa- 
gated from seed and not dug 
from the wild is one way in which 
it can contribute to its primary 
goal — that of preserving native 
wildflowers. Prairie seed will also 
be available. 

Persons attending the sale 





INSURANCE 

Michelle L. Wolf 

1724 E. Grand Ave. 

Lindenhurst 

(847) 356-3353 



Like a good neighbor, 
State Farm Is there.® 

Slate Farm Insurance Companies 
Home Ollices: Btoomington, Illinois 



IAKES AREA COMMUNITY BAND 
4th ANNUAL POPS CONCERT 

Sunday, May 5th, 1996 • 3 p.m. 

Antioch Community High School 

1133 Main Street 

(Rte. 83 North of Rte. 173) Antioch, Illinois 

ADMISSION 

Advanced $5,00 Adults, $6.00 at the door 
$3.00 Seniors & Students, $4.00 at the door 

ADVANCE TICKETS WAV BE PURCHASED AT: 

First National Bank of Antioch, 485 Lake St., Antioch 

Lakes Area Music Store, 911 Main St., Antioch 

Lindenhurst Park District, 2200 Grass Lake Rd.. Lindenhurst 

"LACB Is associated with Lindenhurst Park District* 





Come Worship With Us 

A Directory Of Antioch Area Churches 



Qracolarvd Baptist Church. 258 Ida Si, Antioch, IL 
Sunday School 11 a.m., morning Worship 11 am., 
Sunday Evening 7 p.m. Robert Williams, Pastor 

First Church of Chritt, Sdarrlitt & Reading Rm. Rte 
173 and Harden, Antioch, Phone (847) 395-1196. Sunday 
School. Sunday Church Service 1030 a.m. Wednesday. 
8 p.m. 

Calvary Baptist Church. 554 Parkway. Phone 
(847) 395-3303. Sunday School 10 a.m., Sunday 
Worship 11 a.m, and 7 p.m. 

St IgnatiM Episcopal 077 Main si, Phone 

(847) 395-065Z Low Mass 7:30 am., High Mass 9:30 

a.m. Sunday Shcool 4 Nureory 9:30 a.m. 

Antioch Evsngslical FrM Church. 42429 N. Tiffany Rd. 
Phone (847) 395-4117. Sunday School 9;45 ajn.. 
Sunday Worship 8:30. 1 1:00, 6:00, Children's Church 11 
a.m. Nursery both services. Awana Club. 

SL Stephen Lutheran Church. Hillside & Rte. 59. 
Phone (847) 395-3359. Sunday Worship, 8, 9:15 & 
10:30. Church School 9 am. , Sunday. The Rev. Charte» 
E. Miller, Pastor. 

' Christian Ufa Fellowship Assemblies of Ood Church. 
4 1625 Deep Lake Rd., Antioch. Phone (847) 395-8572, 
Sunday School ( all ages) 9 am., Sunday morning 
Worship 10 am., Children's Church 10 a.m., Sunday 
Evening Worship 6:30 p.m., Wodnosday Worship & 
Children's Program 7 am., Tuas, Women's Fellowship & 
Bible Study 9-11:30 am. Jell Brussaly, Pastor. 



Faith Evangelical Lutheran. 1275 Main St. Phono 
(847) 395-1600. Sunday worship 8 & 10:30 a.m., Sunday 
School 925 am., Mon. 7 p.m. Rov. Oarald Qruon, Rev. 
Gregory Hermanson, Pastors, Christian Day Shcool 
(847) 359-1664. 



Mllbum Congregational United Church of Christ 
Grass Lake Rd. at Rte. 45 Phone (847) 356-5237. 
Sunday service 10 a.m. Children's program 10 am. Rov, 
Paul R. Meltzer, Pastor. 

UnHed Methodist Church of Antioch. 848 Main SL 
Phone (647) 359-1259. Worship 6:30 & 10 a.m.: 
Fellowship Time 9:30 a.m.; Sunday School 10 am. The 
Rev. Kurt A. Gamlln, Pastor, 

St Pater"* Church. 557 W, Lake Si. Anttoch. Phono 
(847) 395-0274. Masses weekdays, 7:15 & 6 a.m., 
Sunday 8:30, 8, 8:30, 11 am. & 12:15 p.m. Saturday 
5:30 p.m. Pastor Rev. Father lawrenoo Hanley. 

Chain of Lakes Community Bible Church. 23201 W. 
Grass Lake Rd., Antioch, Phone (847) 838-0103 Sunday 
Worship 8:15 and 10:45. Sunday School 9:45. Children's 
Church 10:45. Youth, Women's, Awana & Small Group 
ministries. Senior Pastor, Rev, Don Sweeting. 

Good Shepherd Luthem Church (Missouri Synod), 
25100 W. Grand Ave. (Rtw. 59 & 132). Lake Villa, 
(647) 356-5158. Sunday Worship 8:15 4 10:45 a.m.; 
Sunday School (3 and up) and Bible Study 9:30 a.m. 
Rev. John Zollmer, Pastor, Christian Preschool. 




L 



Dan Dugenske, Director 
This Directory Presented As A Community Service By 

Strang Funeral Home of Antioch 



should enter the college campus 
at the traffic light, bear right, and 
enter the main entrance near the 



Conference Center. 
Usts of plants available will be 
distributed at the door. 



Foundation dusts off walking shoes 



The Fifth Annual Walkathon 
to benefit the no-kill animal shel- 
ter operated by the Asslsi Animal 
Foundation takes place on 
Sunday, April 28, at the White Tail 
Prairie day use area of Moraine 
Hills State Park. 

All arc invited to participate as 
walkers, or as sponsors of a walk- 
er for the animals. The six kilome- 






^\ 



ter walk is through a lovely area of 
the park and promises a morning 
of healthful exercise in good 
company. 

Sign-ins start at 9 am., with 
the walk commencing at 10 a.m. 
promptly. 

For information, call Event 
Chairperson, Mrs. Jordan at 854- 
7313. 



® 



^ViewS On 
Cental Healtti 

By Brian Gniadek, D.D.S. 

fffe WE NOW HAVE INTRA ORAL CAMERA 

^^? You Can See The Real CondrJon of Your Teeth On T.V. 

WHAT IS A DENTAL ONLAY? 

Onlays are essentially large fill- 
ings. The term "onlay" is used 
when a substantial portion of the 
tooth crown needs to be replaced. 
Onlays are used to restore teeth 
severely damaged either by decay 
or wear. Since they are often sub- 
jected to heavy chewing pressures, 
they must be made of very durable 
material. In most instances, this 
means gold or some other cast 
metal that can withstand chewing 
pressures without shattering or 
deforming. Porcelain is sometimes 
used. It has the advantage of 
matching the tooth in color, but it 
tends to be brittle and may eventu- 
ally "leak" around the edges. 



The use of metal onlays is gener- 
ally limited to the back teeth, 
where they are not so visible. The 
are fabricated, inserted, and 
cemented in place just like cast 
metal filings. It is considered to be 
a superior type of restoration when 
excessive wear or a difficult bite 
are encountered. It has greater 
strength than a conventional fill- 
ing, yet requires less loss of tooth 
structure than a crown. 

From the office of: 

LincJeo Family Dental Center 

2056 E. Grand Ave. 

Lindenhurst 

265-9070 



*^T GREAT LAKES 
FOOT & ANKLE CENTER 

"Discover Our Gentle Touch For Tender Feet" 



Initial Consultation 

(Upon Request) 



Does Not Include X-Ray Or Treatment 

•Bunions 
•Hammertoes 
•Heel Pain 
•Ingrown Toe Nails 
•Ankle Sprains 
•Warts 
•Fractures 
•Coras/Calluses 



?;-'■■ 



.'■'-'! 



O^l 






Paul T. Basile, DPM John L. Bostanche, DPM 

PAUL ¥. BASIUE, DPM: 
JOHN LU BOSYANCHE, DPM* 



LASER 

■ SURGERY. 



Fullow Am erlcan Hoard of Ambulatory Foot Surgery 

AModiioi, American College of Foot & AnWo Surgery •Board Cortlfiad . 

American BowdPodiiUtcSurBiiy 

2 East Rollins Rd. • Suite 2 • Round Lake Beach 
(Condell Acute Care Center) 



i 



h Vi 



,: '-. 



I I . IMI UIJ 



■MP 



. I . - -i 



Ap»iM9, 1996 Ukelwd NewspApcas COMMUNITY jj jjg] 



Long line for new post office 



KEVIN HANRAHAN 

Staff Reporter 

A new U.S. Post Office for 
Antioch will not be in the mak- 
ing any time soon, according to 
Mayor Marilyn Shincflug. 

Antioch will just have to wait 
in line — a very long line, she 
said. 

Antioch is, numbered in the 
140s, Shincflug said, as far as 
the list goes for villages waiting 
to encourage the federal gov- 
ernment to build new post 
offices for their towns. 

"I would say at the moment 



the post office is not planning 
on moving," Shincflug said. 
"We're not anywhere near the 
top of the list as far as actually 
building a post office— and 
that's only the first list" 

Ideally, a prospective site for 
a new post office would be in 
the area between Main Street 
and the new train station being 
built on Depot Street, Shincflug 
said. 

She noted that the village is 
planning to build a new 7-acre 
park along Skidmorc Drive and 
that there may still be land 



available in the area to develop 
for a future post office. 

Shincflug also dispelled 
rumors of a new post office 
being built in the former Globe 
store, which has remained 
vacant 

She said the rear of the 
Globe store would not be suit- 
able for post office vehicles to 
maneuver, and she said the 
large size of the building would 
require extra security. 

"Building a new post office 
certainly is not within our con- 
trol," Shincflug said. 



'Take Child to Work Day' set for April 25 



The Antioch Rotary Club is 
calling the attention of students 
and working parents to the annu- 
al "Take Your Child To Work Day" 
April 25. 

The event began several years 
ago as an opportunity to invite 
girls into the work place. The day 
has now expanded to include all 
children. 

"Our young people can gain a 
new perspective on what the 
work world is really like if they 
have first-hand experience and 
observe what their parents do all 
day long," noted Matt Tabar, 
Superintendent of Emmons 
School and chairperson of voca- 
tional education for the Antioch 
Rotary Club. 

He added that one of the goals 
of Rotary is to promote informa- 
tion about vocational service. 

Tabar said Regional 
Superintendent Ed Gonwa has 
lent his support for the special 
day and is encouraging schools to 
participate. Most schools will 
allow students to participate in 
this day as an excused absence. 

There arc two ways to partici- 
pate. One is to make provisions 



Public Notice of Draft NPDES Permit 
Public Notice Number DGN/96030802.psj 

Public Notice b hereby given by Illinois 
EPA, " Division of Water Pollution 
Control, Permit Section, 2200 
Churchhill Road, P.O. Box 19276, 
Springfield, IL 62794-9276 {herein 
Agency) that a draft National Pollutant 
Discharge System (NPDES) Permit 
Number IL0020354 has been prepared 
under 40 CFR 124.6(d) for Village of 
Antioch, B74 Main St., Antioch, IL 
60002 for discharge Into Sequoit Creek 
from the Antioch W.T.F., 796 Holbek Dr., 
Antioch, IL 60002. 

This facility provides treatment of 
wastewater generated within its service 
area. 

The application, draft permit, and other 
documents are available for Inspection 
and may be copied at the Agency 
between 9:30 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. 
Monday through Friday. A Fact Sheet 
containing more detailed Information Is 
available at no charge. For further Infor- 
mation call the Public Notice Clerk at 
217-782-0610. Interested persons are 
Invited to submit written comments on 
the draft permit to the Agency at the 
above address. The NPDES Permit and 
Public Notice numbers must appear on 
each comment page. All comments 
received by the Agency not later than 
30 days from the date of this publica- 
tion shall be considered In making the 
final decision regarding permit 
Issuance. 

Any Interested persorvmay submit writ- 
ten request for a public hearing on the 
draft permit, stating their name and 
address, the nature of the issues pro- 
posed to be raised and the evidence 
proposed to be presented with regard 
to these Issues In the hearing. Such 
requests must be received by the 
Agency not later than 30 days from the 
date of this publication. 

If written comments and/or requests 
Indicate a significant degree of inter- 
est In the draft permit, the permitting 
authority may, at Its discretion, hold a 
public hearing. Public notice will be 
given 30 days before any public hear- 
ing. 



for your child to spend the day 
with you. The other way is to 
allow your employees the oppor- 
tunity to bring their children to 
work April 25. 

• In a related matter, the 
Antioch Rotary Club proclaimed 
the Senior Career Shadowing 
Day a success. 

During the day, seniors from 
Antioch Community High School 
arc matched with business pro- 
fessionals in which students 
spend the whole day with the 
professional in a work situation. 



"They get a feel for what the 
job is really like in an area they 
arc considering for future 
employment," noted Tabar. 

This year, 90 students fol- 
lowed 48 individuals in various 
business fields. Among the fields 
represented included automo- 
tive, banking, child care, con- 
struction, medical, education, 
fire prevention, law enforcement, 
property management, and 
nuclear power. — by KEVIN HAN- 
RAHAN 




Check the Classified Section Each 
Week when Looking for a New Job 



[ 



Singing for their heart's content 

Ryan Kessler, 7, Antioch and Wesley Laudenslager, 8, 
Lindenhurst, take a little break from jump roping for the 
American Heart Association at Oakland School and entertain 
the class with some song and dance. — Photo by Linda 
Chapman 




Give us 

18 months 

we'll give you 435 of these. 

(Or more for a larger deposit!) 




Let your hard-eamed money work for you I 
Start saving for that vacation to Tahiti or 
tor the down payment on your next car - 
and let the interest you earn pay for it. 

We're now offering one of the most 
competitive CD rates in Chicagoland to 
help you reach your goals. Stop by one of 
our 17 suburban locations and start earning! 
Hurry -- this offer expires April 30th, 1996. 



Brand 

NATIONAL BANK 



265VirginaSt 

Crystal Lake, II 60014 

(815)459-4600 



lOOOMchtenryAve 

Crystal Lake, I! 60014 

(815) 477-5390 



4840 Grand Ave 

Gumee, II 60031 

(847) 244-6620 



7500 West Grand Ave 

Gurnee. II 60031 

(847) 265-2100 



3 Nelson C White Pkwy 7100 West Oakton St. 
Mundelein, II 60060 Nites, II 60714 

(847) 970-5010 (847)967-5300 



486 West Liberty St 2323 West Grand Ave 

Wauconda, II 60084 Waukegan, II 60085 

(B47) 526-6604 (847) 623-9000 



229 East State Rd 

Island Lake, II 60042 

(847) 526-1766 

3431 Sunset Fid 

Waukegan, II 60087 

(647) 623-9000 



'Annual percentage yield Penalty for early withdrawal This offer Is not valid on cither promotional CDs, IRAs or Investment* 

$100,000 maximum deposit per famiy. No broker or municipal deposits accepted. 

Otter expires Apnl 30, 1 996. Grand National Bank reserves i he right to cancel and withdraw this offer at any time 



Member 
FDIC 







3 COMMUNITY UlcrlANtl Newspapers ApiiiL 1 9, 1 996 




Rules of the road 

Dan Cerber, from Country Companies in Lake Villa, explains 
the importance of bike safety to a class at Grass Lake School 
in Antioch. — Photo by Linda Chapman 



Volling 



From page Al 

especially if Abbott has a six- to seven-story building," Volling said. 

"The new homes being built arc also larger." 

Foremost, Volling intends to maintain the department's aggressive 
training program. In fact, Volling initiated the department's dive team. 
Antioch firefighters also train for confined spaces rescue, high-angle 
rescue, below ground rescue, and as paramedics. 

"We have never turned down our guys for new training," Volling 
said. "If there's a new type of rescue, we'll send our guys to get 
involved." 

He also plans to maintain good relations with the six fire depart- 
ments (Lake Villa, Round Lake, Fox Lake, Grayslakc, and Newport) in 
the northern quadrant of the county. Together the six departments 
have pooled their money to purchase a mass casualty trailer and a 
mobile kitchen to serve firemen and victims on fire scenes. 

"It eliminates duplication. It's too expensive for one department to 
buy these vehicles that it would use twice a year," Volling noted. The 
same pooling of resources is also used for training. 

Rctwcen fire duties, Volling also manages the family-owned busi- 
* ncss, Antioch Electric Services Inc. 

Hcing a fireman, especially a volunteer fireman, is rare breed. 

"It's a job you want to do," Volling as he looks to his new role as fire 
chief. 



Tiffany 



i 



u 






i..t 



Carney 

Prom nnon Al V 



From page Al 
away his helmet and boots April 
30 when he effectively resigns 
from the fire department and dis- 
trict. 

During the past half century, 
Carney marks only the third chief 
for the fire department Before 
Carney's tenure (1907-1996), for- 
mer chief Todd Maplethorpc 
served for 21 years, and 
Simonscn served another 20-plus 
years before Maplethorpc. 

Over the last 35 years, Carney 
has watched the Antioch Fire 
Department and the First Fire 
Protection District of Antioch 
Township grow Into one of the 
premiere and best-equipped 
departments in northern Illinois. 
When he came aboard in 
1961, the three-bay fire depart- 
ment was stationed out of the 
current village hall. In 1977, the 
department moved into its pre- 
sent building with nine bays, 
including four separate bays for 
the Antioch Rescue Squad. 

"We thought wc would never 
fill this one, and we're already 
full," Carney said. 

Not only that, but the fire- 
fighters arc much better 
equipped to battle fires today 
than they were yesteryear. They 
have gone from rubber coats to 

$1,000 fire resistant clothing. 

"We've come a long way," 
Carney said. "Wc didn't have air 
masks and tanks in the old days. 
We just went into a house eating 
smoke." 

Furthermore, the 50-plus 
corps of fire-fighting volunteers 
that Carney has led for the last 
nine years is among the most 



educated and trained. They are 
experts in various specialized 
areas, from dive team specialists 
to high-angle rescue specialists to 
life-saving paramedics. In fact, 
Carney spearheaded the aggres- 
sive training program for the 
department when It became 
state-certified back in 1971 when 
he was a lieutenant. 

"Like everything: Education is 
the answer, from training, public 
awareness to fire prevention pro- 
grams," Carney noted. 

lie also proudly notes that his 
the volunteers arc paid only $9 an 
hour when they arc on call. Last 
year, the department paid out 
$64,000 in salaries to 50-plus vol- 
unteers on call. 

In fact, Carney remembers his 
first salary of $80. 

"We only pay our guys once a 
year, usually around October or 
November," Carney said. "It's not 
much, but it It's like a Christmas 
bonus." 

To compensate, Carney 
worked for Commonwealth 
Edison where he just retired after 
35 years of service with the elec- 
tric company. 

What the department saves in 
salaries, it spends for the best and 
most up-to-date equipment. 
From fire engines to pumper 
engines to grass fire vehicles to 
command cars, the Antioch Fire 
Department has it all, except for 
maybe a high-ladder truck. 

"When you don't have to 
spend tax dollars to hire people, 
you can spend it on equipment," 
Carney said. "We're fortunate." 

But there is nothing volunteer 



about the professionalism of the 
force and being able to handle all 
the equipment, however. 

"We've always prided our- 
selves on our response time," 
Carney said. "The first truck is 
usually on the road in two min- 
utes or less. Not many paid 
departments can beat that." The 
district is also one of the largest 
in Lake County witli a 34- square - 
mile coverage area, and it 
responds to 500 calls annually. 

Spending money on public 
education and fire awareness has 
paid dividends though, he noted. 

"I may be exaggerating a bit, 
but it seemed like wc were 
responding to at least two house 
fires a week," said Carney, 
reflecting on the last 35 years. "If 
I have seen anything in 30 years, 
I've seen a reduction in fire loss 
which is attributable to fire pre- 
vention and education." 

Although Carney may be 
resigning his post as chief, don't 
expect his helmet and boots to 
get dusty in his closet. He may 
escape to his cottage near the 
Wisconsin Dells from time to 
time, but being a fire volunteer is 
in his blood. 

"I'm not going to quit total- 
ly," Carney said. "I'm still going 
to volunteer." 

— Wrjte Us— 



Lake In nd Newspapcis wants to hear 
news of local sporting events, clubs, 
organizations, etc. Black and white 
photos arc also welcome. Please send 
news items to Claudia M. Lcnart 30 S. 
Whitney, Grayslakc, 60030 or call 
223-8161. 



Life Skills Series 



Life Skills presentations are hosted by the mental health 

professionals of Saint Therese Medical Center. 

The programs are free and will be held at Saint Therese at 7 p.m. 

To register call 847-360-2280. 




From page Al 

"I believe the plan is exactly in line with the comprehensive plan of 
the village . . . There will be no multi-family and no apartments," Cason 
said. The comprehensive plan calls for exactly 414 units. 

Phil Burgdorf argued that the density is much higher than Cason 
described. Taking into account retention ponds, roads and parks, 
Burgdorf noted that there arc approximately 95 buiidablc acres, which 
equates to more than 4 homes per acre. 

Ed Koziorowski, a former zoning board member and school board 
member for Antioch High School, urged the board to lower the densi- 
ty by demanding larger lots or through estate zoning. 

"If it was ail buiidablc, I could understand, but it's not," said 
Koziorowski, who said the development could produce 900 students to 
local schools. 

Robert Silhan, director of planning, zoning and building, explained 
that the new zoning ranges from R-l to R-3 which falls within the zon- 
ing at approximately 2.9 units per acre. 

Jim Port al ski, a zoning board member, said the development could 
be worse under the existing zoning on the property which could have 
apartments on portions of the land. 

""* "Another developer cold come in here and build," Portalski 
warned, "and wc would not have the opportunity to oppose a new 
developer if he came in here." 

Ladies Aid Society serves dinner 

Roast beef cafeteria dinner Grass Lake Road, Mill burn. 

will be served to the public by the Donation is $6 for adults; $3 for 

Millbum Ladies Aid Society children ages 5 and older; free for 

Thursday, May 2 at noon at the those under 5. Tickets may pur- 

Millbum Congregational United chased at the door. For further 

Church of Christ Rte. 45 and Information, call 356-8160. 



Apr. 



Wednesday 4/24 Motivating Yourself to Make Changes in Your Life 

-DaunBlain,M.S. ) C.SAD.C. 



May 



Wednesday 5/1 National Anxiety Disorders Screening Day 

Wednesday 5/8 Assessment and Treatment of Mood Disorders in Women 

- Elizabeth de Sa Pererira, M.D. 

Wednesday 5/22 Stress Management for Working Moms - Karen Gassiday. Pn.n. 




Saint Therese Medical Center 



A Division of Ff i nc iscan SlHm 
I If a I ili Ore Corporation 

2615 Washington Street 
Waukegan, Illinois 60085 
Telephone 847.2493900 



1»U 





BUILDER 




.. 




1 COMMUNITY LaIceIancJ Newspapers Apuil 19, 1996 






i (-""V 7 ^ 



°r/ "^ 




<$ 





IT.'jSB 



'ftfe 



FFl® 



<s? 









On The In 



The Internet is an enjoyable and useful source of 
information for many people. However, if you 
have any experience with it, you know how fast 
those usage bills can add up. That's why 
Lakeland netDIRECT offers you a local connec- 
tion - to let you spend more time browsing, less 
time paying high Internet usage bills. Call 
netDIRECT today and see what a difference a 
local phone call can make. Then go ahead, surf! 



,••• 



For More Information, Call: 

(847) 223-8199 



With Lakeland netDIRECT, you'll get 

• Local Phone Call For Over 30 Prefixes • Unlimited Use 

• Chat Groups • News Groups • E-Mail 
• Flat Fee of $25 • World Wide Web Access • Web Pages 

• Supports Up To 33.6 Modems 
• Discount Rates Available • Much More!!! 



E-Mail: service@lnd.com lakeland 

Visit us on the Internet: http://wwwlnd.com ^Q[t 

'Lakeland netDIRECT offers local phone charges lo most of the Lake County area. Call for Information about your prefix. 



DIRECT- 






i 



w 



LU 



' 1 



■■*• 



■ : 




LS5SFVT i >7; 



■.-■■ ■■■.,...■■■:-■ ;■. ;._■;,-■■ ' !".-; viilviT 1 " Si 





» 

SERVICE 






FURNITURE T.V._A|^riSg 



TUEy,,; ; 10-SPM? 

wed ; lo-apM^ ' 

THUR : . -10-e PM 

SAT ; 10-6 PM 

SUN^/'Kll-^PMo': 




DOUBLE RECLINING SOFA 



v .. ;»jSc. 



-+:•- 



1 t : 






• 




ALL RECLINERS REDUCED 



GRASS LKRD. 



GRAND AVE. 



ROLLINS RD. 



RT. 173 



V 



LAKE VILLA 265-0655 






Sf 




b'ei 



DOUBLE RECUNING SOFA FEATURING FOLD DOWN 
TABLE OAK WOOD ACCENTS AND STORAGE DRAWER 




W 







jr*x$ 








B f*iafiEI 



ne 



DRESSER - MIRROR - CHEST - HEADBOARD 







fptflN 

; EA.PC. 






" I II IFWTT 







WCfrT i 







BARGAIN 



DELUXE COUNTRY GROUP BUTTON-BACK 



43^ 




1 Ws£ 



QUEEN 

$ 89 

VEA^PC. 




FREE FRAME 

OH ANY 

PREMIUM SET 



k 



<£ 



ig 



m. 



COVE,, 




*■> 



.*r,j*i 



-X 




\>y 



&5&F 



DRESSER - MIRROR - CHEST - HEADBOARD 





ilk 1 |o 
Ssaa 



ffoar 







out 






M?£/g0 P/£ff NMU BLACK HAWK 

^._.^^^:.^.^_ ■ OAK BEDRttOMISJM 









.y 






iW ' MiM a <i fcft 



i& 



» 



. ■ .1 i g 



SALE $ 499 QUEEN 



CRAFTED IN OAKSOUD3 4 VENEERS. 
~;"7 - ; TvSSSS&V NO PARIKLE BOARD SET INCLUDES LIGHTED MIRRORED 

&Pmn. llfc *'3UL\B ^ BOOKCASE, HEAOBOAffP, 2 PfEW CABINETS 

SALE $ 899 QUEEN 

TH/S 6V H/QH OAK PIER WALL INCLUDES 
•BOOKCASE HEADBOARD *PIER MIRROR 

• LIGHT BRIDGE *(2) PIER CABINETS 
DRESSER AND CHEST ALSO SALE PRICED 

f i ^ »i' >i H B « ' m w »»u Mi ni itwm»»— tutuKant ■ 




Us 




T»|- 



— '«£rl"-£LT ,.*--l" 








Apail 1 9/ T 996 LaIceIancJ Newspadcrs COUNTY 




Forest preserve to vote .on adding 196 acres 



Acquisition would protect Grant Woods 



CLAUDIA M. LENART 



Regional Editor 

It stretches for 2 and one-half miles In 
northwestern Lake County and It's one of 
the Lake County Forest Preserve's most 
diverse sites. At the end of this month 
Grant Woods Is expected to grow, making 
It also one of the forest preserve district's 
largest sites. 

On April 26, the full forest preserve 
board will vote on acquiring 196 acres 
along Fairfield and Monaville roads and 
situated between the south and north 
Grant Woods sites. The $3.5 million acqui- 
sition has already been approved by the 
Acquisition, Development, Finance and 



Enterprise committees. 

Michael Fenclon, director of planning, 
conservation and development for the for- 
est preserve, described the proposed site 
as "an undulating, rolling piece of topogra- 
phy, broken up with blocks of oak and 
hickory. You don't get to sec all of the site 
at once." 

Suzl Schmidt, District 3 forest preserve 
commissioner and chairman of the acqui- 
sition committee, said the forest preserve 
has been interested in the site since 1989. 
The district wanted to buy the site at that 
time, however, the Village of Lake Villa, 
which has a say on land use within Its lim- 
its, would not approve the purchase. 



When Lake Villa approved the forest $17,000 per acre, 
preserve purchase of Sun Lake Forest "The price has gone up as all land has. 

Preserve in the area of Grass Lake Road, Wchad a very willing seller and it was a fair 
cast of Rtc. 83, it was agreed the Lake ==z= -^^^^^ = ^ ============= ^ 

Villa Township Baseball League /f -r, 7. ,r : , . . 77. 

could use 12 acres of the site for ( The Slte ts ) an Undulating, rolling 
Holds. That plan ran into years of piece of topography, broken Up 
unfruitful negotiations between the w j tn bhcks Q f Qak and hickory. 
village and forest preserve. Finally, a ., , ; .. > / / . 

compromise was reached. The vll- You OOn t get to See all Of the Site 
lagc would buy 12 acres of land near at Once/ 
Grant Woods and swap It with 12 
acres at Sun Lake. Thus, the village 
owns the baseball fields free of any 
forest preserve stipulations. 

Schmidt said she believes at ^~ ~ ^~~ 



— Michael Fenelon, 

director of planning 

Lake County Forest Preserve 



about $19,800 per acre, the acquisition is a price," said Schmidt "The site fits all the 

fair deal. She said the north part of Grant criteria." 

Woods was acquired in 1989 for about Sec ACRES page B2 



COUNTY 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



\ v 



K - 



THIS WEEK 

Democrats 
hopeful 

Political changes 
spur optimism 
PAGE B4 






Just one of 
those 'things' 

Marriott presents 
'New Yorkers' 
R\GEB9 

: 
■ 

life's A Bear 

Republican au^aigri 
a little 'buvoui' 
RAGEB18 

Applause for 
Paws 

Country bands throw 
hats in for animals 
R\GE6l8 



Movie 
Pick 

'Primal': 
slides despite 
high 'Gere' 
RAGE Bl 9 



& 




'Quality First' increases money to schools 



House passes Daniel's plan, 
money could come next fall 



RHONDA HETR1CK BURKE 

Editor in Chief 

In a move that could bring 
money to area school coffer's as 
early as next fall, the Illinois 
House of Representatives passed 
the "Quality First" Education 
Plan sponsored by House 
Speaker Lee Daniels (R-Addision) 
and forwarded it to the Senate for 
consideration. 

The House Is also considering 
wording for a referendum to be 
placed on the November ballot 
which would change the way 
schools arc funding throughout 
the state. 

"On its own this Is the most 
drastic and major plan brought 
forth on education to date," said 
State Rep. Tom Lachner (R-59th), 
who serves on the education 
committee. "This is really a good 
plan because It get immediate 
results to schools and each 
school district would see an 
Increase In per pupil funded from 
the state. It is not a funding plan 
but a major change in the way we 
support education In this state." 

The Quality First Education 
Plan will Increase school funding 
by $500 million without a tax 
Increase. Each school district will 
receive additional funding of 
$225 per pupil. Unit districts 
would receive $250 per pupil. 
Incentives will be provided to dis- 
tricts who consolidate for up to 
five years after consolidation. 
Amounts will be based on 1995 
average daily attendance. 



According to Lachner, this money 
could be used at the discretion of 
the local school board on any- 
thing the district needs with the 
exception of teacher's salaries. 

The plan is receiving bi-parti- 
san support because of its ability 
to Increase funding for districts 
and to restore additional local 
control to individual districts. 

"Hike the plan because it is a 
way to fund schools that Is going 
to pass the general assembly," 
said State Rep. Lauren Beth Gash 
(R-60th). "In our area we need 
adequate education funding for 
all schools. Absolute equity 
across the state is not possible at 
this time and the only way to 
make it possible is for taxpayers 
in our area to fund It This pro- 
vides additional funds to each 
district in the state." 

Other aspects of the plan 
Include: 

Establishing high quality 
academic standards Includ- 
ing: 

• exit exams for seniors, 
which must be passed to receive 
a high school diploma 

• replacing 1GAP (Illinois 
goals assessment program) test- 
ing with a different test adminis- 
tered at the 3rd, 6th, 8th and 12th 
grade level. 

Increasing local control 

• utilize block grants to 
improve flexibility 

• promote competition, 
innovation with Charter Schools 

• eliminate Goals 2000 



program mandates 

"As part of increasing 
local control, all holidays would 
become commemorative with 



the local school board setting 
their own calendar for days off," 
said Lachner. This could save 
See QU ALITV page B2 



Quality First 

$500 million increase for schools 
Where does the money go? 

Per pupil grant 

This will provide a flat grant 
of $225 or $250 per pupil « 
based on 1995 average daily 
attendance 



$411,973300 



Teachers Retirement 

Fund required under 
current law 

Alternative Schools 

Provides an alternative setting 
for disruptive students; 
gets them out of the normal 
classroom setting-creating 
safer schools 



$57,000,000 



$25,000,000 



Every School Disk wins 

Insures every school district. 
receives at least what they would 
receive under the Governor's 
proposed budget 



Retired Teachers Health 

Insurance 

Increase in cost over FY 96, 

from $22 million to 

$24.28 million 

TOTAL 




$3,569;222: 




$2,280,000 




$499,822,522 



Carmel audience invited to stroll along '42nd Street' 



When music Director Kent Parry chose 
the production for Carmel High School's 
spring musical he had no idea the plot would 
become so authentic. 

In "42nd Street," a chorus girl becomes a 
star when the leading lady breaks her ankle. 
At Carmel, one of the students had to be 
moved from the chorus when one of the girls 
was hurt during pom pon auditions, Parry 

said. 

More than 100 students will bring the 
musical to the Carmel stage April 19-21. Parry 
said he had never considered that particular 



show until junior Trisha Glazik, the student 
choreographer, suggested it He decided the 
talented students he had were up to it 

"I fell it's one of our strongest shows. It's a 
very high energy show, with high tempo," he 
said. "We have some very good talent. I feel 
people who come and see the show are going 
to feel very good." 

Familiar numbers that will get members 
of the audience tapping their feet include 
"We're In the Money," Shuffle off to Buffalo," 
"Quarter to Nine," and, of course, "Forty-sec- 
ond Street" 



The cast Includes senior Jeff Schlcsscr as 
Julian, sophomore Joe Tapper as Billy 
Lawlor, sophomore Silvana Rodriguez as 
Dorothy Brock, and freshman Amber Dusak 
as Peggy Sawyer, the chorus girl who 
becomes a star. 

Performances will be at 7:30 p.m. April 
19 and 20 and 2 p.m. April 21 in the Carmel 
auditorium, on Rte. 176 in Mundelein. 
Tickets are $5 for adults, and $4 for students 
and seniors. A special admission price on 
Sunday will admit senior citizens for $2. — 
bySUZlEREED 




n EDITORIAL LAkElANclNcwsp/vprwApiiil 19, 1996 



Political changes 




The biggest hope for any semblance of a Democratic show- 
ing in the Ixikc County November general election is change 
going on in the political face of the county, particularly within 
Republican ranks. 

The county still Is lopsldedly Republican. Democrats failed to 
field candidates in 17 primary races from County Board to the 
Illinois General Assembly. How successful they are will help 
determine whether there will be another GOP sweep like 1994 
when an avalanche of straight Republican ballots recaptured 
the county clerk's office, in Democratic hands for nearly two 
decades. The deadline for filling candidate vacancies through 
central committee action Is May 20. 
The latest Lake County primary saw Republicans outpolling 
'Democrats 63,841 to 17,393 in a sub-par turnout for both par- 
ties of a little better than 3 1 percent of registered voters, 
' County Democratic Chairman Terry Link gamely makes a case 
for his party's resurgancc on the basis of disarray in national 
GOP ranks that will make President Clinton a better choice than 
' Republican Son. Bob Dole. More Important to Link's cause, 
though, is how independent-minded Republicans react to their 
party's county ticket 

State Rep. Al Salvi's stunning victory suggests that mainstream 
Republicans are ready, willing and able to vote against party 
dictates when they think party leadership is misguided as In 
the case of stacking the deck in favor of Salvi's opponent The 
defeat of three County Board incumbents running with a party 
endorsement suggests further that Lake County Republicans 
will ignore party leaders who misread the electorate's growing 
aversion to rampant growth and devel opment The 1 996 
county Republican primary also saw more contests taking place 
for precinct committee posts which is an indication that the 
party is not a monolithic organization. 

The Democratic star in Lake County this fall unquestionably 
will be Mary Ellen Vanderventer, a professional in government 
with excellent credentials, who is running against veteran GOP 
whcclhorsc Bob Ncal for county recorder of deeds. Recorder 
isn't exactly a glamor position, but remember that Carole 
Moseley-Braun held the office before propelled to the U.S. 
Senate with momentum generated by Republican crossover 
voting in both the primary and general election. 

Combine the growing propensity for independence on the 
part of Lake County Republicans with a history of ticket-split- 
ting in moderate Shore Line precincts and an argument for a . 
serious Vanderventer challenge takes on substance. Democrats 
have another intriguing challenge, holding on to a County 
Board seat if they can produce an attractive opponent for 
County Board Rep. David Stolman (R-Buffalo Grove), a one- 
time Democrat, who became a Republican last year to insure 
his reelection. Turning on a turncoat is one of the most relish- 
ing motivations in American politics. 

Just like an overmatched golfer, Domocrats have reason to 
keep trying If they can score well In a couple of spots. 



Letters to tUe EcTitor 



Developers must pay 

Editor. 

No provisions were ever made 
or considered by the Vernon Hills 
village trustees for a land dona- 
tion for a school site. It should 
have been part of the ne- 
gotiations by the previous owner, 
the Zaie Group, and School Board 
Dist 120 trustees. Where were 
our representatives? Everybody 
was thinking about sewer and 
water hookup, open space and a 
golf course. 

As taxpayers, Vernon Hills res- 
idents and Libcrtyvillc residents 
should cry out and demand the 
land needed to build the new 
high school be provided by the 
developer. 

The Village of Libcrtyvillc 
trustees and Dist. 120 school 
board should meet and plan a 
referendum In the next nearest 
election for monies to build the 
new high school in Vernon Hills 
on the Cunco Property that has 
been designated for an 18 hole 
golf course. 

This could save taxpayers mil- 
lions of dollars. When this Idea Is 
accomplished, we can close the 
Brainerd Building as a school. 
There would be plenty of empty 
seats at the Butler Lake School 
with 40 percent of the student 
body leaving to attend the new 




TORIAL 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



-ViEwpoiNT 

Durbin flunks test 
on spending record 



BIILSCHROEDER 

Publisher 

Democratic Congressman Dick Durbin, who has 
his sights set on becoming Illinois' new U.S. sena- 
tor, flunked a test on Congressional spending con- 
ducted by the National Taxpayers Union. 

NTU rates U.S. Representatives and Senators on 
every vote that affects taxes, spending and the 
national debt. The study is regarded the fairest and 
most accurate guide available on congressinal 
spending. Latest figures arc for the 104th Congress, 
1st session of 1995. 

Durbin received an F on a rating of 25 percent 
Every roll call was analyzed. A grade of A indicates 
the member is a strong supporter of responsible tax 
and spending policies. B represents a good record 
on controlling spending and taxes. C grade means 
the official scored at least 50 percent D indicates 
the member has a poor voting record. An F places 
the member in the "Big Spender" category. 
To put NTU rankings into perspective, Republican 
Congressman Phil Crane, whose district includes 
west Lake County, received an A rating on fl8 per- 
cent, one of the highest in Congress. Republican 
Congressman John Porter, representing eastern 
Lake County, received a B rating on 83 percent 
Crane had one of two A's in the Illinois delegation. 
Porter had plenty of company in the B rating includ- 
ing the highly respected Henry Hyde of Park Ridge, 
Harris Fawell of the western suburbs, and Michael 
Flanagan, who unseated the Infamous Dan 
Rostcnkowski. The other A was won by Don 
Manzullo, whose north central district includes 
McHenry County. 

In his battle with Al Salvi, Durbin Is attempting to 
position himself as a ccntcrist and a moderate. 
How's he going to shake his record as a "Big 
Spender" when the record is compared? 

kkkklc 
MUSEUM BENEFIT — Gerry Traxlcr, one of Lake 
County's most durable musicians, will conduct his 
80-voice adult mixed show chorus Saturday and 
Sunday, May 111 and 19, in performances beginning 
at 8 p.m. at Libcrtyvillc High Auditorium to benefit 
the new Great Lakes Naval Museum. 




Traxlcr's latest production Is entitled "Latin Beats 
and Other Treats." The maestro, a resident of 
Vernon Hills, founded the choral group more than 
two decades ago, 

kkrkitk 

LATE SHOW — The explosion of flowers lining the 

highways and byways of Long Grove that trumpet 

the arrival of spring arc struggling to make their 

1 996 appearance. Crocus, normally here and gone 

by April 10, are just beginning to appear. Daffodils 

and jonquils, usually In full bloom by mid-April, arc 

expected to be three weeks late this year. 

***** 

***** 

COUNTING — Volunteers will be working this 
spring and summer to identify more than 300 bird 
species likely to be seen in and around the Liberty 
Prairie Reserve, a conservation area bounded by the 
DcsPlaincs River and Rte. 137 and 120. They've 
counted over 170 already. Bird watchers arc wel- 
come and can make arrangements for walks by con- 
tacting the Liberty Prairie Conservancy, 32400 N. 
Harris Rd., Grayslakc, 60030, or calling Susan Meyer 
at 847-548-5989. 

AAA kk 

LOTS OF SUDS — Despite another mlcrobrewery 
coming on line, the title for local beer production Is 
expected to be held for many years to come by the 
long defunct Zicman Brewery. 

Zleman grew out of World War II In aformcr 
creamery at Gilmer, just off Midlothian Rd., arvA 
developed a substantial following in Lake County 
taverns and bars on the north side of Chicago. To , 
my knowledge, the company only brewed draft 
beer. 

The newest micro is Flatiander's Restaurant & 
Brewery, about to open for the public in a new 
building at the corner of Milwaukee Ave. and Old 
Halfday Rd. (Rte.45), Lincolnshire. 

I have a recollection of Zicman Brewery that has 
always fascinated me. The sinks in the Brewery 
were equipped with three faucets — hot water, 
cold water, and the beer that made Gilmer 
famous. 



high school in Vernon Hills. 

Trustees for the Libcrtyvillc 
Cook Memorial Library should 
not be too hasty in determining 
their future goal and home site 
but rather get by for now at their 
present location on Cook Street. 
A good future location can be the 
old Brainerd High School build- 
ing. You won't have to close any 
streets or tear down any bank 
building or move out of town like 
the post office did. 

Jack Ccrvac 
Libcrtyvillc 

Symbolizes regime 

Editor 

State officials say that the pro- 
posed Rte. 53 Toliway is needed 
to complete a link in the regional 
highway network. We say they 
should look to the recent elec- 
tions for that link. 

The huge gains the County 
Board's open-space bloc posted 
in the recent Republican primary 
demonstrate that residents want 
a future with fewer tolls—not 
more of them. They want to ease 
the tolls that development took 
on their wallets and their way of 
life under the leadership of oust- 
ed Board Chairman Robert 
Dcpkc. 

Perhaps no other prolcct bet 
Sec LETTERS page B5 



individuals who need it the most 

Senate bill 1028, introduced by Senators 
Kennedy (D-Mass.) and Kassebaum (R-Kan.), 
would: 1. promote small group insurance purchas- 



Government plans will increase 
uninsured population in U.S. 

SCOTT A. SHALEK what good is it if we make health care portable and 

On April 19 the United States Senate is scheduled guaranteed, but no one can afford it? 
to consider legislation intended to provide insur- Our legislators In Washington need only look at 

ancc portability for Americans. In actuality, this leg- the states that have enacted laws requiring in - 
islation will not only increase the uninsured popula- surancc carriers to guarantee issue in the individual 
tion, but will increase the cost of insurance for the market. It has been a complete disaster. Insurance 

carriers have withdrawn from the marketplace, 
premiums have skyrocketed and the number ot 
uninsureds has soared in a very short time. In the 
state of Washington, more than 33 Insurance com- 
panies left the market and rates increased by 34 per- 
cent after such legislation. Recent estimates place 
the loss of individual coverage In New York at well 
over 64,000, following the implementation of indi- 

; vidual market reforms. (Kaiser Family Foundation, 

Ing cooperatives; 2. require insurance companies to 1995.) Similar problems have arisen in Kentucky, 
guarantee issue to certain individuals; and 3. require Maine, New Jersey and Vermont. 
employer-sponsored health plans to give credit to The National Assn. of Health Underwriters 
pre-existing conditions for persons moving from (NAHU) is an association of health and disability 
one employer group to another. Although the professionals servicing 119 million Americans. 
Kennedy/Kassebaum bill sounds good politically, it NAHU believes that all Americans should have 
has several very serious flaws which wUl result In access to affordable health Insurance and offers the 
higher insurance premiums, less choice for the con- Health Credit as an innovative way to achieve insur- 
sumcr, more uninsured Americans and fewer insur- ancc coverage through the competitive private scc- 
ance companies providing coverage. tor 

Neither Republicans or Democrats arc willing to The proposed Health Credit is a refundable tax 

address the real issue, which could lead to positive credit that would insure all Americans, regardless of 
health care reform and drastically reduce the num- income, have a basic level of resources to purchase 
ber of uninsured Americans. The real problem is not health insurance. . Jt creates a fair system which will 
portability and guaranteed issue, it is affordability. Sec COMMENTARY page B5 ' - 



Commentary 



1 



• 



. "'. '■'-. .: 




Ap.ll 19/199^ lAkEJANd' NeispApEw EDITORIAL 







Party Unes — — — — mwm — ~~~ 

Republican organization: This election is about freedom' 



MM 



Party Xi«es , the Lakeland Newspapers 
column of political commentary, is pre- 
pared from staff reports. 

Is everyone rested, everyone ready? 
asks the 8th Congressional District 
Republican organization in heralding Its 

annual dinner 
meeting, April 29 
at 6 p.m. 

The commit- 
tee's invitation 
declares that the 
'96 presidential 
race is about free- 
dom and 
"Republicans 
must stand up, 
get involved and 
work to oust Bill 
Clinton from the 
White House." 
The time has come for us to cast aside 
our devotion to other candidates we 
embraced In the primary election... we 
must now meet the challenge that lies 
ahead and remember, we can do the job." 
Tickets for the event, to be held at 
Concorde Banquet Hall on Rtc. 12 are 




Crane 



$20 each. 

Congress Phil Crane and a "special 
friend" arc headlining the event 

For more information contact Venlta 
McConnel, 526-7851. 

Unhapplness— All is not well these 
days on the Wildlife Advisory Committee 
of the Lake County Forest Preserve. Some 
members are irritated with the assertive 
style of Chairman Steve Packard and the 
fact that he's not a Lake County resident 

Packard, who holds a command posi- 
tion with the influential Illinois Nature 
Conservancy, was recommended for the 
county post by Tom Donnelly, who 
stepped down when committee activities 
began making headlines. 

Several committee members are wor- 
ried that Packard will transport the Nature 
Conservancy's tree destruction policies in 
Cook and DuPage Counties northward. 
Who says politics aren't involved in con- 
servation business? Forest Preserve Presi- 
dent Jim LaBelle admires Packard. 
• • • 

Response planned— The growing 
anti-Rte. 53 coalition is considering poten- 
tial responses to the April 25 address to the 



Transportation Management Assn. of Lake 
County by Linda Bolte, deputy director 
of planning at the Chicago Area Trans- 
portation Study (CATS). 

Bolte will speak at 9 a.m. at Raffaelli's, 
Libertyville, on "Destination 2020," the 
regional transportation plan for 
northeastern Illinois, The anti-53ers don't 
like the stance of highway experts that the 
controversial tollway will be a done deal 
by then. 



Starting 
early — Reports 
are circulating in 
Antioch Township 
that old-line 

Republicans are 
seeking a candi- 
date to unseat 
County Board 
Rep. Judy Mar- Martini 
tin! (R-Antioch). Mentioned as a likely foe 
is restaurateur Taso Maravellas. Sounds 
like a long campaign. Martini doesn't 

come up for re-election until 1998. 

• • • 




Successor — Stan Mill, a registered 
professional engineer, is emerging as a 
potential successor to Dr. William Dam 
as chairman of the Fox Waterway Agency. 
Mill, a resident of Johnsburg, is a director- 
representing McHenry County. The rest- 
less physician is ready to move on. 



• • • 



Neal top humanitarian— Bob Neal, 
GOP candidate for Lake County Recorder of 
Deeds, has been named a Mclvin. Jones j 
Fellow by Lions Club International- 
Foundation. Jt the highest form of recogni- 
tion given by the foundation. 

Neal received the award for his untir- 
ing effort in conducting a variety of com- 
munity and humanitarian projects during' 
the years he was with the Wadswprtiv 
lions Club. Among the programs he has 
participated in and or chaired are food, 
baskets for the needy and for families of. 
cancer patients at Midwestern Regional 
Medical Center, the barn painting at 
Mlllburn Museum, Candy Days, 
Operation Baby Buckle and Sight First. 

Neal has been active in the Lions for 
nearly two decades. 



Letters 



$ 



From page B4 

ter symbolizes this defeated regime than 
the proposed Rte. 53 Tollway. Certainly no 
other project would unleash development 
over such a sprawling territory, crowding 
our schools, our local roads and our envi- 
ronment Citizens want development, 
such as Prairie Crossing, that conserves 
the very amenities that moke Lake County 
such an attractive place to live. Everyone 
agrees that traffic needs to be relieved and 
growth accommodated. And, judging by 
the landslide support for challengers to 
the County Board's pro-growth leaders, 
nearly everyone agrees that they should 
have other choices besides this proposed 
tollway. 

Since 1993, when the General Assembly 
revived the Rte. 53 Extension as a tollway, 
open-space candidates have unseated the 
chairman of the Forest Preserve Dist., the 
chairman of Planning, Building and 
Zoning and, of course, the chairman of the 
board. In each case, these triumphs camp 
in districts affected by the proposed toll- 
way, and they came against officials close- 
ly aligned with the board's pro-tollway 
majority. That's not a coincidence. That's 
a connection. 

We urge the rest of Mr. Dcpke's 
Republican machine to listen to the ballot- 
ing, rather than their political- boss — to 
heed the elections rather than the engi- 
neers. This is about their future as much as 
their constituents'. 

Cheryl Doros 
Grayslake Action Alliance 

Rte. 53 parallel not first 

Editor 

Recently in your paper, former Illinois 
State Rep. John Matijevich challenged the 



Commentary 

From page B4 

enable everyone to obtain insurance 
protection, achieving universal coverage 
through Incentive, not mandates. 

NAHU's proposed Health Credit 
retains the employer-based system of 
health Insurance, but for the first time 
equalizes the tax breaks for those who 
must, of necessity, obtain insurance out- 
side the employer-based system. This 
includes the unemployed and people 
between jobs, early retirees, the self- 
employed, partnerships and a largo por- 
tion of the uninsured population' who 
have no incentive to obtain coverage. The 
same health credit would be available* to 



tollway to show any two separate tollways 
that run parallel to each other and are only 
a few miles apart. 

One example that comes to mind is in 
New Jersey. The Garden State Parkway 
and the New Jersey Turnpike parallel one 
another for about 15 miles between Union 
to Clifton and Elizabeth to lUdgcftcld Park, 
respectively. The distance between the 
two tollways varies between approx- 
imately five to eight miles. Colncldentaliy, 
the distance between the proposed north 
extension of Rtc. 53 and the Tri-Statc 
Tollway also varies between ap- 
proximately five to eight miles. 

The environmental impact statement 
for the Rte. 53 extension Is currently being 
drafted by the Illinois Dept of Transporta- 
tion. The environmental impact statement 
will address many of Mr. Matijevich 's con- 
cerns about the transportation needs of 
Lake County. 

David Loveday 

Press Secretary 

Illinois State Toll Highway 

Authority 

Knocked on 3,500 doors 

Editor. 

Now that things have settled down and 
my life is getting back to normal after the 
long road to the primary, I'd like to thank 
everyone for the support and vote of con- 
fidence. 

I'm proud to represent the Republican 
party in Dist. 7 (Warren Township) this 
November and honored by the over- 
whelming trust you have placed in me. 

I worked hard covering 15 of the distric- 
t's 20 precincts by foot; knocking on an 
estimated 3,500 doors. It was a pleasure 
meeting the voters of Dist 7, and in several 
instances reacquainting myself with 



people on welfare, thus encouraging a 
movement into the work force and remov- 
ing the present incentive to stay on welfare 
to avoid losing Medicaid. 

I urge every voter who is concerned 
about health insurance coverage to call or 
write their senators and representatives 
and urge them to reconsider the pending 
legislation which will increase costs and 
the number of insureds. Instead we must 
work for a solution that makes health care 
accessible and affordable to all Americans. 

Editor's note: Scott A Shalek is president 
of Chicago and Northeastern Illinois Assn. 
of Health Underwriters. He heads his own 
underwriting firm in Fox Lake, 



friends from high school and former 
neighbors and co-workers. I'm also grate- 
ful for the many individuals who took time 
out of their busy lives to help with my 
campaign; stuffing envelopes, making 
phone calls and so much more. 

With the general election ahead of me, 
I'm ready to continue to work hard and 
once elected on Nov. 11 will represent your 
Interests on the County Board, Thank you. 

AlWcstcrman 
Dist 7 Republican candidate 

Easter Bunny politicized 

Editor 

Did anyone take their children to the 
Easter parade in Antioch? The kids were all 
excited to come to see a parade, get some 
candy and see the Easter Bunny (the high- 
light of the event). 

Imagine my surprise and disgust when 
the Easter Runny came down the road and 
was sporting a political sticker for Bob 
Neal on his chest. Neal Was the only politi- 
cian I noticed campaigning in the parade, 
which is OK with me, but this is a parade 
for the children — to celebrate Easter— to 
see the bunny. I would like to know who 
thought this was acceptable to do. Did 
they think it was funny? 

What's next, bumper stickers on 
Santa's sleigh? 

Karen Sowul 
Antioch 

Editor's note; Bob Neal is the Republican 
candidate for Lake County Recorder of 
Deeds. 



Late starter misguided 

Editor 

Maybe I'm missing something. If so, I 
hope someone will enlighten me. 

Mark Ratfelders claims he's running for 
the County Board to give voters a choice. 
Excuse me, but isn't that what they just had? 
And they chose AlWcstcrman. 
If Ratfelders Is as disturbed as he claims \ 
^by-the Idea of campaign help from rmtciHo 
the district, why dldn'thc chaUcn^rf J 
himself? Depke is, after all, the P 
fund raiser who has taken in tens ofu\ ter 
sands of dollars each year from son^" 
well outside his district ""*» 

Big-money political action committees 
from Oakbrook and SpringfieldTelp^ 
ensure his past victories. Every developer 
road builder, gravel supplier, etc., doine 
busing with the county' has' bc^n 
encouraged" to attend his fund raisers 
Anyone who saw Depke's and iSS 

Westerman's courage^ DWn ' hc h *ve 
Or is It that Ratfelders: =„,i r* , 

just two peas in a pod? *** Depke ™ 
Having finally dumped Deoke wK, 

earth would Dist 7 (Warre/^l^ 

voters want to go back to the sanTc Tofd 

Martha A. Marks 

Riverwoods 

Lake County Board 



gr^^^f*— *^«^*h 



• , | , • I -. . 




.:}.' '.- <u 



., 




HEALTH WATCH UkclAwd NcwspApcRs Apnil 1 9,1 996 






Covlr.ll 
McdicAl Ggni'gh 



Mammograms 

Condcll Acute Care Center, 
2 E Rollins M, Round Lake 
Beach is now doing mammo- 
grams on Tuesday evenings by 
appointment only. The facility, 
affiliated with Condcll Medical 
Center of Libcrtyville, Is 
accredited by the American 
College of Radiology. 
Appointments will be offered 
from 4 to 10 p.m. Results will be 
read by radiologists at Condcll 
Medical Center and will then 
be sent to your physician of 
choice. The make an appoint- 
ment in Round Lake Beach, 
call 740-2500. 

Physician Referral 

A Physician Referral 
Service is offered tlirough the 
Doctor's Office Connection 
(DOC) at CondeU Medical 
Center. Call DOC-2905, cxt 
5610. 



Good SlicpfiCRcJ 
HospiiAl . 



Art therapy 

On-going Art Therapy 
Group sponsored by Good 
Shepherd Mental Health 
Services. Must be referred by a 
Good Shepherd physician. 
Adults meet on Thursdays 
from 7 to 9 p.m. and adoles- 
cents (ages 12 to 18) meet on 
Tuesdays from? to 9 p.m. Cost 
is $15. Contact Mary Farrell at 
381-0123, cxt 5405. 

Rational Recovery 

This alcohol/chemical de- 
pendency recovery program is 
an alternative to Alcoholics 
Anonymous. Meets at 6:30 
p.ml Thursdays at6:30p.m.in 
the Private Dining Room at 
Good Shepherd Hospital. For 
more information call 381- 
0123, ext 5400. 



. L\I<e CouNiy 
Hea'Ith Department 



Immunization clinics 

The Lake County Health 
Dcpt. offers immunization 
clinics for Lake County chil- 
dren. Childhood immuniza- 
tion clinics will be held at the 
following locations. A parent 
or guardian must accompa- 
ny all children: 

Lake County Health 
Dept, Bclvidere Medical 
Bldg., 2400 Belvidcre Rd., 
Waukcgan, every Monday 
from 1 to 3 p.m.; Tuesday, 
to 10 a.m.; and Thursday 
from 1 to 3 p.m. No appoint- 
ment is necessary. 

Health care programs 

The Lake County Health . 
Dept. Nursing Division offers 
several programs at no 
charge to eligible pregnant 
women, mothers and chil- 
dren who live in Lake 
County. Child Health 
Conferences, or Well-Baby 
Clinics, are held each month 
in Zion, North Chicago, 
Round Lake and Waukegari. '.. 
Parents who wish to bring 
their children must call 360- K 
6731 for an appointment 

The Special 

Supplemental Food Program 

vfor Woman, Infants and 
•Children (W1C) ^proyides^ 
supplemental : fob ds * ': and 
nutrition education to moth? \ ., 
ers and-tliekchlla^etf under ■ 
age 5. For an appointment, 

'; call 360-6781. 



Get moving — take a walk for a healthy heart 



The American Heart Association wants 
to help people to become more physically 
active, and they believe they have found a 
way to do it. "The Healthy Heart Walking 
Tape," narrated by Rita Moreno, is a 
unique walking program that will help to 
increase stamina and fitness, and improve 
overall cardiovascular health. 

"Walking is one of the best forms of 
exercise and it is something almost every- 
one can do," said William W. Ashley, MD; 
president of the American Heart 
Association of Metropolitan Chicago, 
"Walking not only helps maintain a healthy 
heart, but it also helps to control weight 
and reduce stress. 1 * 

"The Healthy Heart Walking Tape" fea- 
tures a 30-minutc beginners walk and a 30 



minute Intermediate walk for those ready 
for a faster pace. The tape features original 
music composed to Keep walkers moving 
at a pace that will provide the level of acr- 

'Walking is one of the best 
forms of exercise and it is 
something almost everyone 
can do/ 

—William W. Ashley, MD 

oblc workout recommended by the AHA. 
"The Healthy Heart Walking Tape" pub- 
lished by Simon and Schuster Audio is 
available in bookstores nationwide, 

"An exercise program should be reward- 



ing so, stay with it," said Ashley. "A regular 
walking program using this tape will help 
achieve one's fitness goals." 

In addition to the walking tape, the 
American Heart Association also has 
released "The Healthy Heart Walking Book" 
published by Macmillan USA. Unlike any 
other walking book on the market, it fea- 
tures a 12-wcek walking diary to customize 
a program to fit ones needs. Starting with a 
one-mile walking test to assess a fitness 
level, this book helps build a walking pro- 
gram by providing tips on how to get stag- 
ed, the best places to walk, how to find good 
walking shoes, what to eat for optimum 
health and fitness, how to overcome age- 
old excuses and stay motivated and how to 
put more fun Into walking. 



HEALTHWATCH 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Workout to raise funds for City of Hope 



Chicago is hosting Workout 
for Hope — America's largest and 
most dynamic health and fitness 
event— from 9 a.m. to noon, 
Saturday, April 20, at the 
Roscmont Convention Center. 
Registration will begin at 7:30 
a.m. Leading the Chicago 
Workout will be Co-Chairs 
Beverly Beck and Marycllen 
Bowman, For event information 
and registration forms call (800) 
779-5893. 

The event has something for 
everyone with a host of fitness 
activities including a variety of 
aerobics, and for the first time at 
the Chicago Workout, step aero- 
bics. Teams of presenters in cos- 
tumes will lead the workout, each 
team with a different theme. 
There arc no endurance tests or 
records to beat because every- 
body exercises at their own pace. 

Workout for Hope began eight 
years ago in San Francisco as a 
fund-raiser to support HIV/AIDS 
and related cancer research at the 
City of Hope National Medical 
Center and Beckman Research 



Institute. The event has grown to 
include more than 70 cities 
nationwide. Participants collect 
donations In the weeks prior to 
the event and then work out from 
one to three hours on event day 



memorabilia and tickets to sport- 
ing events going to the highest 
bidder. The top fund-raiser in 
Chicago will also win a treadmill, 
donated by Kozy's Cyclery. 
"Workout for Hope, a united 



with the top fitness teams in their force against HIV/AIDS and relat- 



arca. A minimum of $50 is 
required to participate and 
Master Card and Visa will be 
accepted for contributions made 
at the event 

A special feature of this year's 
Chicago Workout is the dedica- 
tion of participants' workouts to 
loved ones who have battled 
HIV/AIDS. Tribute stickers and a 
dedication book will be available 
at the event 

This year's Workout also will 
offer a variety of additional fea- 
tures. Participants are asked to 
bring canned goods and juice, 
which will be donated to Alexian 
Brothers Bonavcnture House. 
The Quilt, remembering those 



ed cancers, offers exercise enthu- 
siasts a way to stay fit, have fun 
and help others," said Cecilia 
Cooper, director, City of Hope's 
Workout for Hope campaign. 

In 1995, more than $1.4 mil- 
lion was raised by nearly 20,000 
physical fitness enthusiasts 
across the country. Throughout 
its brief history, Workout for 
Hope has raised more than $8.5 
million for the advancement of 
HIV/AIDS and related cancer 



research and treatment at City of 
Hope. The results of this research 
ultimately affect people every- 
where as City of Hope shares 
knowledge and new treatments 
with the medical community 
worldwide. 

"City of Hope, long recognized 
for its leading-edge cancer 
research, is at the forefront of 
research to combat the compli- 
cated AIDS vims," said Beck. "I 
am honored to be part of this 
worthwhile event because It 
offers an opportunity to make a 
difference in the lives of mil- 
lions." 

To find out more about City of 
Hope, contact the Chicago office 
at (800) 779-5893. 



Brightening a patient's day 



Most hospital patients will 
agree that nothing cheers them 
more than a thoughtful visit from 



with HIV/AIDS, will be on display family, friends or neighbors. On 
courtesy of The Names Project. 
There will also be a silent auction, 
offering autographed sports 



perfo: 



occasion, however, those visits 
can turn into less than desirable 
experiences. The staff of Victory 
Memorial Hospital has a few com- 
mon sense guidelines that can 
help avoid the disappointment of 
a supportive visit gone awry. 

It is important to remember, 
for instance, that hospitals care 
for people in various degrees of 
discomfort and ill health. At 



Students become pertormers 
through 'Prevention Theatre' 

More than 30 students from five Lake County high schools gath- 
ered in Grayslake recenUy to learn about the power of drama as a 
substance abuse prevention medium. Students spent the day learn- Victory the staff strives to create a 
ing about Prevention Theatre, as well as other skills such as group quiet, calming environment for 
processing, facilitation, listening and communication. all patients. When visiting, it is 

"The goal is to have students go out and present information on important not to shout greetings 
subjects important to teens by performing skits for their fellow stu- or call to other guests down the 
dents," explained Jennifer Johnson, one of the facilitators of the nal1 - When children visit, they 
training, and a member of the Prevention Scrviccs/lnTouch Program. 

Students learned a variety of skits on such topics as alcohol, 

tobacco, drugs, suicide, teen pregnancy, peer and parent relations, 

dating, sex and AIDS. The goal is to have a number of Lake County 

high schools involved In the Prevention Theatre program. When an %*£* £ ™^,™"VZ2 3 

" v , j _. _r *u patients they visit, sometimes at 

area school needs a presentation or performer, they can contac one ^ ucnt / * st Rerncmber 

of their fellow schools. By exchanging performers, schools can keep 
the cost of prevention presentations down, while getting high quality 
information. 

Students from Antioch, Johnsburg, Libcrtyville, Grant and Warren 
Township High Schools were at the workshop, as well as representa- 
tives from the Bringing All Teens Together Program and Omni Youth 
Services. "There was a lot of energy and excitement from the kids," 
said Johnson. "But, even more Importantly, a lot of good ideas. I am 
looking forward to sharing those with other schools across Lake 
, County." 

Schools and organizations interested in Prevention Theatre 
should call Johnson .ol.thq ^Prevention Services/In Touch office at. 
223-6601, cxt 2856. Prevention Services/In Touch is a joint program 
of the Lake County Health Dcpt the Northern Illinois Council on 
Alcoholism and Substance Abuse (NICASA), and the College of Lake 
County. 



hall. When children 
should be reminded not to run 
through corridors and up stair- 
wells. 

Families and friends arc often 
tempted to bring food or candy to 



that diets arc at times restricted 



due to medications, tests and ill- 
ness. Before bringing any food, 
candy or beverage item to a 
patient, talk to the nurse on duty. 
Simply call the hospital before 
leaving home and ask to speak to 
the patient's nurse. The nurse 
will be happy to answer any ques- 
tions you may have. 

Cellular phones are becom- 
ing more and more popular. 
However, they arc not allowed 
Inside hospitals cither for making 
or receiving calls because the cir- 
cuitry interferes with the running 
of vital hospital equipment. 

For a free flyer, A Guide to 
Visiting Patients, listing fifteen 
tips of hospital etiquette, call 
Victory's Community Relations 
Dept at l-(000) THE CHOICE, 
Monday through Friday, between 
8 am. to 5 p.m. Members of the 
Victory Speakers Bureau arc 
available to speak to groups an 
organizations about visiting 
friends and family in hospitals. 
For more Information or to 
schedule a speaker, call 360-4148. 



Amblyopia Support Group scheduled 

Asupport group for parents of children with amblyopia, or "lazy 
eye," will meet at 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 24, on 10 W. Room 1041, ; 
Lutheran General Hospital, 1775 Dempster, Park Ridge. 

Amblyopia Is the most common cause of serious eye vision loss 

' in infants and children. Treatment involves pat ching or otherwise 
blurring vision in the good eye to force die child to use the ambly- 
opic one. The meeting will provide an opportunity for parents and 

^medical professionals to exchange ideas In an informal setting. 

^i-TTriem^ 
information and to make a reservation, contact D arieen Salomon at 
Pediatric Ophthalmology and Adult Strabismus Center, Ltd., 292- 
2020. 



I 



:■ '■ ■ ■ 



; ' ,-''■ 






. 



'1 



Apiiit'i 9,1996 'UclAwd Newspapers HEALTHWATCH 





* 



\ 




<Zfi>fi n 




To Our Volunteers 




Victory Memorial Hospital Volunteers 



Victory Lakes Volunteers 



John Atbrccht 
Jccna Alex 
Ardis Altman 
Evelyn Andersen 
Margaret Babicz 
Dave Bartlctt 
Carol Bcaslcy 
Kelly Bennett 
Kathcrinc Bcrggrcn 
Doris Bcrsic 
Bcmicc Bittncr 
Shirley Bjork 
Ramon a Bo wen 
Phoebe Boyd 
Jack Brinckcrhoff 
Jeanne Brooks 
Beatrice Brown 
Kathy Brubaker 
Otto Brunke 
Kctta Bubnich 
Walter BufTum 
Mary Bullock 
Jody Bulson 
Bill Burfield 
Chris Bums 
Alvin Calhoun 
William Campbell 

Kathcrine Carlson 

Julia Castillo 

Edith Cavanaugh 

John Clark 

Judy Clync 

Vclma Cornish 

Rose Coulson 

Theresa Craig 

Robert Crawford 

Catrina Crociani 

Hazel Daniclson 

Esther Dcglcr 
. Colleen Dennis 

Michelle des Rosters 

Sandy Dicdrich 

Bronwcn Dodd 

Viola Dolan 

Dorothic Dorband 

Jerry Dorn 

Darryl Doty 

Patti Dowling 

Wade Downey 

Dolores Dragman 

Helen Drobnick 

Lillian Eggcrs 

Gene Evans 

Lois Felskc 



Jean Fen ton 
Ethel Fernandez 
Adeline Filippo 
Bcv Finch 
Lili F I ores 
Jcri Foote 
Lorraine Forsythc 
Marion Foster 
Vera Frazicr 
June Fullcrton 
Rita Gagnon 
Celia Gebcrbaucr 
Edwin Gebcrbaucr 
Joe George 
Lydia Giacchctti 
Lori Gilberts 
Ronald Gilberts 
Linda Gillman 
Ethel Golwitzer 
Angelica Gonzalez 
Betty Griffith 
Bruce Griffith 
Kathleen 

Grutzmachcr 
Dorothy Gundcrson 
Dorothy Gustafson 
Penny Gutierrez 
Rozic Hamilton 

Darlcnc Hammond 

Henri Hnnau 

Ruth Hankcy 

Arda Haroian 

Iris Harris 

Mnrgarct Harris 

Nancy Harris 

Patricia Hayes 

Dick Haynesworth 

Edith Hens 

Ruth Hcringlakc 

Alycc Hesse 

Bcmicc Hewitt 

Harvey Hewitt 

Gladys Hicks 

Lora Hiney 

Bcttc Hocm 

Rcva Holt 

Molly Homan 

Patricia Hoover 

Mary Helen Hudson 

Bertha Hulscbus 

Barb Hummel 

Jim Ingram 

Dolores Irish 

Tamisc Irons 



William Isaacson 
Winifred Isaacson 
Elaine Jakimiak 
Betty Jan icrson 
Gene Jcrcb 
Diane Jcscnovcc 
Frank Jocius 
Jay John 
Janice Johnson 
Teresa Johnson 
Hcathcrlynn 

Jonescuc 
Nick Kanka 
Ardyce Kaspcr 
Mary Kaspcr 
Jennie Kastcn 
Virginia Kaymen 
Margaret Kccnan- 

Denniston 
Alta Kennedy 
Marjoric Kidder 
Mike Kim 
Jan Knobbc 
Joe Knobbe 
Loyd Kocnig . 
Ruth Kocnig 
Sylvia Koski 
Arlccn Kough 
Vivian Krohn 
Herb Krucgcr 
Shirley Krucgcr 
Rulh Kniger 
Anne Kundcrt 
Kristcl Kurz, 
John Laffcrty 
Altha Latz 
Sharon Lawrence 
Al Lcicht 
Moxinc Lcnz 
Kirsti Lerche 
Betty Lewis 
Betty Li nd berg 
Hcrtha Lindbcrg 
May Loquidis 
Betty Lund 
John Lush 
Mary on Lush 
June Mackcy 
Jeanne Mncuiba 
Phyllis Malm 
Terrell Ma lone 
Anne Marin 
Marion Marquis 
Hugh Maynard 



Grace McAllister 
Miriam McCartney 
Joe McKcown 
Katie McKcown 
Pauline McSparin 
Viola McSparin 
Jackie Mcdciros 
Michelle Mcrlock 
Betty Miller 
Duane Miller 
Fern Milter 
Ruth Miller 
Lubica Miloshevich 
Marie Mirr 
Betty Morgan 
Diane Myers 
Helen Neil 
Florence Nero 
Joe Nero 
Gloria Nielsen 
Robert Nimits 
Aldenc Nordmark 
Dorothy Ogilvic 
Dorothy Oglcsby 
Kimbcrly Oglcsby 
Mary Oglcsby 
Virginia 01 sen 
Ray Orlowski 
Dorothy Ovcrby 
Robert Park 
Jenny Pcacy 
Willie Peloza 
Cora Pcntovalle 
Mike Peters 
Gladys Piat 
Mary Plancy 
Joe Podraza 
Ruth Podraza 
Bicnvcntda Ponce 
Jenny Porrcca 
Miriam Portegys 
Bessie Powell 
Louise Radke 
Cumclla Rand 
Marge Rcndak 
Richard Reynolds 
Doris Richtcr 
Mary Riley 
Doris Ringstrom 
Nicole Rose 
Courtney Rucks 
Herb Rudolph 
Jennifer Rucsch 
Theresa Rungc 



Dolores Russell 
Bca Samilow 
Mari Sanchez 
Lucille Sarich 
Gladys Savage 
Grace Schaibly 
Ann Schcnck 
Moniquc Sharif! 
Martha Ann Siepkcr 
Dorothy Skalla 
Virginia Smalc 
Melissa Smith 
Yctta Smith 
Marion Sneyd 
Sandra Sorenscn 
Doris Spiccr 
Winifred Stanczak 
George Swanson 
Jeanctte Swanson 
Mildred Theehs 
Tracy Thompson 
Ethel Toomcy 
Ted Trombino 
Lena Turner 
Gilbert Van 
Nell Van 
Valma Ventura 
Esther Vidcr 

Mary Vincski 

Doris Vogelsang 

Carol Voorhcis 

Pat Waller 

Adeline Wnliher 

Tiffany Warren 

Chcrissa Washington 
Carol Wasson 
Don Wasson 
Lisa Watts 

Olga Wigoda 

Eleanor Wilcox 

Kim Willard 

Doris Willcttc 

Dick Wilts' ■ 

Carol Wocrtz 

Elizabeth Wojtowicz 

Maizic Wood 

Shelley Worth 

Evelyn Worthcn 

Irene Wrona 

Mary Young 

Fred Zochler 



Neco Blackard 
Lois Bay 

Kathleen Bcckman 
Annette Boston 
Alice Brandt 
Rebecca Ayrc 
Leigh Brda 
Christie Brczinski 
Erica Bonovitz 
Pat Buchcnburgcr 
Janet Buchholz 
Mary Chesla 
Nancy Clutter 
Carolyn Chinn 
Rosemary Colucio 
Nikki Crutchficld 
Linza Czuba 
Jill Denoma 
Carol Denman 
Margaret Dc Young 
Janet Dillard 
Paul Gil to 
Barbara Donaldson 
The Duffy Family 
Chris Hagen 
Betty Hcntschcll 
Ron Fricsen 
Rachcllc Fricsen 
Grant Gccr 
Brandon Gccr 
Annie Gcrlock 
Bill Gcrlock 

Alice Gicstr 

Barbara Grascr 

David Griffin 

Dorothy Hallbcrg 

Casey Hubka 

Steve Harrison 

Edward "Duke" Harper 



Allison Hcvrdcjs 

Rosmaric Hcvrdcjs 

Nicole Harris 

Clem Jablonski 

Louise Jankowiak 

Grace Jaskowiak 

Lynn Johnson 

Jackie Kalb 

Cassie Jeffries 

Josic Kick 

James Klcczar 

Meg Koeck 

Barbara Konitzer 

Lavemc Kraemer 

Rich Kraemer 

Brandy Kuenhotd 

Frieda Lichter 

Lana Krucgcr 

Shirley Litwick 

Betty Lomonaco 

Kristin Locke 

Maureen Long 

Dorothy Longly 

Elcanorc Mannila 

Jcnna Martin 

Chris Matcja 

Scotty McDowell 

Eileen McGuire 

Linda McMahon 

Jennie Meyer 

Rhonda Meyer 
The Mi lender Family 
Stephanie MondcUo 
Franccsca Monleicone 
Gloria MorclU-Paul 
Tanya Nelson 
Mike Nobler 
Ann Marie O'Brien 
Jane Pcdersen 



Norb Pischkc 
Betty Pischkc 
Victoria Plcviak 
Lori Ann Popclka 
Dorothy Prais 
Joyce Proper 
Allison Quane 
Lucille Sarich 
Alice Scheske 
Carl Scheske 
Char Schmerbauch 
Sarah Schwartz 
Kim Shefncr 
Pauline Sinkus 
Adeline Smolka 
Carol Stafford 
Christine Strom 
Arline Swanson 
Vanessa Taulbee 
Ariel Terdin 
Pat Thamerus 
Patti Thornborough 
Julie Twomcy 
Faye Veltmum 
Helen Stringer 
Dorothy Wcntworth 
Marijane White 
Ginnic Wicbcr 
Shelley Wolfgram 
Dorothea Wolf 



Vol*un*teer (voPan-tir') n. 1. An extraordinary person who 
performs needed services at his or her own will. 2. A 
valued team member who makes an immeasurable 
difference. 3. Someone who reaches out to his or her 
community and renders aid under his or her own initiative. 
4. A special individual who brightens the days of others, 
lends a helping hand and who's work is very appreciated. 



(847) 360-4127 




Victory 

Memorial 

Hospital 



Give something to your community 
and yourself. . .Volunteer Today. 



(847) 356-5900 




1 324 N. Sheridan Road 
Waukegan, IL 60085 ' , .... 



Victory Lakes 
Continuing 

Care Center 
J 



1055 E. Grand Avenue 
Lindenhurst, IL 60046 




; w : :* 




r : .- \. 



". t!..>- 



. ■•-■? It) I I 



iPdiihufi 



j . I rjjliitli v: 




HEALTHWATCH UI<eIan<I Newspapers Ap»U 19,1996 



Advice to deskbound Exercise tips for allergy sufferers 

professionals: get moving 



Most of the 00 million 
Americans who work long hours 
In front of a computer know just 
what a pain in the neck it can be. 
What many of them may not 
know, back experts say, is that 
their sedentary jobs arc making 
them sitting ducks for serious 
and sometimes irreversible spine 
injury. 

"Being glued to an office chair 
for extended periods can put 
enormous pressure on delicate 
spinal structures," says Dr. 
Leonard J. Ccrullo, medical direc- 
tor of the Chicago Institute of 
Neurosurgery and Neurorcsearch 
(CINN), one of die world's fore- 
most facilities for the treatment 
of brain and spine disorders. 

"Such sustained stress can 
gradually narrow the passage- 
ways for the spinal cord and 
nerves, often leading to debilitat- 
ing neck and back pain, herniat- 
ed discs — even paralysis." 

Pew professionals and office 
workers realize they arc at risk, 
however. 

In fact, most people still asso- 
ciate back injury with lifting a 
desk, not sitting at one, even 
though one of the most common 
causes of serious back and neck 
problems is simply doing too 
much of nothing at all. 

CINN urges anyone making a 
living parked behind a PC to 
pay attention to the early warn- 
ing signs of injury so minor 
pains do not become major 
problems. 

Warning signs to watch for 
include regular twinges of dis- 
comfort in the back and legs, stiff 
neck and shoulders, tingling or 
numbness in the arms and 
hands, and weak grip. "Do not 
wait until the symptoms become 



severe", cautions Dr. Ccrullo. 
"Often by that time, the Injury 
has occurred and the damage has 
been done." 

Along with incorporating reg- 
ular exercise into the work day, 
computer users should get their 
work areas into shape as well. 

"Taking care of such basics 
as chair and desk height and 
proper monitor positioning can 
keep from twisting, over-reach- 
ing or slouching the way to seri- 
ous back injury," says CINN 
Physical Therapist Elkc 
Friedman, whose team of phys- 
ical and occupational thera- 
pists have designed economi- 
cally correct and employee- 
friendly workspaces for dozens 
of Chicago-area firms. 

Shoulder and chest 
stretch: Reaching behind the 
back, clasp fingers together with 
palms facing in. Slowly raise and 
straighten arms. Hold this posi- 
tion for several seconds, then 
slowly release. Repeat three 
times. 

Torso stretch: Raise elbows 
while keeping hips stationary. 
Twist upper body at the waist to 
the right. Hold this position for 
several seconds, then repeat on 
left side. Repeat on each side 
three times. 

Chest stretch: Place fingers 
behind head and squeeze shoul- 
der blades together until tension 
is felt through the upper back, 
then slowly release. Repeat three 
times. 

Shoulder stretch: Stretch 
right arm across the upper body. 
With left arm, pull right elbow 
toward the left shoulder. Hold 
this position for several seconds, 
then reverse arms. Repeat three 
times. 



Physician accepts teaching appointment 



Gurncc physician Ellen R. 
Schwartz, MD has been 
appointed instructor of clinical 
medicine at Northwestern 
University Medical School 
Faculty. Schwartz is a member 
of Highland Park Hospital's 
medical staff and practices with 
Lakeland Primary Care 
Associates at the group's 
Gurncc office. 

Schwartz received her 
undergraduate degree from 
Harvard University, where she 
was a member of Phi Beta 
Kappa and attended medical 
school at Columbia University 



and Chicago Medical School 
She completed her residency 
training in Internal Medicine 
at Evanston Hospital of 
Northwestern University. Her 
areas of special skill and inter- 
est include the management of 
chronic conditions such as 
diabetes and hypertension, 
health maintenance, and the 
special issues affecting women 
and mature adults. 

Her office is located at 501 N. 
Riverside Dr. In Gurncc. For more 
information, call the Lakeland 
Primary Care Associates Gumec 
office at 662-9709. 



Laser eye surgery seminar offered 



A free class on the newest 
advances in refractive eye 
surgery will be offered at Good 
Shepherd Hospital on 
Wednesday, April 24 from 7 to 
p.m. In the hospital's Lakcview 
Room. Opthamologist Mark 
Buranosky, MD will present a 
class on lixcimcr Laser and 



Refractive Surgery for any 
interested In the latest 
advances in corrective eye 
surgery. 

There is no charge for the 
class, but space is limited and 
reservations may be made by 
calling Health Advisor at 1- 
(800) 323-0622. 



ATTENTION DEFICIT DISORDER 

Potentially no more Ritalin. Natural 
relief is now available. Call Maximum 
Enterprises: I -4 1 9-868-6567 for free 
24-hour recorded message. 



Sniffling and sneezing do not 
have to be paSt of -a regular exer- 
cise routine, but for the 60 million 
Americans who suffer from sinus 
and allergy problems, they are. A 
brisk walk or an enjoyable game 
of golf or tennis Is often cut short 
by the onset of allergy symptoms. 
Many times, joggers must stop 
running simply because their 
noses started. 

Allergies should not force 
allergy sufferers to give up their 
outdoor exercise plan. The 
American Lung Association, 
dedicated to helping Americans 
lead healthier, more active 
lives, and the makers of Tavist 
arc helping millions of allergy 
sufferers learn how to manage 
their allergies and enjoy out- 
door exercise. Following is a list 
of measures allergy sufferers 
can take to make outdoor exer- 
cise sncczelcss. 
If you exercise outdoors 

You should: Breathe through 
the nose — it is a natural air filter. 



Stretch indoors to minimize time 
spent outside, and take an anti- 
histamine 30 minutes before 
going out 

If you like to get a head start 
on the day 

You should: Avoid exercising 
too early, as most pollens arc 
emitted by plants between 5 to 10 
a.m. 
If you play the field 

You should: Avoid exercising 
in fields or meadows where irri- 
tating grasses, weeds and trees 
can be abundant. 
If you plan to be outside 

You should: Plan activities 
around allergies. Exercising after 
a rain can be better for those with 
pollen allergies, but worse for 
those with mold allergies. Molds 
tend to be worse in damp places, 
such as by the pool and in the for- 
est 

If you workaround the house 

You should: Wear glasses or 

sunglasses when mowing the 

lawn, raking leaves or gardening 



to help protect the eyes. Rinsing 
the eyes with artificial tears 
removes pollens. If necessary, 
use a particle mask, available at 
the hardware store, to help filter 
the air. 
If you Just do In 

You should: Bathe and wash 
hair when going inside, cspc- 
cially before going to bed. 
Pollen clings to hair and can 
rub off on pillows and trigger 
allergies overnight. 

For allergy sufferers who 
refuse to let their allergy symp- 
toms get the best of them, the 
American Lung Association and 
makers of Tavist have developed 
the Ycar-Round Allergy 
Management calendar. The free 
pocket-size calendar contains 
more than 50 tips to help allergy 
sufferers enjoy everything from 
the great outdoors (travel, sports, 
gardening) to looking their best 
and enjoying their home. The 
calendar is available by calling 
(900) Tavist-D (828-4783). 




^ en, on HiUc. ,Sf en *»' Mediri n 

*ss^*« 



c nristopiier r, • 

Steven a r-v 

Buf hlocZ e ' MD ' Vernal Kt^- 

° Gn >ve; 793-9800 Medic *e 

1 \f«-i.*^ 






**aceZf T te-> , 

^UndnV S™*& Vital 
n<te kn? 566-0720 ****» 
tona k w. 



M,W "!U R to ■ t 

**b OS*"**© -to 









r 



April 1 9, 1 996 JAlcdANd Newspapers IAKEUFE : , ; 



'The New Yorkers' is just one of those things 




Marriott Lincolnshire Theater's latest musical pro- 
duction, "The New Yorkers" is another one of those 
musical things, Cole Porter/George Gershwin thirtylsh 
revivals, that depends on the classic music of that era. 

Not as well known as most of Porter's other 
Broadway efforts, ergo maybe not as overdone, "The 
New Yorkers" features great songs like "Just One of 
Those Things," "I've Got You Under My Skin," and 
"Love Fore Sale." 

The orchestrations of David Slegel, musical 
arrangements of Kevin Sites and the orchestra con- 
ducted by Michael Duff, along with the outstanding 
voices of stars David Studwell, Kathryn Jaeck, and Kelli 
Cramer, are the things that make an audience give 
standing ovations as they did at the press night perfor- 
mance. 

Also notable are area favorites Paula Scrofano, Ray 
Frcwen, and Alcne Robertson, who simply can't hide In 



the ensemble be cause T qt Iter stand-out comic antics 
and that voice that destroys the crystal collection. 

Speaking of belters, Cramer puts across "The Extra 
Gal," and Joins in "Let's Do It," and "Rap-A-Tap On 
Wood," to steal a scene or two. 

The negligible book, as in most of these tap dancing 
marathons, has a mobster, Studwell, falling in love with 
an heiress, Jaeck, and they spend the rest of the 
evening telling us how their romance is doomed from 
the start and also running away from other gangsters. 
One in particular, Feet McGeehan, played by Stephen 
P. Full, tears the house down several times with his one 
liner "Hello Al." P. S. you have to be there. 

Outstanding musical numbers include Jaeck's "I've 
Got You Under My Skin," the mobsters' "Sing Sing For 
Sing Sing," and the two company finales, "I Happen To 
Like New York," and "Take Me Back To Manhattan."— Kathryn Jaeck and David 
by GLORIA DAVIS Yorkers.* 




Studwell in "The New 



LAKELIFE 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Nature Center leads way with Earth Day celebration 



i 









NEAL TUCKER 



the naturalist at the facility, often 
hears teachers tell her of children's 



Regional Editor 

There's some tomfoolery going reactions when they discover they 

at the Round Lake Area Park arc going to the nature center. 

District Children are learning "The kids are thrilled. They 

wonderful things and they don't start clapping their hands and 

even know it think the teacher is the best one in 

The Park District has a feature the world," Miller said, 

at the facilities located at 860 Hart This reaction Is satisfying to 

Rd. that most park districts don't Miller, because it tells her the main 



have — the Prairie Grass Nature 
Center and Museum. Sandy M Viler, 



mission of the nature center is 
being realized — to reach and tc ach 



the children 

"Our main mission is to edu- 
cate the children. They don't know 
about trees around them and ani- 
mals, or what was there before 
their house was built They love it" 
she said. 

The idea for the nature center 
was actually bom with a previous 
employee of the park district, but it 
did not take any arm twisting to 
have Miller sign on to the project. 




ABOVE: Sandy Miller, the natu- 
ralist at the Prairie Crass Nature 
Center and Museum, gives 
Christina Pfingsten, Round Lake, 
some hands-on experience with 
the spotted snake. LOWER LEFT: 
Kenzie Conner, Round Lake, 
looks at the turtle pond in the 
Prairie Grass Nature Center and 
Museum located at the Round 
Lake Park District. — Photos by 
Linda Chapman 



Dan Zahn sings in harmony with the earth 



Celebrate the 26th anniversary 
of Earth Day with an evening of folk 
music Join musician Dan Zahn for 
an Earth Day Concert at the Lake 
County Forest Preserves' Lake 
County Museum on Saturday, 
April 20, from 7:30 to 10 p.m. 

Zahrt's performance for the 
entire family will Include tradition- 
al folk music, blucgrass and origi- 
nal matcriaL The fee of $5 ($2 for 
youths ages four through 17), 



includes admissions to the 
Museum's exhibit galleries. 
Children ages three and under arc 
free. Reservations arc not required. 
Zahn's Earth Day Concert is 
part of the Folk Music Concert 
Series held at 7:30 p.m. on the third 
Saturday of each month at the 
Museum. Upcoming perfor- 
mances in the, series Include a 
Children's Concert with Amy 
Lowell on Sunday, April 21; Small 



Potatoes on Saturday, May 18; and 
a Children's Concert with David 
H.B. Drake on Saturday, May 18. 

The Lake County Museum is 
located in Lakcwood Forest 
Preserve on Route 176 just west of 
Fairfield Road near Wauconda. For 
more information on the Dan 
Zahn Earth Day Concert or 
upcoming performances in the 
Folk Music Concert Scries, call the 
Lake County Museum at 526-7878. 



Prior to coming to the Round Lake 
Park District roughly 10 years ago, 
Miller was a naturalist at the Grove 
in Glenview. The Grove is a nature - 
center and museum that is a flag- 
ship Miller is trying to emulate in 
central Lake County. 

The nature center is even 
more in pace with the times right 
now, in light of the Earth Day cel- 
ebration April 20. This Is the 27th 
year for celebrating Earth Day, 
which is designed to get pe0 ple to 
remember their pl anct ^ ^g 

SS tThc ^^'s ( hasit 

-Ithlnkithas;Millcrrasponds. 
*Ten years ago, you would never 

havcseenthesercdandgreenpTas- 
ttc recycling bins along the street 
We re touching the children. It is so 
important to reach the children. 
They are the conscience of the 
family." 

The Prairie Grass Nature 
Center and Museum will be lead- 
ing the way for the celebration with 
a special day planned. The exhibi- 
tion that day will feature live ani- 
mals, nature hikes through the 
wooded area behind the building, 
games, crafts, planting of a hum- 
mingbird and butterfly garden 
organic food displays and taste' 
^& and an organic gardening 

, ^° on hand will be members 
of the Chicago Hematological 
Society with a display. Millertaid 
people will also be making and sell- 
ing Earth Day T-shirts. The event 
runs that Saturday from 9;3G a.m. 
through 1230 p.m. 

Goals for the future are to con- 
tinue to build the museum aspect 
of the nature center. This year, she 
would like to include a pioneer 
trunk in the exhibits, to show the 
children what our forefathers took 
with them when they traveled 
across the plains to the west 

Regarding the nature center 
itself, Miller will be concentrating 
on organic aspects of food and gar- 
dening, because we as a nation use 
too many chemicals. The new 
study will complement the animals 
the center already has including 
snakes, turtles, hedgehogs, sala- 
manders, ferrets, rats, birds and 
many fish. 

Miller hears all the time what a 
great job she has. She doesn't deny 
the fact, but she docs not flaunt it 
either because she wants people to 
know she is actually working. 

People with any questions 
about the Prairie Grass Nature 
Center and Museum can call 740- 
9826. 



l> 



~r~n 



'■* *— - " " . ; 

VpJ W ^. .. 




LAKELIFE UkdAhd Newspapers Ap«il 19,1996 



-Kids Fare — — — 

WisconsinVSpinning Top Museum presents 'Yo-yo Day' 



Yo-yos may come and go, and 
now they are back. For the newly 
interested to the player and col- 
lector of yos-yos; a special event 
waits on Sunday, April 21 from 2 
to 5 p.m. The special day will be 
held at the world's only Spinning 
Top Museum at 533 Milwaukee 
Ave. in Burlington, Wis. 

The afternoon will include 
meeting and talking with other 
yo-yo players, perhaps even 
meeting a champion from earlier 
days, viewing a guest exhibit as 
well as the museum's yo-yo 
exhibit, a time for showing and 
demonstrating tricks where all 
visitors can participate and door 
prizes for those present. 



The event is a fund-raiser for 
the non-profit museum. Advance 
paid registration is $10 per per- 
son at the door registration Is $15 
per person. Call (414)763-3946. 

Spring entertainment 

Kathleen Gibson, author of the 
new children's interactive book 
"Zibbcr Bibber/ will host a spe- 
cial storytelling and Mother's Day 
craft session at Noodle Kidoodlc 
in Vernon Mills, Rivcrtrcc Court, 
701 N. Milwaukee Ave. in Vernon 
Hills, May 3 at 1:30 p.m. The 
event is free. 

Drama camp 

Drama Camp will be offered at 



the David Adler Cultural Center 
for children ages 7 to 14. The 
camp runs for eight weeks from 
June 18 to Aug. 9 and will culmi- 
nate with the performance of 
"You're a Good Man Charlie 
Brown." 

Children will be involved with 
all aspects of the production, 
including set and costume 
design, choreography, staging 
and acting. 

For more informaUon call Jill 
Harkaway or Justine Vaughn at 
367-0707. 

'Aladdin' 

Marriott's Lincolnshire 

Theatre for young audiences will 



present "Aladdin" April 19 to May 
19. 

Performance times vary but 
Include Wednesday and Friday 
performances at 10 a.m. and 
Saturdays at 1 1 am. 

Tickets arc $6 and arc avail- 
able by calling the box office at 
634-0200. 

'Family Day Sundays' 

Explore local history and tra- 
ditions with the staff and volun- 
teers of the Lake County Forest 
Preserves' Lake County Museum 
at Family Day Sundays. 

Join other families In the 
museum's galleries for exciting 
family-oriented activities such as 



participating in a scavenger hunt, 
making a bookmark, creating a 
memory game, or learning about 
African American history. 
Focusing on a different activity 
each week, Family Day Sundays 
will be held every Sunday from 1 
to 4 p.m. 

General admission to the 
museum is $2 for adults and $1 
for youth ages 4 to 10. Reserva- 
tions arc not required. The Lake 
County Museum Is located In 
Lakcwood Forest Preserve on Rte. 
176, just west of Fairfield Road 
near Wauconda. 

For more information call 526- 
7878.— by RHONDA DEI RICK 
BURKE 




JUST FOR KIDS! 



•THE FRENCH 
REVOLUTION 
BEGAN. 

-NORTH CAR- 
OLINA BECAME 
THE !2m STATE. 

•THE HOUSE OF 
REPRESENTATIVES 
HELB ITS FIRST 
MEETING. 

-GEORGE WASH- 
INGTON TOOK 
OFFICE AT NEW 
YORK'S FEDERAL 
HALL AS THE FIRST 
UNITE* STATES' 
PRESIDENT. 











####### 



II 


7 


2 


^H 


^4| 


II 








[^t0 


51 






6 






9 


■ 












11 







CLUES ACROSS 

I . Respect is something you 

4. Tears come out when you 

6. A place that shows plays. 

7. A group of animals. 

I I . One, three and five are all numbers. 

12. It's nice to go swimming when the weather is — 



CLUES DOWN 

1. The only planet known to support life. 

2. A great one is the Amazon. 

3. Emergency Room 

5. If s called the Big Apple. New 

7. Where you would wear a hat. 

8. The opposite of subtract. 



Find the States 



U H N 


GGADIROLF 


T U E 


LFDBOVNLC 


A N V 


IRBCWBAUN 


H G A 


ERAWALEDA 


J A D 


ANBSRQVOR 


L R A 


VERMONTDF 


I Y N 


BNVGHYPER 


G D I 


OIETSABCA 


NEB 


RASKAWIEN 


I C K 


DMNGXY I EO 


M Z G 


ONIDELARZ 


O Q R 


I VADTAWG I 


Y C G 


HSPFCTAVR 


W B N 


OGEROIHSA 



There are fourteen of the United States hid- 
den throughout the scrambled puzzle 
below. See how many you can find and cir- 
cle. The words go horizontally and vertical- 
ly, backwards and forwards. 



WYOMING 

NEBRASKA 

MAINE 

VERMONT 

ARIZONA 

FLORIDA 

HAWAII 



OREGON 

UTAH 

IOWA 

DELAWARE 

NEVADA 

TEXAS 

OHIO 



■ 




on "01. peaH'Z PPV 'V V°A 'V "b"3 G &WZ 1 UB 3 i 

UMOQ 

l°H2l PPO'U pi&H'l ioiceuj. 9 Ai0"fr u«8 'I 

ssojsy 

sieMsuy 



WIT1 110 ROMS Kttllll 
UMHCT. TIE 1VII TOOTM 

we« m vonrt tauut 
munis mil 

1*74*1** _ 

CUUItfJ 

1,454 FOOT 

ttMSTOVHt 

VU • HIT. 




TIEMNMCl 
IffTTEftMOf 
MMrTHMEKia 

numiTioo- 

WHSOfMlEt 
IMIVEJUtTO 

m ii viim ii 
■Diet in win 





THE PLANE! URANUS SPir^S 

AT A SPEED THAT MAKES ON! 
OF IIS OAVS EQUAL 10 17 

EARTH HOURS, BUT IT TAKES 
VERY LONG TO ORBIT THE 

SUN, MAKING ONE OF ITS 

YEARS IAST 84 OF OURS. 




Now 
Playing 



FOX LAKE THEATRE 

(847)973-2800 



Birthday Parties • Fundraisers • Dare Skates 



THE #1 REASON TO ROLLER SKATE 



IV s Fun L< And you may meet 

a very "Special Friend" 

Village Skate Roller Rink 

(Next to Ro gaii's Shoes) 
Mundelein, IL 566-2120 



Birthday Parties • Fundraisers • Dare, Skates 



--. 










&? 

^*%/ 



a 



it 




The Week of 

OUNG* CHILD 



ApniL 21-27. 





*w* 




Experiences, as well as biology, make a baby's brain grow 



Why quality care 
is important 

A "Newsweek" article of Feb. 19 
confirmed what early childhood edu- 
cators have known for years. "A baby's 
brain/ the article noted, "is a work in 
progress, trillions of neurons waiting 
to be wired into the mind." 

When the tiny neurons in the 
brain link up, the baby begins.to 
use the brain as a thinking organ. In 
these earliest years circuits in the 
baby's brain start to connect and lay 
the groundwork for the child to 
team language, music, math and 
even emotions. A responsive care- 
giver — smiling, talking, singing to 
the infant — provides the environ- 
ment that allows the brain to make 
those connections. 
I y, Without proper stimulation in 
the critical early months and years, 
an opportunity for brain develop- 



ment is lost. That is why the mem- 
bers of the Child Care Coalition of 
Lake County are dedicated to ensur- 
ing that our youngest citizens 
receive the quality care and educa- 
tion that will help them reach their 
full potential. 

The Child Care Coalition of Lake 
County is a not-for-profit organiza- 
tion of agencies and individuals 
working together to advocate for 
quality child care and education. 
The Coalition welcomes anyone who 
lives, works or provides business or 
civic leadership in Lake County and 
who is concerned about meeting the 
needs of children and their families 
through quality care. The Coalition 
coordinates, rather than duplicates, 
the efforts of the many groups in 
Lake County who are striving to 
enhance the quality of life for all our 
children and families. 

For further information on the 
Child Care Coalition of Lake County 
call (847)360-6885. 




One-on-one interactions lay the groundwork for a lifetime of learning. — Photo by 
Carol Brusslan, Family Network 



Week of Young Child begins with family entertainment 



Marionette trapeze artist Miss 
Katrina, an old fashion band and 
dancers from India will entertain 
Sunday, April 21, in the showcourt 
area of Curnee Mills Mall when the 
Child Care Coalition of Lake County 
begins its annual celebration of the 
Week of the Young Child. The three- 
hour event begins at 12:30 p.m. 

In keeping with the theme of the 
1 996 Week of the Young Child— 
"Speak Up/Speak Out. ..Protecting 
Our Children" — boys and girls will 
receive prizes when they turn in toy 



weapons. Curnee Mills stores wi 
display "20 Terrific 
Toys" that encourage 
constructive play. 

During the 
Curnee Mills event 
parents will be 
able to take steps 
to speak out 
against violence. The 
League of Women 
Voters of Lake Bluff will 
hold a voter registra- 
tion and Parents 





Unplugged will 
offer suggestions 
about promoting 
quality television 
programs. Other 
highlights 
include face 
painting, arts 
and crafts tables 
and a display of winning 
posters in which local 
children convey their ideas 
for creating a peaceful Lake 
County. 



The Child Care Coalition of Lake 
County's celebration is part of a 
national effort to draw attention to 
young children as the country's 
most valuable resource. The 
National Association for the 
Education of Young Children is the 
sponsor nationwide. 

See more stories in this special 
section for details on the Curnee 
Mills kickoff and other ways to cele- 
brate the Week of the Young Child. 
—by CAROL BRUSSLAN, M.Ed., 
Family Network 



A 







jLindenhurst Early Childhood Centers 

/j noti* accepting eMofirnejitJbu- 



Summer or Fall 



Pie 



gr or jm 
School 



•2 1/2-5 Year Olds 

•9am-11:30am/12:30prfr3pm 

•Not combined w/Day Care 

•Socialization/Structured 
Program 

«4yr. Degreed leathers 



Full Day Private 
Kindergarten 

•Certified Teachers, 12-1 ratio 
Mndviduaitied centers 

•Computers, educational 
games, art, physical 
development 
• Nutritional lunches 

id snacks 
r3\«Before& After 
School Care 
Included 



Full Day Care 

•2 1/2-5 Year Olds 
•Structured Setting 
•6;30-6,-00 p.m, Coverage 
•Weekly Themes & Topics 

Ind. Speakers & Trips 
•irt-Room Computers 

Unguage_Arts Class 



I 

V '.:V ■ 



.*&y 




e$KUi3mx:<»>;K 



309 Granada Blvd* • Iindenhurstt IL 



1 ■' 



A 






:l/i Bile So, of Grand Ave* 



;.,.*.'.*. w',<.. 



IDCFS Llcensod 
■ R#f*fwv»* AvsUabit < 



The Week of the Young Child 

The Week of the Young Child is an annua] campaign (hat draws attention to our coun- 
ty's greatest national resource - our children. The Child Care Coalition of I *>"■ 
County is taking part in the advocacy campaign sponsored by the National 
Association for the Education of Young Children and supported by its Chicago Metro 
group. The aim of these early childhood educators is to mobilize the community to 
positive action on behalf of the rights and needs of young children. 

In conjunction with the Child Care Coalition of Lake County, we are proud to pub- 
lish this very special section to help raise the consciousness of our community and to 
celebrate the "Week of the Young Child." 

Lakeland Newspapers is committed to providing comprehensive information on 
quality child care to parents, providers and businesses alike. 

We welcome your support and invite your comments. 

Esther D. Hebbird — Display Advertising Manager f olr f>1 o -ri ft 



Carol BnttSJan —Editor, Child Care Coalition of Lake County 
Rhonda Hetrick Burfca— Editor in Chief 
Rosalia Lava— Composition Manager 



Newspapers 
(847) 223-8161 




WEEK OF THE YOUNG CHILD LaIceM Nlws|>a|)e«s Apml 1 9, 1 996 




'eel of the\OllflG CHltD 




J 




Three easy ways parents can influence elected officials 



Do you ever feel that our elected 
officials don't understand, that 
they're out of touch with the real 
world where we struggle with the 
problems of work and family life? 
Well, there are three easy ways to 
give them the message— pick up a 
pen, pick up the phone and pick up 
a ballot. 

Very few people bother to call or 
write their legislators when they 
have an opinion. There are excep- 
tions, of course, when mail, calls 
and faxes pour in on controversial 
issues. On those rare occasions mail 
is separated into "for" and "against" 
and weighed, rather than counted. . 

But most of the time legislators 
know that each letter or call repre- 
sents thousands of people who think 
similar thoughts. So if you write say- 
ing, for example, "Please increase 
funding for Head Start because there 
wasn't room for my child," you rep- 
resent thousands of constituents who 
want that increase. 

Legislators are easy to find. Each 
one has an office in the district that 
elected him/her, which is listed in 
the phone book. If you need the 
Springfield or Washington informa- 
tion, the local office can provide it. 
Write or call when you read that 



an issue you care about is being dis- 
cussed in the legislature. The news- 
paper usually gives you the name, 
the number, and/or the primary 
sponsor of the bill in which the issue 
is covered — which isn't always obvi- 
ous! Include this information in your 
letter. 

State your position clearly and 
concisely. There is nothing wrong 
with expressing your emotions, so 
long as you do so in a polite man- 
ner. Calling a Senator disrespectful 
names is not likely to win her over. 
And ranting on for pages decreases 
the chances that your ideas will be 
understood and appreciated. 

You will probably get a written 
response if you write. 

If you call, you'll probably talk to 
a legislative aide. Such aides are 
auxiliary eyes and ears for their 
bosses. Follow the same rules as for 
writing sb the aide can pass a .clear 
message on to your Representative 
or Senator. .' 

Constituent messages are very 
helpful to legislators. Right now, the 
Illinois Legislature is considering 
giving us a chance to vote on a pro- 
posal to change the method of pay- 
ing for schools. Governor Edgar has 
recommended increasing the income 



For Your Child 




Good Shepherd 
Christian Preschool 



Register 
NowForFaW 



25100 W. Grand Ave., Lake Villa, IL 60046 Q e~J2~„ 

• Open 75 CMdren floea 3-6 ODO'l 7(0 

die offer your children a dcve/opmentaffy appropriate carr/cufam, in a taarrn, 
(ouing, caring, Chri&tian atmosphere. 



NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY 

Qoo<J Sh»ph»fd ChrMtan Pwchool do«« not «»crimln«l» on lh» batla ct Nllgloii'. phynlcil orrn»rrt«l 
h*ndte*p. or national or athnlo origin. -■ 



Q.S.C.P. It ticeniid by the DcpL of Children &. Family Service*, State ofilUnoU 




KIDDIE UNIVERSITY 

mfCrxnof/MmRsmsGHm 



mms&fti 



We welcome your 3-5 year old child for our 2-1/2 hour pre- 
school programs. The school is state licensed and employs a 
staff of certified teachers. 

Call Now for Fall *96 Registration 

356-2718 

37240 Granada, Lake Villa 



Q nt>nnt>on[>ont>oooont>oni>QDt>QDi>obt>oD>ODo^oDt>oD[>oai>o 



Children's Corner Montessori School 

"4 meeting place bringing home and learning together. " 

847-548-2880 



ACCEPTING FALL ENROLLMENTS 



IE 






a 

o 
a 
v 
n 
v 

rO 

in 
v 
o 
D 

V 

n 
O 

a 
v 

o 
a 

a 






GEOMETRIC SOLIDS 



WATER PLAY 



WORLD MAP 



A quality educetioneJ program of development*! •Wll. combining Monteeeori with enrichment grow*. 
Ago 3-6 years Including Stata Roglstwd Kindergarten 



r ionrxinn^DQODO^ao^nfxiQO^MnonQOUO^nn^nn^uu^OO^a 



9 

o 

D 
O 

a 
<? 
o 

a 

7 

O 

a 

7 

O 



tax while decreasing the property 
tax and providing more state funding 
for education. 

Illinois schools get. less than a third 
of their funding from the state, and 
many are in financial trouble. Our leg- 
islators know the schools need more 
money and that property taxes are too 



high, but they are afraid that we will 
only hear "higher taxes" and vote them 
out of office. Let them know you are 
smarter than that. 

But also be smart enough to send 
the ultimate political message:, i0? 
VOTEI— by DONNA LOUNDY, - 
National Council of Jewish Women 



Ways to speak up for kids 

Encouraging children to turn in their toy weapons at Gurnee Mills on Sunday, 
April 21, is one way parents can speak out to protect their children. Here are some 
other suggestions: 

• Take part in 'Take Your Children to Work Da/' on 
Wednesday, April 24. Taking a tangible reminder of your 
child to your workplace reminds employers and col- . 
leagues that every working parent needs someone to 
provide quality child care in order to take and keep a 
job. At the Gurnee Mills event preschool teachers will 
be available in the arts and crafts area to help children 
make cardboard replicas of themselves that their parents 
can wear to work. 

• Take part in the Doll Campaign. Send dolls to 
elected officials to encourage their support of child care. 
Work with your preschool or day care center to assem- 
ble dolls from construction paper, using the cutout on 
this page (enlarge to 24-inches for maximum impact). 
Have children decorate each doll with bits of fabric, etc. and send with a name tag 
(first name only) to each of your state and national representatives along with a note 
thanking them for supporting measures to secure quality child care. 





S^ "please" and "thank you " • Wash my hanxjs bofore ' ^t • Take' 

people have feelings too. • Le< rn, fro 

Respect plants a 

Respect books. • 

ways before I crc 

you." * Wash m 

actions. •. Get ale 

tions. Learning is 

Flush the toilet. * 

and animals. * C 

Make choices ant 

Sing lots of song 

It's ok to ma[ 



How direc- 
feelings.too, * 
Respect plants 
Ask questions, 
up my mess. • 
Respect books. 



At Children's World * we teach the skills that will impact your child for 
| the rest of his or her life.. . like dcvelopmentally-appropriate academics, > * Clea n 
socialization, emotional development, self-esteem and taking responsi- ?. * t 



bility for one's own actions. Wc' ve created four unique learning pro- 



up my mes 

.1 grams that will help your child develop and grow. 

ways before! ,• Early Impressions* for infants (select centers), toddlers & twos 
you" « Wa r l *P a % v °y s; * Beginning Preschool for 3- and young '+-ycar-olds 

actions. ♦ G 
tioris. Learni 



1 Pathways Preschool Plus/^ for 4- and 5-year-olds 

■ Quest 4 Fun* for school-agers, kindergarten to 12 years old 



soak both 
|d "thank 
j|y for my 
fcw^direc- 
itgs too, • 



It's ok to make mistakes. * Learning is fun. n Listen. •■ I am special 



Vernon Hills 

841 W. End Court 

680-9090 

5 Phillip Rd. # 
680-7771 

# Infant program offered 



Buffalo Grove 

651 West Busch Rd. 

459-6995 




Children's World 

LEARNING CENTERS. 



Quality Child Care • Pretchool 
Pro-Kindergarten • School-Age Programs 



ONE WEEK FREE 



l 



I 

I 

I After enrolling and paying a registration fee you will receive your 2nd week free! 

Iror newty enrolled children ont/ Present thu coupon it i«ne o( enrolment Multiple or duplcate enrollment offer* not allowed Otter Subject to (enter . 
iwntipjtcn and avdiLiule ipxe. liibnt progiarm not included Olfer e«pirei7/lflG 5000217 I' 

| O I WG Ch.kJ'in'j World ley ring C enters, [nc All rights reserved 



h 



fy 




Ap»il 19, 1996 UkUNd Newspapers -WEEK OF THE YOUNG CHILD I 



&*.. 




eek of theVOLlllG CHltD 






Stop homes from becoming a battlegrounds 



No family is stress free. Stress is a 
normal part of life and is to be 
expected when you combine the 
demands of job, children, spouses and 
personal needs. While you can't 
change' stressful situations, there is a 
lot you can do to keep stress down. A 
few guides: Talk to someone close to 
you, set priorities, get enough rest, 
limit alcohol use, think positively,- 
learn to say no gracefully, pick your 
battles carefully, etc. 

Family violence is an epidemic. 
Nobody deserves to be hit. While the 
causes of family violence are many 
and complex, studies show that sub- 
stance abuse plays a major role, as do 
emotional and financial stress. There 
are groups in Lake County working to 
foster more parenting programs, 
implement conflict resolution curricu- 
la in the classroom, reduce stress in 
the workplace. Just recently the Lake 
County Unites for VIP-Violence 
Intervention and Prevention published 
a set of recommendations encourag- 
ing a county wide approach, 
Framework For Action Creating a 
Peaceful Lake County One Person At 
A Time. 

r The Business Round table of the 
.Child Care Coalition of Lake County 
and Lake County Unites For Violence 
Intervention and Prevention (VIP) are 
sponsoring their second annual poster 



contest as part of the Week 
of the Young Chijd celebra- 
tion with plans to create a 
1997 calendar. Contest win- 
ners will be announced at 
the Week of the Young 
Child celebration at Gurnee 
Mills, April 21. More than 
300 children took park in a 
poster contest last year in 
celebration of the Week of 
the Young Child. The theme 
Peace-ing the Puzzle helped 
in the creation of numerous 
unique posters and a calen- 
dar for 1 996. 

The mission of VIP is to build a 
non-violent community in Lake 
County by promoting self and mutual 
respect, empowering people with 
resources, skills and alternative choic- 
es to manage feelings and solve prob- 
lems. Framework For Action: Creating 
a Peaceful Lake County One Person At 
A Time was created through the col- 
laborative efforts of 1 60 policy mak- 
ers, impactors, clergy, health care 
criminal justice professionals, educa- 
tors and youth. The Child. Care 
Coalition is a member of this partner- 
ship of community members. For 
more Information call Barbara Haley 
at (847)360-6733 at the Lake County 
Health Department.— fay BARBARA 
HALEY, M.A., R.N., N.H.A. 



"$ o trig @ foe l$ Tfffif'&'i 




jTBnF Lake County Family YMCA 

|8r CHILD CARE & 

LEARNING CENTERS 

SAFE ■ PUN ■ AFFORDABLE 




Check Us Out! 

d Competent,. d Educational t& Planned 

Caring Staff Programs Activities 

d State Licensed d Sliding Fee Scale d Special 
d Summer Camps d Hot Lunch & Field Trips 

Snacks 

Waukegan Center Mundelein Center 
2415 N. Butrick 706 Hawley St. 

(847) 662-1335 (847) 949-0060 



UnltBdWa'u 

Lata C.»-i, 



Open Mon. thru Fri. 6:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Children Ages 2-5 



Children conveyed their feelings about peace in the 1995 poster contest. Winning 
entries illustrated a calendar similar to one that will be created from 1996 poster 
contest winners. 



SUMMER DAY CAMPS 



Beach Park, Diamond Lake, Gray slake, Lake Villa, 
Libertyville, & Vernon Hills 

At Your Local Public School 

Age- Appropriate Activities! 

Sports Swimming # Field Trips 

Flexible Scheduling! 

(Open 6am~-6pm) 




1. SUMMER CAMP 

Recreational activities for 5-7 years 
in group and individual instruction. 



2. SUPER SUMMER CAMP 

A program designed for 8-10 years to 
challenge young active minds as well 
as fun-filled recreational activities. 



3. YOUNG TEEN CAMP 
A summer of fun activities for campers 
10-14 years to explore and learn 
interesting things. 

REGISTER NOW! 
CALL 548-2283 

for more information. 



We Make Great Memories! 9 







M 






f 




WEEK OF THE YOUNG CHILD UkcUd Newspapers - April 19, 1996 



i 

s 




eek of The 




CHltD 






•0- 



o 



* 




Lake County Health Dept. offers spring health tips 



It's not too early to make appointments 
for children's physician examinations 
needed for chilrJ care, kindergarten, fifth 
and ninth grade entrance. Immunizations 
may also need updating at this physician 
visit. The Lake County Health Dept. pro- 
vides medical and immunization clinics 
throughout Lake County. 

Now that spring has officially arrived 
and we all want to oe outdoors more, this 
is a great time to review safety rules with 
children. 

• Wear helmets and other protective 
gear when riding a bicycle, using roller 
skates or blades or a skate board 

• Never hang onto a moving vehicle 
when roller skating, roller blading or skate 
boarding 

• Designate areas/boundaries where 
children may ride or skate 

Protect children from harmful expo- 
sure to the sun 

• Use sun screen products as directed 



• Limit sun time to before 1 a.m. and 
after 2 p.m. 

• Use head and body clothes/coverings 
to reduce exposure to sun's harmful rays 

Springtime is also a good time to 
cheoc the backward or play equipment. 
Make sure sandboxes are clean and that 
protective surfaces around slides and 
swings have enough sand or mulch. Look 
for obvious signs of damage or decay. 

• Fallen tree limbs or branches 

• Exposed rock, dangerous holes 

• Insect nests (ants, spiders, hornets) 

• Human pollution, bottles, cans, 
pieces of glass 

• Swing ropes that are not properly 
attached or are frayed 

Handwashing knows no season! 
Reteach, reinforce, remind children (of all 
agesl) to wash hands after playing out- 
doors, handling pets, before eating or han- 
dling food, after using the toilet, anytime 
hands come in contact with body 




The Wee Kink Centen 
Day Cane And Pneschool 



Inviting All Children 

AgeS 3 tO 5 Years Old. 'Loving Care 

. anaa ■ 

stimulating 

environment.' 



949_8671 

1 500 W. Hawley 
Mundelein, IL 60060 




WSJ** 



^ ^l"CA Mp— J ^/studies 

Crafts 

Dance 

Gymnastics 

Fieldtrips 

Orff Music 

Computers 



'Year Round Enrollment* 

CREATIVE 
MONTESSORI 




exclusively 

for children 

2-6 years old 





3Z*Jmmn 



949-6340 



' 1220 S. Lake St. 
Miindelciiu IL I 



Millburn Church 
Early Learning Center 

A dcvelopmentally appropriate Christian 

preschool serving children age 3-5. 

Half day programs. 

Now enrolling for Fall 

847 / 356-5237 

Licensed hy tttinms Department of Children & Family Services. 




Al ihc corner of 
Grass Lake Road 
and Rome 45 in 
Millburn, Illinois 



iMZ3&± =,* \ 




Kennedy Child Care Center 

speaks up against violence.*- 
we support healthy play! 



• Summer Camp Ages 6-10 

• Open 6:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 

• DCFS Licensed 



'•'For L more information 
or^to' schedule i a tour of the-' facility, 

can (847)578-3896 



j.i 



Accredited by the ..... . 

National Academy Of MWV VAi? 
Early Childhood, Programs fyfijrftQ 

Charlene Ackerman ExecutivtfDirector-K 



fluids {blood, urine, drool, stool, nose 
drainage, etc) Warm running water, soap 
and latner, scrubbing all hand surfaces 
(under fingernails too), rinsing and drying 



well are all necessary components of 
effective handwashing. — by CHARLENE 
HENDRICKSON, R.N., C, N.HA, Lake 
County Health Dept 



LCHD Immunization Clinics 



Antioch Clinic 
VFW Post 4551 
75 North Ave. 
Antioch 

Highland Park Clinic 
Highland Park Hospital 
718 Glenview 
Highland Park 

Mundelein Clinic 
American Legion Post 867 
20886 Park Ave. 
Mundelein 

Round Lake Clinic 
American Legion Hall 
111 E. Main St. 
Round Lake Park 

Zion Clinic 
Shiloh Center 
Emmaus and 27th St. 
Zion 

Waukegan Clinics 
Belvidere Medical Bldg, 
2400 Belvidere 
Waukegan 



Third Wednesday 
of each month 



Fourth Friday 
of each month 



9-11 a.m. 



9-11 a.m. 



Fourth Wednesday 9-11 a.m. 

of each month 



Second Wednesday 9-11 am. 
of each month 



Third Friday 
of each month 



Mondays 
Tuesdays 
Thursdays 



9-11 a.m. 



1 - 3 p.m. 

8 a.m. - 1 p.m. 

1 - 3 p.m. 



No appointments necessary. $6 per vaccine (cash, checks or Public Aid Card) 
No one will be turned away due to inability to pay. 




Grayslake area 

148 Center Street 




PUBLIC LIBRARY 

(847) 223-5313 

Hours: 
Monday through Friday 
10:00 a.m. -9:00 p.m. 

Saturdays 
10:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 




"BOOK SOME TIME 
WITH YOUR CHILD!" 



Kids Grow With <5|«r< 

Bicycle & Accessory Sale: 

4/19/96-4/26/96. 





Grow with Giro 

Kids grow quickly. We 
knowthot. That's why 
we offer our *Gorw 
with Giro" program. 
You get a $10 dis- 
count when you 
trade-in a Mud shaker 
or Mlnlmoto for any 
larger Giro helmet. 



Trek Trailer 



Tail win cfs 



1616 E. .Belvidere Rd. 
Grayslake. IL 60030 

(847) 223-17-98 




cannondale 

HANDMADE IN USA 



TREKusa 



Hours: 

M,W.Th,F10-7 

Sot. 9-5; Sun. 12-4 

Closed Tuesday 




f 



. 



j 

V 












■• „ 



kr 



April 19, 199,6 ..UklANd Newspapers WEEK OF THE YOUNG CHILD 




L 



)-7 

lay 




eelc of 




CHID 



'■ , 






>r 



] 



\ 




TV nrogrammin! 



In response to what they feel is 
inappropriate programming either 
targeted at children 
or aired when chil- 
dren are likely to be 
in the viewing audi- 
ence, a Lake County 
based organization 
"Parents Unplugged" 
serves as a nation- 
wide resource to con- 
cerned parents. They 
host an annual boy- 
cott during which 
they encourage par- 
ents to unplug their 
televisions and boy- 
cott products of 1 
• major corporations 
during the month of 
September. 

"We do not advo- 
cate censorship," says 
co-founder, Jordan 
Madorsky, "we are only saying 
'Caution: children are present/ 
What children often see on daytime 
and early prime time television is 
often sexually explicit and violent 
% beyond their comprehension.* 

He explains, "\ am tired of the 



overly-simplistic, patronizing enter- 
tainment executives Who often sug- 





gratuitous sexual comments and 
double entendres. Even when the 
show itself is perfectly wholesome, 
we are often assaulted without 
warning by a 15-second promotion- 
al spot featuring the most sexually 
provocative or violent scenes from 
shows that caring parents won't let 
their kids watch. Why should I have 
to put my TV in the trunk of the car 
while I run to the grocery store, just 
to prevent my young teenager from 
tuning in to a sleazy talk show in 
my brief absence?* 

Adds his partner, co-founder 
Susan Kaplan, "In every other area 
we constantly make accommoda- 
tions for the immaturity and sensi- 
bilities of children. We drive slower 
when school children are present, 



gest, 'Don't use TV as a babysitter,' 
Watch TV with your child,' and, 
'Just turn it off.' I watch television 
with my children and I often have to 
wieid the remote control like a 
video game joystick to protect my 
children from blindsided attacks. 
Programs targeted specifically at 
children are often peppered with 



DeqrbaVen 



! A CH1U3 WE & LEARNING CENTER I 



Affitiuttnl iril/i Lake f'orcxf Hitspitttl 



1100 N. Westmoreland Rd. 

Lake Forest, IL 60045 

(847) 234-6175 



Dearhaven 

is proud 

to celebrate 

"Week of the Young Child. 1 ' 



Care And 

Education For 

Children 

6 Weeks Thru The 

Kindergarten Year 



Accredited by the 

National Academy 

of Early Childhood 

Programs 




Child Care Resource 
& Referral 



If you are a parent seeking quality care, or a provider 

considering offering quality child care, then the YWCA of 

Northeastern Illinois has important, comprehensive, educational 

and valuable information for you through its 

"Child Care Resource and Referral Service, " 





*S 



Information For Parents: 



Information For Providers: 



^ 



•Licensed & licensed exempt 
family daycare homes 
and daycare centers. 

•In-Home Care 

•Pre-Schools 
•Summer Camps 
Parents Please Call: . 

1-800-CHILD76 



II 



'• 1. 

of Northeastern Illinois 

Locattdin IhiBtMdtrtCtnttr 

Wauttgan, HUnoii 6008S 



•Training to provide 
quality child care 

•■Start-up" assistance.. 

•Referrals. 

Provider PleaseCalf 
(847) 662-4283 
(815) 459-2644 



we refrain from telling an adult joke 
until children are out of earshot, we 
close our bedroom doors. We only 
want children to be allowed to grow 
and mature at their own pace, not 
being confronted daily with adult 
fare. No child should have access to 
this stuff." < 

They encourage all similarly 
concerned parents to contact them 
at (847)872-1600 for further infor- 
mation. They will also be a part of 
the Week of the Young Child gather- 
ing held on Sunday, April 21 at 
Gurnee Mills from 12:30 to 3 p.m. 
Be sure to stop by their booth where 
the co-founders will be on hand to 
talk with you and distribute informa- 
tion.— by SUSAN KAPLAN, M.Ed., 
Parents Unplugged 



<Mdj Tots Ftoy Scdoot ^d Dcy Cou Cad* Tic. 

1717 • 1719 Lewis Ave.. Zion,- IL 60099 
847-872-2511 



Programs 
lor children 
ages 3 thru 8 




Mon. Thru Fri. 
6:00 a.m. 
to 
6:00 p.m. 



Terryl Rajcevich 
Director 



'TOMMY'S HAVING 

DIFFICULTY IN 

SCHOOL LATELY... 

ARE THERE PROBLEMS 

AT HOME?" 

When Mom and Dad have 
problems, their children also feel 
stress. Often times a child's grades 
will fall and he or she becomes 
distracted and withdrawn. 

The Bradley Counseling Center can help work out 
problems; helping parents to overcome their conflicts and 
help children realize that if s not their fault that Mommy 
and Daddy are fighting. 

Bradley Counseling Center can help with a number of 
emotional problems including anxiety, stress, anger 
management, marital and family conflict problems in 
school, loneliness, depression, suicidal feelings, eating 
disorders and substance abuse. Bradley also offers 
psychological testing and counseling for children under 5. 

Health insurance accepted. 




Bradley Counseling Center 



[fj v,J bo)i: 



Lake Villa 
' Grand Avenue 
356-3322° 



Waukegan 

2835 Belvidere Road 

244-7177 



J 



1 



i 







WEEK OF THE YOUNG CHILD UlcE^d NewspAptns Apnil 1 9, 1 996 




. k 




! / 



*'L 



vr 



Week 





the 



Young Child 

Ap«il 21-.2Z, lPPff 



V 

\ 






\ 



\ 



\ 



w 



-J 



Vf 



vr 



O 



Sunday, April 21 

12:30 to 3:30 p.m. 
Gurnee Mills Mall Opening Celebration 

Wednesday, April 24 

'Take Your Child to Work Day" 

Parents wear pin-on dolls representing their child or 

children who need quality child care while the parent 

works. r 

Ongoing through week 

Art work from local preschools and day care centers is 
on display in store windows at Gurnee Mills Mall. 

WTTW Channel 11 Celebration April 21-27: 

A Welcome for Every Child" special documentary 
features a family from Paris and another from Chicago 
who have different choices in child care and preschool. 
The program also explains how new findings on brain 
development influence national early childhood 
education policies. 

"Chicago Tonight" panel discussing how best to 
prepare our youngest and most vulnerable citizens for 
success in school and life. 

Check local listing for dates and times. 



Messiah Lutheran Pre-School 

Celebrating 
Our 20th Year 

• Quality Curriculum in a 
Christian Environment 

• Professional Caring and 
Experienced Staff 

(847)526-7479 

25225 West Ivanhoe Road » Wauconda 




O 











-y 



W ~J 



AAVW Nursery School 

jgfl&y As Unique As Your Child. 

Nestled In a quiet residential area, we have been educating 
Lake County's young children since 1953. Our teachers, some of 
whom have been with us more than 20 years, are degreed Early 
Childhood professionals. We offer a program of the highest quality 
which encourages each child to reach her or his full potential 
socially, emotionally. Intellectually and physically. 

Please visit our specially designed building and spacious, fenced 
playground. We offer half-day classes for children aged 2 1/2 
through 5 years. 

FOR A COMPLIMENTARY SESSION 

can 623-0550 

2500 Northern Ave,, Waukegan ; 

Accredited by the National Academy of Early Childhood Programs. 



V 





PREPARING CHILDREN 
SPIRITUALLY AND ACADEMICALLY FOR THE FUTURE 

• Christ-Centered Curriculum 

• Nurturing Staff 

• Fun & Friendly Atmosphere 

• Daycare & Preschool for Ages 3-5 Years 

• Open 6:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Monday - Friday 

Kindergarten Readiness - for children entering Kindergarten in the fall of '96. 
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR SUMMER 

134 Monaville Road _ __ ,,.__ ^__^ 
Lake Villa C »" *65-0580 



Rssii^- 



f m huii ii muww i Tin 



MMrnM^^M 





Apail 19, 1996 UIceU^ NewspApcss WEEK OF THE YOUNG CHILD |g| 





CHILD 




& 




Child Care Coaltion of Lake County sends message around world 



The huge success of the 1 995 
Week of the Young Child Campaign 
brought an overwhelming wave of 
media attention and accolades to 
our community. 

The "PEACing the Puzzle" theme 
which emphasized how a community, 
parents and teachers could come 
together in working toward an end to 
rampant violence was carried in news- 
papers across the country. As a result 
of an Associated Press article, a 
reporter from the Sunday London 
Times conducted an interview, and an 
impressive article featured our work 
here in the United States. 

The Child Care Coalition is proud 



to have a group of members who both 
advocate and produce wor 1 that is to 
be replicated. This past fal Dolores 
Hermann, director of Dea. jven Early 
Learning Center and I spok* to a group 
of educators about our efforts to teach 
peace at the annual National Assn. for 
the Education of Young Children 
Conference. 

This year, we continue in our cam- 
paign and the 1 996 Week of the Young 
Child theme is "Speak Up/Speak 
Out... Protecting Our Children." 

Once again, Lake County has an 
opportunity to show the rest of the 
country that we advocate and prac- 
tice actions which keep children 



-Dear MARilyN 



Dear Marilyn: 

My son is about to have a very "unhappy" birthday. He has told all 
his friends, cousins, neighbors and grandparents that all he wants for his 
birthday is a toy gun. My husband and I are equally as determined that 
he doesn't get one. Any advice would be appreciated. 

What a dilemma. But also a wonderful opportunity to let your son 
know that violence is not OK. This is a difficult message, given the vio- 
lent world we live in. 

It will become your responsibility to broaden his interests by offering 
him a rich assortment of other toys and props that will help him grow 
and develop. 

What gun play does is teach children all the wrong things. He is still 
working through the differences between fact and fiction. He will need 
your support and understanding, as well as opportunities to feel a sense 
of power. There really are other exciting and interesting toys to play with. 
Show him, tell him, lead him. 

Editor's note: Marilyn Straus, an Early Childhood Specialist, continues 
her column "Dear Marilyn" a service of the Child Care Coaltion of Lake 
County. For questions or concerns send them to Dear Marilyn, c/o Child 
Care Coalition of Lake County, P.O. Box 12523, Highland Park, IL 60035 



ft********************************************* 



* 
* 
* 

* 
* 
* 
k 
k 
k 
* 

* 
* 



God Bless Our Children - 
They Are Our Future! 

Best Wishes From; 




\ (J/enofo* (3&detmeQj. r^o^ Q/fam 



3Wr DISTRICT OF ILLINOIS 

ASSISTANT MAJORITY LEADER 

STATE SENATE 




••••••••A************************************* 



ABCDEFGHMKC. 



m ..7m , «• - a 700W.RolllMRd^ROBDdlafceHel|Wi 

Children s Discovery Center a *«* oiscwciy rresc&ooi 

Visit us during the Week of the Young Child for special events and projects 

ALLWEEKLONG 

Ask About Our Summer Day Camp - Preschool 
and Child Care Programs. 

Call 546-3383 



ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPORSTUUWXYZ 



Redeemer Lutheran Early Learning Center 



Little Flock 

Preschool 

& Day Care 



DAY CARE HOURS: 
6:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 




Register Now.- 

Summer & Fall 

Preschool 

Programs! 



620 Grove Avenue - Waukegan, Illinois - (847 / 336-4892 



safe and secure. 

We Invite the parents, grandpar- 
ents and children in our community 
to attend the 1 996 Week of the 



Young Child event and have a happy 
and meaningful afternoon. — by 
CHARLENE ACKERMAN, M.Ed., 
Kennedy Child Care Center 




Kylee Ccresa, 5 (left) and his friend Justin Pincombe, 5, participate in a coopera- 
tive cooking activity at the Paul K. Kennedy Child Care Center, VA North Chicago. 
The "Peace Curriculum" at the center emphasizes conflict resolution through 
cooperative activities. — Photo by Charlene Ackerman 



SMALL WORLD PRE-SCHOOL 



ih 



f 

"WE GIVE YOUR CHILD THE BEST IN LOVING CARE" 




•QUALIFIED STAFF 
•STATE LICENSED 
•FULL & HALF DAY SESSIONS 
•YEAR ROUND CREATIVE 
PROGRAMS AGES 15 MONTHS - 4TH GRADE 
•5 ACRES SUPERVISED PLAYGROUND 
•OVER 25 YEARS EXPERIENCED CARE 



BEFORE & AFTER 

SCHOOL CARE 

WOODLAND 

SCHOOL DISTRICT 



^ 



18749 GRAND (RT. 132) GURNEE 

(1/4 MILE E. OF BT. 45 ON RT. 132) 



356-1 350 g 1 



DEERFIELD & RIVERWOODS 
MONTESSORI SCHOOLS 

Wm - New ELEMENTARY program 

- Half and Full Day Programs 

- Ages 3 m os. to 8 yrs. 

- Open 7:30 to 6:00 All Year 

PARENT / CHILD PROGRAM AT GLENVIEW SITE 




945-7580 



945-7581 



945-7582 



c 1 



fi 



Little Lamb 

Christian 
Pre-School 



"WE SPECIALIZE IN LOVING CARE" 

SERVING AGES 3-12 

MORNING PRESCHOOL, FULL DAY CARE 

& AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAMS 

|*KINDERGARTEN AND SUMMER PROGRAMS AVAILABLE* 






360-9042 



36448 N. FULLER RD. GURNEE 



^™V?V* \ ' 




WEEK OF THE YOUNG CHILD La^Ianc] Newspapers Apail 19, 1996 



• 



... 



f 



f 

I 

f 
h 



• \ i 
i 

n 

■■■ f 



l 




^ W -J 

eek o 





Kids' Korner protects 
children at courthouse 



Kids' Korner is a waiting room 
for children at the Lake County 
Courthouse in Waukegan. 

Children who 
might otherwise 
be listening to 
violent verbal 
exchanges and 
exposed to unnec- 
essary stress in the 
courthouse can 
enjoy toys and games in 
a nurturing setting in Kids' 
Korner. 

Volunteers staff Kids' Korner 




which provides a safe and fun haven 
for children ages 2 to 12. They are 
open from 8;30 a.m. 
to 12:15 p.m. and 
from 1:15 to 4:30 
p.m., Monday 
through Friday. 
Children can play in 
Kids' Korner while 
parents are attending 
to court businesses. 
For more information or an • 
interest in volunteering, call 
Rosanne Sherwood, director, Kids' 
Korner at (847)360-3691. 



* * 



Chlldrens Waiting Room In 
the Lake County Courthouse! 





• Fun-Riled, Safe and Nurturing Environment for 
Children of Parents Attending to Court Business 

• Adult Supervision and Guidance at 
a Stressful Time In Their Uves 



For. more jnfbrrriah'on or to volunteer, call Rosanne Sherwood, Director 360-3691 




McNulty Irish Dancers 



Barbara McNulty TXJ.R.G* 
(847) 698-4434 

Performances Available 



Lake County Classes 
• Lake Forest • Libertyville • Antioch 



4-&J^£> 



Child Care Learning Center mc. 




REGISTRATIONS NOW BEING ACCEPTED 

Infants thru 5 yr. olds and Full Day Kindergarten 

61 Center Street • Grayslake, IL 548-4FUN (4386) 




J 



i 



LAKE BLUFF 

VILLAGE CHILDREN'S CENTER 

906 Muir Avenue 
295-1455 

Daycare 
Hourly Drop-in 
Before & After School 
Preschool 
Ages 2-12 

The Center is a non-profit organization, licensed by the Slate of Illinois, 
and an Affiliate Agency of the United Way of Suburban Chicago. 
Funding is received from the Lake Forest/Lake Bluff 'United Way. . 

THE CENTER SUPPORTS "WEEK OF THE YOUNG CHILD" 








UnJbadWtU 



9 




it 




J( 9(Wc)e to Hie CkiMten » J4y &fr{e 

I pledge to: 

Listen to children. 

Be a role model for children. 

Spend time with and pay 

attention to children. 

Love and respect children. 

Refuse to stand by in silence 

while 15.7 million 

children live in poverty. 

Educate children in mind, 

body and soul 

Work to provide a stable 

family for the children 

in my life. 

Vote on issues that affect 

children to ensure them 

equal opportunity. Photo by Bryn Benson 

Speak out for children's needs and support organizations 

that help children. 

Reprinted with permission from Lutheran Social Services of Illinois 





K 



jYT\ ¥ 17 Nursery & Day Care 
_JDL)lEi Learning Center 

ORNER 

487- KIDS 



423 W. Liberty SL 
Wauconda, IL 60084 



(847) 



• Aqes 6 wks.- 12 years • Preschool & Kindergarten 

• Open from 6 am - 6 pm M-F • Full & Part time programs 

• Breakfast, catered lunch & snack • Certified teachers 
Activities for all ages 

NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY 
ENROLL NOW 



y HASTINGS LAKE YMCA 

An Environment For Your Child To Grow & Have Fun f*^ 

• Summer Day Camp Begins June 10th - REGISTER H0WI Qj£ s 

• Kindergarten Enrichment • Preschool 

• Before & After school camp • Hours 6:45 a.m.'6:00 p.m. Monday* Friday 




Located off of Grand Ave. & Munn Rd. • Lake Villa 356-4000 



PRIME TIME 2 § 

IE 




Quality Day Care 
at an affordable price 4 

Summer Enrollments Available Oi 



COUNTRY FAIRE PLAZA 

1838 E. BELVIDERE RD. (RTS. 120 & 45) 
GRAYSLAKE.IL 60030 

(847)548-3455 



tee%3VG*C*'GA3VC*C*C2*^ 






*w»r 



! ■■ ■ i u ni m— w i i iwiMB ttaww 













A pail 19, 1996 UIceI/wJ Newspapers WEEK OF THE YOUNG CHILD, 





eek of the 




CHltD 



/- 



~> 



vV 




Tewes House helps teen parents leave welfare 



When kids have kids the conse- 
Iquences are enormous. Many young 
people simply are not equipped to 
[handle the logistics or the emotional 
fctress related to raising children. The 
struggle to finish school, take care of 
jheir babies and support their families 
in become an elusive dream. 



The Lake County Family YMCA 
responded to a call from the Teen 
Parent Initiative at a Child Care 
Coalition of Lake County meeting. At 
the meeting Goodwill Industries of 
Lake County's Teen Parent Initiative 
case manager explained the desperate 
need for Infant/Toddler child care for 






a 



W 



I 



Be a children 's champion 

Today more than ever young chtldren need you to be their champion— some- 
one committed to making the world a more caring place that offers every child 
[and family the opportunity to thrive. 

I promise to do all that I can— at work, at home, and as a con- 
cerned citizen— to make sure that all children and families have the 
wpportunity to thrive. I will 

1. Speak out on behalf of children at every opportunity. 

2. Do something to improve the life of one child beyond my family. 

3. Hold public officials accountable for making children 's well- 
being and learning a national commitment in actions as well as 

words. 

4. Encourage the organizations to which I belong to make a com- 
mitment to children and families. 

J. Urge others to become a Children s Champion. 



Public Aid Teen Parents. A young par- 
ent cannot finish her education, 
receive vocational training or work to 
become self-sufficient if there is no 
one to care for her child. 

September, 1995, The Lake 
County Family YMCA opened Tewes 
House, a new Infant/Toddler Child 
Care Center solely for teenage 
mothers. Through our collaborations 
with Goodwill Industries, Big 
Brothers/Big Sisters, Waukegan 
Township and the College of Lake 
County, we have been able to unite 
our services to assist young parents. 
While Congress debates about how 
to reduce welfare rolls, Lake County 
Family YMCA is helping teen par- 
ents to take charge, get off welfare 



THE GYMNASTICS FACTORY 




888 EAST BRVTDERE SUITE 202 GRAYSLAJCE, IL 60030 
• Great Pre-School Program 
• Boys and Girls Classes 
• Safety Certified Coaches 
• Cheerleading • Birthday Parties • Competitive Team 

REGISTER NOW 
for further information, call 2.23-1555 






»*~t 




STEPPINGSTONE 

MONTESSORI 

SCHOOL 









To 



101 S. BECK ROAD, UNDENHURST 

Register Notvt 



PRE-SCHOOL KINDERGARTEN - AGES 3-6 



Because the MONTESSORI PROGRAM is an individualized learning 
program, children are allowed to enter the school at any time during 
the year. In a fun and relaxed atmosphere your child will learn from 
the following areas: PRACTICAL LIKE, SENSORIAL, MATH, 
LANGUAGE, COMPUTERS, SCIENCE, NATURE, GEOGRAPHY, 
MUSIC, ART, MOyEM^NTAIilD OUTDOOR PLAY. ^ 



:, ART, MOVEMENT AND OUTDOOR PLAY. 

- ■. ' W v 1 - >■ •■.'■■,»"''-•■ ■" ; 



Call now to find out how the Montessori method can ama MAfiA 

have a positive effect on your child's life. . Ciill OflJoHrWCw 

Half-Day prograrnsavMj^le.;) J -;p J ;;>: v " • -^ 1% ' 



nm 



i 



and become self-sufficient. 

Tewes House provides teen par- 
ents with 22 full-time child care slots 
for children ages 6 weeks to 24 
months. The YMCA provides trans- 
portation between home, school and 
child care center. A teen parent may 
earn "Fun Bucks" for attending 
school. "Fun Bucks* are used at the 
' Fun Bucks Store to purchase items for 
the baby or mom. Donations are 
accepted for the Fun Bucks store. Call 
Parent Teen Initiative at (847)360- . 
0853. 

For more information on the Lake 
County Family YMCA's Tewes House, 
call Kay Petersen, director, at 
(847)336-8672.— by GUSSIE 
MONKS, Lake County YMCA 



Helping Children 

Build Better Lives 

Since 1894 



Child 




LAKE COUNTY COMMUNITY SERVICES 

Specializing In: 



FAMILY SUPPORT AND HISPANIC SERVICES 




• Family Home Day Care 

• Information & Referral 

• The SIGA Center 

1 105 Greenwood Ave. 
Waukegan 




• Immigration Support Service 

• Lugar Para Madres 

• Mom's Place 

(847) 263-2200 




CHILDREN 

OUR MOST IMPORTANT RESOURCE 

Full Time and Part Time Programs 
for Children Ages 2-6 



CHRISTIAN 
BEGINNINGS 

824 Waukegan Road 
Deerfield, Illinois 60015 
(847) 945-5140 




Chris nan 
Beginnings 



? THE EATING RIGHT 
PYRAMID 

Milk, Yogurt, 
and Cheese 
Group 



Vegetable 
Group 



Fats, Oils and Sweets 



USE SPARINGLY 




3-5 SERVINGS 



2-4 SERVINGS 








5-11 SERVINGS 



Meat Poultry, Fish, 

Dry Beans, Eggs, 

and Nut Group 



Fruit 
Group 



Bread, 

Cereal, 

Rice, and 

Pasta Group 



\X/ 



'U^ 



Quality Catering = My Child's Food For Thought 
■ Education In Nutrition 
. ' .. ■ Developing Healthy Eating Habits, In Children 
Teaching the. Importance of Vitamins & Minerals in a Child's Diet 

Q U A L I T Y G AT E R I N G I N C J '.you make the decisions on nutrition for your 



:dUAUItY^^Nutri«pri 



* 








" 



*»'*■ i^imt n— < 



.1 - <K *"- " 




I WEEK OF THE YOUNG CHILD IMmil Newspapers Apail 1 9, 1 996 








V 

s 



k of The 




$ 




J 



) 



l 



5 



'* 



«*«?? 





Dave Herzog's Marionettes 

Master puppeteers David Herzog and Susan 
VandeWeghe perform in the cabaret style 
with, short strung marionettes an (J 
puppeteers in full view of the audience, the' 
current production, "In Concert/' features 
the antics of Ted and June, the musical 
lightning bugs; Frankie Monster and his 
creator, the Mad Scientist Boris von 
Puppenspiel; Barbara Strieswan; and the 
aerial artistry of Miss Katrina, the beautiful 
lady on the flying trapeze. The show also 
features, clowns, jugglers and acrobats. 



k ^ 



S& 



/< 



:K* 



w 



' 









Pranita Jain and the Kalapriya Performers 

Pranita Jain and her company perform "Bharat Natyam," a 
highly complicated dance form of India considered one of the 
most graceful kinds of dancing in the world. The company's 
performances are marked by brightly colored costumes, 
rhythmic footwork and graceful hand and body movements. 
Some dances of Kalapriya tell stories that describe east Indian 
mythological gods and goddesses. Pranita Jain has performed at 
the Art Institute of Chicago, the. Harold Washington Library, 
Indiana University, the University of Illinois at Champaign and 
the Museum of Science and Industry. 



Jim Campbell and the Brass Ball Corner Band 

This group of musicians, including an accordionist and guitar * 
players, got together to perform for their own enjoyment and 
now share their music with audiences of all ages. 



We Support Week of the Young Child! 

The Early Learning Center 

Caring for Children Ages 6 Weeks - 6 Years 
(847)360-2733 

S aint Therese Medical Center 

A Division of Franciscan Sisters Health Care Corporation 

2615 Washington Street 
Waukegan, Illinois 60085 






Trinity Lutheran Youth Service 

Little Lambs Preschool 

Now accepting applications for Fall of 1996 

%. Christian atmosphere designed specifically for your 

3, 4& 5 year olds 

• Morning 3 Year Old - 2 Day Program 

• Morning & Afternoons 4 Year Olds - 3 Day Program 

• Pre-Kindergarten (5 yr. old) - 3 Day Program 

and 



;&< 



<fy 



Tftnity Kids Klub 

School Age Children 
Before & After School 6 a.m. - 6 p.m. 




Speak Up, Speak Out,. 
Protecting Our Children 



Our Thanks 

To Volunteer Participants 

And To The Week Of 

The Young Child Sponsors: 



Summer Program Available * How Accepting Applications 



I f&^vrfw. ^ : v , ■ vi. :.■,-,: - • ■ ■"* /-Ev. ^>r;/.^s^«^:-«v-^;t*-Vr J 



For more info, please call 546-1044 
25519 W. Hwy. 134, Ingleside 



- Director's Network of Lake County 

• Far North Chapter Chicago Metro Association For The Education of Young Children 

• Curnee Mills • Scholastic Book Club • Kaplan School Supply Corp 

• Beckley Cardy, Inc. Steve Juracka, Lake County Representative 

• Troll Book Club • Kathryn Beich, Inc. - Amy D'Aquila 

• Trumpet Book Club • Anita Thompson - Artistry 



From: The Child Care Coalition of Lake County and 
The Week of the Young Child Committee, 



-J-*'- 



CHARLENEACKERMAN 

Executive Director, towedy Child Can! Center 
Committee Chairpenai 

SUSAN 10 SAVIO 

Propam Director 
Central Baptist Children* Home 

i 



MARGE COLCLOUGH 

Director 
St. Thense Early Learning Center 

GUSSIE MONKS . 

Executive Director of Child Care 
lake County Family YMCA 



5ANDY GROENINGER 

Coordinator 
College of lake County 

TERRYL RAJCEVICH 

Director 
Windy Toll 



.. — ii ■J»*i.a 



in mmw. i ii l ~ ~i i — ■ i ii i ii 



-, — 



Ap B .M9, 1996 Ubtodtt^pte WEEK OF THE VOUNC CHILD ^jt 



I 



ir 
d 



% i 



K: 



Tne^Week of The 

^ ||\ *t # % *^ 





w 




ducators choose 20 terrific children's toys 

Vhen choosing toys for children music of all types and a variety of art ^W €j Mf* Shape sorters — for fine motor skills 




I When choosing toys for children 
there are several criteria to keep in 
mind. Toys should be appealing and 
iteresting to the child, they should be 
ropriate for the child's physical, 
ital and social developmental stage 
they should be well constructed, 
: ffiable and safe. Above all appropriate 
ioys should support the growth and 
development of the child through play. 

mVhether at home or in child care 
or at school children learn about the 
world around them and how to prob- 
lem solve through play activities. The 
appropriate toys can stimulate a child 
in all types of play which include 
social and fantasy play; exploration 
and mastery play; music, art and 
movement activities, and gross motor 
play. 

■Children from early infancy on 
learn through play. Choosing the 
appropriate toys for the appropriate 
age assists each child in his/her devel- 
opment. 

The following is a list of toys cho- 
sen from Kay-Bee Toys and Toyworks at 
Gurnee Mills. It should be noted that 
this is not an inclusive list. There are 
many more toys that are also appropri- 
ate-foryour child. The list is meant as a 
starting point in thinking through the 
process. 

A large supply of children's books, 



music of all types and a variety of art 
supplies should always be available for 
each child. Art supplies should include 
crayons, markers, scissors, glue and 
different types of papers so that the 
child is able to create her/his interpre- 
tation, not a copy of someone else's. 

In addition to the books, music and 
art supplies, here is a list of 20 terrific 
toys. 
Infant 

Toys should stimulate the senses, 
promote developing awareness, allow 
for exploration and manipulation, 
reward early attempts at mastery and 
be safe. 

Dolls— should be soft and wash- 
able with molded hair and non-remov- 
able eyes 

Musical busy box — teaches manip- 
ulation and mastery 

Baby gym — stimulates senses and 
manipulation skills 

Floatees — stimulate senses and 
manipulation 
Toddlers 

Toys should expand fine and gross 
motor capacities, promote mastery of • 
objects, encourage pretend play, 
increase interest in social play and 
develop early problem solving skills. 

Large blocks — for fine and gross 
motor skills, pretend play, problem 
solving. 



CHILD ^&f 

DEVELOPMENT 

[CENTER 
- _ _. _ 



) 



State-licensed day care 
and preschool 



Big & Little 

Child Development Center 

1200 Regent Drive 
Mundelein, IL 60060 

Laurie A. Gembara 

Director 

(847)566-1988 



• RESALE • CLOTHES • TOYS • EQUIPMENT 



Lake County's Best 

Children's Resale! 

(We Buy & Sell) 

HERE WE GROW AGAIN 

141 n. Seymour. Mundeletn I 



HOURS: 
Tueo, Sat. 10-5 put • Thura^ 10-8 pm 



(New Rogan'a Shoes) 



Grayslake Family EyeCare 



Dr. Brian L. Farquhar 
Optometrist 



Children's Developmental 
Vision Analysis 

Vision Therapy 

Evening & Weekend Hours 

101 Center St (Downtown Grayslake) 






(847) 548-2770 

Featuring Disney Eyewear for children by: jff(2/tCA9ft^ 





|HB 1 


\ 


1 " 1 




tr QlfflffiV-' 


* 'I 

1 1 ' 





Shape sorters develop fine motor and 
blem solving skills. — photo by 

Family Net- 



problem solving s 
CAROL BRUSSLAN at 
work. 



Play phones — teach role play, 
social play 

Puzzles — for fine motor skills, mas- 
tery of objects, problem solving 

Farm animal sound set — for mastery 
of objects, pretend play, social play. 
Two-year-olds 

Toys should fine tune fine motor 
skills, provide active physical play, pro- 
mote independence, expand role-play- 
ing and social play, provide for artistic 
expression and develop problem solv- 
ing skills. 

Play about house — promotes role 
playing, social skills, 



Shape sorters — for fine motor skills, : 
problem solving 

Play food, dishes, grocery cart — 
promote independence, pretend play, 
social interaction 

Puzzles — for fine motor skills, prob- 
lem solving 
Preschool & kindergarten 

Toys should support a wide range of 
interests, growing peer interaction, artis- 
tic expression, effective learning and 
social interaction strategies, develop- 
ment of perceptual and representational 
skills and ways for children to under- 
stand and be effective in the world. 

Mega blocks/Legos 

Puzzles 

Play food, dishes, grocery cart 

Tonka trucks and motor vehicles. 
School age 

Toys should provide for a range of 
abilities and interests, encourage 
respect for individual differences, sup- 
port cooperative learning, nurture a 
growing sense of competency and 
expand curiosity, experimentation and 
problem solving skills. 

Legos 

Doctor kits 

Board games 

K-Nex 
—by MARGE COLCLOUGH, St. 
Therese Early Learning Center, GUSSIE 
MONKS, Lake County YMCA and TER- 
RYL RAJCEVICH, Windy Tots Play 
School and Day Care 



We've planned 
a brand new 
center from 
your child's 
point of view. 



There's a new state-of-the-art 

KinderCare* Learning Center in your 

neighborhood, with 

wonderful programs for 

children of all ages, from infants 

through 12-year-olds. 

We call it Whole Child Development 

It's a nurturing 

environment for your 

child's social, physical, 

KinderCare 

The Whole Child 
is the Whole Idea. 





emotional and intellectual 

development Where qualified 

teachers care about your child 

and build on your 

child care beliefs 

and values. It's not too late 

to enroll your child. 
Call today for more 
information. We look 
forward to meeting you. 



Midlothian Avenue KinderCare 

69S South Route 83 (behind McDonald's) 
Mundelein, II, 

970-9554 

Direct or: Angic Reich 



Enroll today and receive a FREE GIFT! 

Call Center Director, Anjjie Reich, to learn what exciting opportunities 
KinderCare has to offer you and your child. 

We Look Forward to Meeting You! 
• Business Hours are Monday- Friday 6:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. 

■ I"' lu kin iiri ,n I-.ijhiiJ %i\ 



HHBWMMW 



r»^«U«WW* »•.!*,.*..-* ««^4^«S»UWinB% ***.•« **i**«*i»* 




WEEK OF THE YOUNG CHILD IaIci Wd Nr.wspApms Apuil 19, 1 996 



iljgt f f& Week of f JmjVoUKiG CHILD 




LCHD Medical Clinics 



Waukegan 

Belviderc Medical Clinic 

2400 Bclvidcre Rd. 

Waukegan 

360-6517 

Round Lake fork 
Midlakes Medical Clinic 
6 E. Main St. 
Round Lake Kirk 
546-6662 

North Chicago 
10 Street Clinic 
701 10th St. 
North Chicago 
473-4030 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

friday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 



Zion 

1819 27th St. 

Zion 

872-1918 



Deerfield Township 

428 Green Bay, Hjghwood 

El a Township 

95 E. Main, Lake Zurich 

Gran* Township 

4T1 Washington, Ingieside 

lake Villa Township 

310 Milwaukee, Lake Villa 

Shields Township 

201 E. Illinois, Lake Forest 

Warren Township 

' "SOvl Washington, Gurnee 

'/"r.'iriDeerfieid Township 
753 Waukegan Rd., Deerfield 



Monday 
(1st & 3rd 
Mondays only) 
Thursday 

LCHD Mobile Clinics 

1st Tuesday 9 a.m 



9 a.m. - 1\ p.m. 
1 - fl fun. 
9 a.m. - 4 p.m, 
9 a.m. - noon 
a.m. - noon 

Noon - 3 p.m. & 5 - p.m. 

9 a.m. - noon 

9 a.m, - noon A 5 - ft p.m. 

9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

9 a.m. - 3 p.m. 

8 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

9 a.m. - 4 p.m. 
9 a.m. - noon 
9 a.m. - noon 
8 a.m. - noon 

8 a.m. - noon 



8 a.m. - noon 



noon 



4th Monday 9 a.m. - noon 

2nd Wednesday 9 a.m. - noon 



Thursdays 



5-8 p.m. 



1st Wednesday 9 a.m. - noon 



2nd Tuesday 
4th Tuesday 

Fridays 



3rd Tuesday 



9 a.m. - noon 
9 a.m. - noon 

5 - 8 p.m. 



9 a.m. - noon 



The Child Care Coalition 

or Lake County, IL 

Celeijkates 

THE WEEK OF THE 
YOUNG CHILD 



Gurnee Mills 

6170 W. Grand Ave. 

Gurnee, IL 

(tine parking arcn "G" or M II" 
adjacent to JCPcnnoy Outlet) 

Free to the PublicI 




•ur 



Speak Up/Speak Out ... Protecting Our Children 

SUNDAY, April 21, 1996 

12:30 PM - 3:30 PM 

Ongoing Live Entertainment Featuring Children'!* Performers 
Free Community Resource Table . _. 

Q) Brass Hall Corner Band y^SS?*?^ WPT-Ti 

<2>Dnvc Ilcrzog Marionettes 

<2>Kalnr>riyn Performers Dance Troupe 

©Face Painting 

<2>Arts & Crafts Activities 

***** 

l r m More liiloiiunllnii CmilticL Cliarknc Ackcrman ( <■■ <■ 




) 



i 



« 



i i 



QUENTIN ROAD 
CHRISTIAN PRESCHOOL 



Now 
Accepting 

New Applications 

• Ages 3-5 years* 

• Hours 6:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. 

• Hot lunch & snacks 

• Excellent facilities, including 
full size gymnasium 

• Full or half day programs 

• Loving environment 

• Qualified staff 

• Video monitoring 
equipment in 
each classroom 

COST: 

• 5 full days $105.00 

Includes meals & classes 

• 1 full day $24.00 

• 1/2 day $20.25 

with lunch 

• From as little as 
1 day to 5 days, 
we can fit your needs. 



Ask us about 
our^ 

Kindergarien 
Program 




Watch UsOnT.V. 



i 



The Quentin Road Bible Hour 
T.V. 38, Sundays 5:QQ - 6:00 P.M. 



AMimktnfoitheQuemtimBoMd *0 Queatln fld 

Bibu B*pd*t ckmrd «^j 438.4494 uk9 Zmrkkf fl * 0047 

•Waiting lists for some ages » _^___ 



Two great things y 

are coming to Br| h |i " __ 
Lake Villa! Begjm»iff3?* 

The New Train Station children's S 

and 

Bright Beginnings 

Children's Center 



Child Care for Infants 6 
weeks through 6 years 




Full day Kindergarten 

and Day Care 
6:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m 




nmmm wuMW 



CALL NOW FOR SIMMER AND FAIL 
EARLY REGISTRATION DISCOUNT 

847-356-4112 



I 



Located near the new Train Station 
215 N. Milwaukee Avenue • Lake Villa 



y 



I '• 



April 19,1996 "UkfiANd Newspapers GREEN UP I? 





GMEWEE. 





&L 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



Planting trees, shrubs now can create beautiful memories 



i 



■ 

■■ - 



This tree or shrub can be used in 
many applications for the home, 
schools, parks and even along public 
highways. It has many shapes such as 
rounded, horizontal, pendulous, vase- 
shaped and fastigiate. They are valued 
for their flowers, foliage and fruit dis- 
play. It's the crabapple and it shows 
off even in the cold winter months 
with its unique branching. There are 
literally hundreds of types of crabap- 
ples grown in nurseries across North 
America, however, today's or yester- 
day's plants are now rated according 
to disease susceptibility. Men 

such as Dr. Lester Nichols, Dr. Ed 
iHasselkus, Dr. Elton Smith, Dr. 
Malcom Shurtl iff have rated crabap- 
ples for disease suscepti- 
bility by studying 
and collecting 
many years 
£ of data. We 
'thank 
I these 
'men 
reatly 
or their 
efforts. 
We can 
now 
grow 
varieties 
that are 
less suscep- 
tible to dis- 
ease. The 
growers have 
benefited 
greatly from 
these stud- 
ies and 
have been 
able to pass 
this on to the general public. 

This tree or shrub form plant is 
beautiful in full flower. Can be used 
as a single specimen plant or in a 
group. Use different species and cult- 
vars in a group and get longer bloom- 
ing times. Different textures and 
shapes can also be achieved. 

Tired of the usual cotoneaster, 
honeysuckle or forsythia hedge to 
block an unsightly view? Try mixing 
some crabapples with some service- 
berries and enjoy the view, year 
round. 

Many people love the small fruits 
borne in the fall showing berries with 
colors of red, orange, yellow and 
even green. Some crab trees have 




extremely persistent berries that 
remain on the plant all winter. A plus 
for the winter we've had in 1996! 
Some of our favorites are: 
Malus "Adams" 

A carmine buds opens to form a 
pink flower each spring. The persis- 
tent red berry really draws me to this 
plant every winter. Very resistant to 
disease. A rounded, dense growth 
habit achieving heights of 20 to 24- 
feet. 
Malus "Donald Wyman" 

A red to pink bud opens to form a 
single white flower. The fruit is a 
glossy bright red, abundant and 
another persistent berry in winter. 
Large spreading shape 20 to 25-feet 
wide. Shows a nice large 
lustrous green leave 
every summer. 
Malus 

"Prairiefire* 
The red 
buds open 
to show a 
dark pink- 
ish red 
flower. As 
the leaves 
emerge 
they show 
a maroon 
color and 
mature to 
dark green. 
The fruit is 
dark red to 
purple, 
small and 
persistent. 
A slow 
grower 
with a 
rounded growth habit, 20-feet high 
and wide. Very resistant to diseases. 
Some unusual shaped crabs that are 
nice are the Malus "Tina." The pink to 
red bud emerges to form a white 
flower with yellow centers, small red 
berry. A low spreader and is great in 
entry-way, courtyard and viewing gar- 
dens off of decks or patios. Can grow 
to 5-feet in height, highly resistant. 
Have even seen this plant grafted on 
a single stem 24 to 36-inches high. 
Makes a great accent piece for small- 
er gardens. 
Malus "Molton Lava" 

A nice wide-spreading Weeper. It's 
deep red buds emerge to form a sin- 
gle white flower. The berries are a 



MEGA DISCOUNT NURSERY 

Save 50% to 75% 
on Northern Grown Nursery Stock 



Upright Junipers 



White Pine 

s # + $ 24" 
7'+ $ 34" 



Arborvitaes 

Ptffocf for privacy tokening 

3-* $12" *♦ $ 19" 
h $ 24" 



Canadian Hemlock 



6*+ 



Sugar Maple 

A Brilliant red 6 orange In fall color 

7'+ s 39" 
20'+ *129" 



Flowering Crabs 
$7999 



15'+ 



Dwarf Mugo Pine 

A small huggable mound 

S-JQ99 



4' - 7'+ 



$ 



24 



99 



River Birch 

20' $5999 

io' $29" 



Colorado Blue Spruce 

5' S4999 

Dwarf Version, *44" 
very blue In color 



THOUSANDS & THOUSANDS MORE TO CHOOSE FROM. TOO NUMEROUS TO MENTION!!! 
1901 East Rawson Ave., Oak Creek, Wise. 
194 - Exit Rawson Ave. - Go East 2 Miles On Right 

WS" J2J2.«4M) 571-6565 •pESS* 



red-orange color and remain on the 
plant into December. Be sure to use 
a flowering crab in your gardens. As 
it grows it will show off its form, 
flowers, foliage and fruit year after' 
year. Some years the plant will be 
extremely floriferous In the spring 
and reward you with thousands of 



berries to view. The character of the 
plant grows as it matures. Fond 
memories of childhood emerge in 
oneself when In a grove of them. 
Another winner in one's garden. — by 
MIKE GRECO, landscape architect 
and owner of Mill Creek Nursery, 
Wadsworth. 



wm 




n 




Mill 

Creek 

Nursery 




3M 






m 







NOW OPEN 

For the '96 Season 



1,000's of freshly dug: 
•Trees •Shrubs 

• Ornamentals • Evergreens 

All plant material of specimen quality 

$ 25 

Off 

7 All Flowering Crabs 
& Serviceberries 

Professional Landscape Services Since 1979 



Open Fri., Sat., Sun. 8 a.m. - (i p.m. 
40960 Mill Creek Rd. Wadsworth 

(847)838-0501 

nirectioiMoMilUm-KNurH-ry: A\ Norihliilttc. IT.'iiltnsecrsnM 
ftqit u> 1 1 st taivrwtion) Mill ( mi ltd., lift on yrau-l retail 1 12 mite toNurw) Sijjn. 





Oo. 



tt 



© 



rKiS 






RENTAL 
CENTER, INC 

205 E. Rollins Road 
Round Lake Beach 

546-7844 



r © 



SAVE 20 % OFF 
ALL RENTALS* 

April 18 - 21st 

Join us Sunday, April 2 1st for 
. ,' ^ Fun, Food, «L Prizes! 

'chafoU* A- Register to Win: 

Wood S* 1 Fun House Rental 
Sculpture^ 2 Lawn &. Garden Rentals 

- ^ No purchase necessary. 

Your complete rental store 

Local Long Distance DO IT YOU RSELF 

Truck Rental 

RYDER 



BV2I8- 



HEADQUARTERS 



HOURS: Open 7 Days 

Mon-Sat. 7:30 to 530 

Sun. 9 to 2 

'Excluding Truck Rentals 



M^iM H^iWIfm W H MJ W'V P' 



kV^WKM 






*-7 



• - . . 




GREEN UP UbkNd 



M '< 



rs Ap.il 19,1996 






;\ 



s 



< r 




GREEST UP 





Peat moss secret is out: Great gardens begin at root level 



The secret to beautiful gardens is at 
root level— in the soil. So don't covet your 
neighbor's fabulous flowers, stunning 
shrubs, venerable vegetables and luscious 
lawns; build the foundation needed for a 
yard that will rival Eden. 

Plant roots require soil that is loamy, 
neutral, with the capacity for good drainage 
and full of organic material. 

Do a quick quality check to determine 
the condition of your soil. Scoop up a 
handful of dirt and study its texture. If ifs 
thick and lumpy and clings together in a 
ball, ir*s heavy day. Plant roots have a 
hard time penetrating clay, and they will 
starve due to lack of air and water. 

Luckily, one soil amendment will take 
over where Mother Nature, or the devel- 
opers, left off. Canadian Sphagnum Peat 
Moss improves the texture and perfor- 
mance of all soils, both good and bad. It 
will aerate clay, bind sand, dramatically 
reduce the leaching of nutrients and hold 
up to 20 times its weight in water. 

A general rule of thumb is to work a 
two-inch layer into the top six inches of 
soil. For year-round soil conditioning, add 
Canadian Peat Moss to the garden in both 
the spring, before planting, and in the fall, 
after harvesting. 

The pH level of your garden should 
also be analyzed so necessary ad- 
justments can be made. The pH, or level 
of alkalinity or acidity, is measured on a 
scale of 1 to 14. Seven is neutral; num- 
bers above indicate alkaline soil and 
numbers below show acidic conditions. 
Soil amendments and fertilizers may affect 



the acidity or alkalinity of your planting 
bed. Canadian Sphagnum Peat Most is 
again beneficial because it has a pre- 
dictable pH level of 3.4 to 4.8. 

A soil test will help determine accu- 
rately the pH of your soil, but here are 
regional clues that can also be of help. 
Acid soils occur throughout the Northeast 
and in parts of the country that have high 
humidity and other conditions that teach 
out calcium and magnesium. 

Ground limestone is the antidote. 
Aklaline soils are more common in the 
Southwest where rainfall doesn't rob the 
soil of alkalizing chemicals. Spread sulfur 
to increase addity. Remember lawns, veg- 
etables and most flowers prefer a neutral 
to slightly add soil, such as pH 6.0 to 7.0. 

Plants require three major nutrients: 
nitrogen (N), which encourages gnowth of 
plant tissues; phosphorus (P), which stim- 
ulates cell development, fruiting and dis- 
ease resistance, and potassium or potash 
(K), which helps plants form starches and 
sugars as well as resist disease and 
drought. Fertilizers are labeled with three- 
number formulas, such as 5-1 0-1 or 10- 
10-10, referring to the percentage of N-P- 
K within the mix. 

An organic product harvested from 
bogs 7,000 to 1 2,000 years old, sphag- 
num peat moss is found in cold, wet cli- 
mates north of the 45th parallel. Canada, 
the Russian Federation and Germany are 
major producers of sphagnum peat moss. 
Sphagnum moss was one of the first 
plants to grow on land as the glaciers re- 



M-F 8-8 
Sat. 8-6 
Sun. 9-5 



0t4 tf&ut&b <te*t* — 



j3 nursery center 



We Deliver 
7 Days a Week 



SHREDDED OAK MULCH 
$22 Yard - ALWAYS 

Free Village of Antloch Delivery 
(2 yard minimum) 




LARGE SELECTION: 

■ Trees & Shrubs • Perennials 

• Bagged Soils • Decaraltvo Mulch 

• Decorative Stone • Lawn Statuary & GHt Itoms 



Bring in this ad for 
15% OFF Any Purchase! 

(No Ejj>. - Exduda mulch & landscaping unices) 

ONE MILE WEST OF RTE. 59 ON RTE. 173 - ANTIOCH 395-8823 




GIGANTIC SPRING SALE 



Simplicity 



Outdoor Power 
Equipment 



mSSti 



mmrthS 




■ Tight 12" turning 
radius for easy 

mowing around trees 
and landscape 

1 Powerful 8ihp Briggs 
& Stratum I/C engine 

I Electric blade 
engagement 

I Exclusive Ground- 
Hugger" system 
improves traction 

I Exclusive Auto 
Leveller*' delivers 

smooth, even cuts 

I 6.5 bushel grass 

catcher and dump 
cart available 



RILEY'S LAWN EQUIPMENT 



Sales • Service • Parts 



1971 N. Wiley's Rd. Gurnee 

5 miles S. of Wise. Border 

1847) 623-7924 



Serving Lake 

Count/ and 8.H 

i Wisconsin for over 

30 year*. 



Wadsworth 




ceded at the end of the Ice Age. 

Over the centuries, the perennial sphag- 
num plants have grown and formed layers. 
As the layers decompose, the become 
sphagnum peat moss, an enduring fibrous 
substance with large cavities that absorb air 
and water; the way a sponge does. 

Harvesting Canadian Sphagnum Peat 
Moss for horticultural use is an ingenious 
energy^effident process. First, the top 1/2 
inch of the peat bog is raked and left to 
dry in the sun. Once dry, it is picked up 
by large vacuum-like machines. Then, it is 
screened to remove roots and other debris 
and pressed in bales. 

There are other types of peat moss, 
such as those formed from the remains of 
sedge and reed grasses, which are found 
in more temperate climates. These "peats" 
are more highly decomposed than 
Canadian Sphagnum Reat Moss and, 
therefore, do not last as long. Because 
Canadian Peat has a stronger structure 
than other peat products, it has a greater 



capacity to provide plants with the proper 
balance of air and water. 

There is an alternative to pure 
Canadian Peat compost-enriched Cana- 
dian Peat Moss. Vegetable peelings, lawn 
and garden debris and coffee grounds 
needn't waste away in the city dump- 
Mixed in a 50-50 ratio with Canadian 
Peat Moss, compost makes an excellent 
nutrient that also improves the texture of 
the soil. 

Peat will deodorized the compost and 
soak up excess moisture which often col- 
lects in composting receptacles, just add a 
shovelful or two of garden soil or stream- 
sterilized manure as well as two cups of 
limestone and blend the ingredients. 

At a times of increasing concern about 
environmental issues, it is comforting to 
know that this soil conditioner is a com- 
pletely natural resource. A bale of Cana- 
dian Sphagnum Reat Moss is free of insect 
life, weed seeds, and harmful salts and 
chemicals. 




30" 21 



^ 



Corner Hwy. 50 & Hwy. B 

Salem, Wisconsin 53168 

(414) 537-2111 or 

(414) 843-3886 

HOURS: 
M-F 7-6, Sat. 7-5, Sun. 9-4 

consin Border 

1YYARP 

nch Hybrid 

Lilac 

, Pink, or Purple 

*22 

fo-io 

1F $ 6.60 



COMPLETE LANDSCAPE DESIGN 

•SHADt TREES • SHRUBBERY • EVERGREENS 




. 



„____ 



EARLY BIRD SALE 

90 DAYS SAME AS CASH ON TORO UWNMOWERS' 

•Get your Super Roeyclor* mower today, pay for it within 90 days and:£- 
pay no Interest charge. 



: 




MODEL 20443 21" 
RECYCLED MOWER 

• The new Toro Recycler* mower 
you want is now within reach. 

• Toro patented Kickers & 
Accelerators chop clippings 
into fine pieces, giving you a 
clean, healthy lawn. 

• 4.5 hp Toro GTS engine 
guaranteed to start on the 
1st or 2nd pull for 2 years.' 



•Ask dealer for details 

fSee dealer for details on this limited warranty. 




MODEL 20444 21 " 
SELF-PROPELLED RECYCLER 

Suggested retail 
Early Bird Sale 
Mff. Rebate 

FINAL COST 

Mar Rotate 

When you want it done right. 



SUSS: MUYSLAKE H 

.Which Includes Set-Up, 4 III 1 illilal' l>iill!Jfci* 

Service and All Adjustments 1MI11HMM IUUI-1 

• Factory Trained Mechanics > , 

• Authorized Warranty Service Rte. 120 & SiUSSer St. 

• Genuine Toro Parts ■ ;.',.«> 



(JRAYSLAKE FEED SALES 

Outdoor Power ilqiiipimiit 



223-6333 



wnm * 



1 



April 19,1996 UIceIancI Newspapers GREEN UP 



I 



t. 



GREE 



M 





Lakeland 

Newspapers 



ardeners can create a mood with flower colors 



-,•-••;■" 



Everyone likes a bright, colorful gar- 
|n. But did you know that you can cre- 

a mood or even create and illusion 
[change in the garden by using certain 
tlors? 

Red and yellow are colors that com- 
^nd (attention. Our eyes are drawn to 
is and yellows and so are excellent 
)ices to plant in key areas that you 
int people to see. On. the other hand, 
>u have something in your garden 
it you don't want someone to look at, 
int bright yellow flowers opposite the 
sa to draw attention away from there. 
If there afe steps or walkways in your 
ilrden, borders of yellow flowers will 
gltch people's eyes and alert them In an 
Hradive way. Color experts even say 
jrat houses will sell faster if it has yellow 
fofm or borders of yellow flowers out 
front. This is not a guarantee, but may be 
Worth a try if you are in the house sell-, 
ung market. 

I Red can have several effects. Bright 
:red flowers planted at the end of a long, 
narrow property will visually "pull" the 
end in closer and it won't seem so long. 
Red also physically arouses. Studies have 
.'shown that food tastes better around red, 
jrjo red flowers around outdoor eating 
areas will help stimulate conversation 
and make the food taste better too. 
%;' Masses of red or yellow are guaran- 
teed attention getters that won't go un- 
noticed. In a full sun garden consider 
red blooms of petunia, celosla, salvia or 



wax begonia. Yellow is most often found 
in marigolds, but a great deal of interest 
is being paid to dwarf sunflowers such 
as "Sunspot," "Sunrich Orange" and 
"Sunbeam." 

If red and yellow help to excite and 
draw attention, blue is the color we per- 
ceive as being cool and calm. By planti- 
ng lots of blue flowers you can create a 
feeling of coolness even in a full-sun gar- 
den. Lighter blues are better than dark 
blues, Those 95 degree days will just feel 
cooler in a garden with blue flowers. 

Blue tones can help widen or length- 
en the look of a garden because blue 
secedes or falls back. Lots of blue flow- 
ers planted along the sides of a long, 
narrow garden will make it seem wider 
because blue "falls back" visually. 

Because blue is the first color to fade 
from sight as night falls, you may want 
to incorporate light colors into a blue 
border if there are areas you like to look 
at in the evening. Blue tones are found 
in petunias, blue salvia, lisianthus, ager- 
atum and lobelia. 

If you are a very neat, tidy, precise 
person, then white is the color for you. 
Crisp flower beds of white will give your 
garden a well-planned look. Masses of 
white can be hard on the eyes though, 
so you may want to incorporate other 
colors as well. White is also the last 
color to fade as night falls. If evening is 
the only time you nave to enjoy your 
garden because of work schedules, 



r^" 



For fond memories of 
gardens past — plant a pansy. 



Pansies are a symbol for memories and 

souvenirs of time spent joyfully. The smiling face of a pansy 
seems to say, "Happy thoughts of you." For all the wonderful gardens 

and the people 

who have helped 

you grow along the 

way, stop in to 

Leider's Garden 

Greenery and 

select a pansy or 

two. We have ■ 

rich, regal purples, 

cheerful yellows, 

and lovely whites 

ready to grace a 

spot in your 

landscape. 

Remember some 

happy thoughts of 

yesteryear, and 
plant some pansies. 

•Accord Yellow Blotch' Hybrid Pansy ■ 

New Summer Hours Starting April 22: Blooming soon at Leider's: 
Mon.-Fri, 9a.iti.-8p.m.; Sal 4 Sun,, 9a.m.-5p.m. j^ nn ua j s 





Leiders 



GARDEN GREENERY INC. 

Located in Grayslake on the corner of 
Rte. 83 and Lake Street 

(847) 223-2422 



HOURS: 

Mon.-Fri., 
9 a.m. to 6 p.m.- 

Sat. &. Sun., 
9a.m.to5p.m. 



white flowers are a good choice because 
they can be seen and enjoyed as dark- 
ness falls. Annuals that deliver good 
white blooms include petunia, vinca, 
nicottana, alyssum and impatiens. 

Green is a good compliment to 
white because it actually helps your eyes 
recover from the strain of bright white. 

What if your taste runs toward lots of 



different colors? Thafs great! Just don't 
over do it Mixed colors add a festive 
touch. But too much mixing can be 
more disorganized than festive. For a 
limited but festive look, a marigold mix- 
ture can display the four colors of yel- 
low, orange, gold and maroon. Also, 
using three or four colors over and over 
can nelp tie everything together. 




EQUIPMENT COMPANY 

ital 






QUICK CHANGE 



,>-.", ..-..:: .: 



:■;.. -,;;£,,;.. ,: :..:.:,,.,,:-■:',: -.-:■. ''''■'■•''■■•■ 



Kubota B-Series TVactors 



• More powerful, efficient, 
versatile than larger tractors 

• Quick-attach implements 

• 2 speed rear PTO 

3 way hydraulic control 
3 point hitch 



• Scrap, plow, haul, till, 
mow with ease 

• Fuel efficient, liquid cooled 
•12.5 -24 HP class 

performance standard setter 



OPTIONS: 

Power steering 
HS transmission 
Bi-spced turn 
Cruise control 



LOW FINANCING 
RATES AVAILABLE 



27939 W. Concrete Drive 

(Behind Fischer Broi. Concrete) " 
Lets than 1/4 mi. from 12 & 59 

INGLESIDE 
(815) 363-4100 




2216 N. Green Bay Rd. 

(Sunset &. Green B«y) 

WAUKEGAN 

(847) 336-1205 




Do It Right 
The First Time... 

CALL THELEN 



• Ready Mix Concrete 


• Parking Lots 


• Driveways 


• Sand Gravel 


•Patios 


• Garage Floors 


• Retaining Walls 


• Concrete Stamping 



»-> 



Experience In Business 

thelen Since 1948 wilmot 



28955 W. RTE. 173 ANTIOCH, IL 

(847) 395-3313 
(815)675-6613 



COUNTY HWY. "C" WILMOT, Wl 

(414) 862-2324 
(800) 537-2324 



fcJe&f 




- ■- -■ -----i - '-■ , ,r'f-- — >A^rv ■■-■ r, - *»w^ 



~^ti 



..... 




IAKEL1FE WdANd Newspapers Ap«il 19,1 996 




'S HUNAN I 

Chinese Restaurant & Lounge 






SERVING LUNCH & DINNER 



LUNCH BUFFET 

Monday thru Friday 

(Lakchurst Location Only) 



100 N. Milwaukee Ave. 

LlbertyvillCflL 

847-816-6988 



OPEN 7 

DAYS A 

WEEK 



Carry Out Specialists 



#2 . 
911 Lakchurst Road, 

OuUlrf« Ukdiunt Mill 

Waukegan, IL 
847/473-1660 



Eating and meeting 
in the Lakeland area 




< \\\w 



■C*a3yrfai$£ readers ®M%% 



Get a 

$ 25 Dining Certificate! 

See Lakeland's 

WHEEL DEALS Section 

for details. jjjfc 




'i 



TUESDAYS 

CompUu PRIME RIB 



Dinner 



$ 




8.95 




-f* Capt. Guido's 

Vi^ Casual Fine Dining 

476 Liberty St. (Rte. 176) Wauconda 
526-0606 

Daily Specials: 

Prime Rib AIMJ-Can-Eat $13.95 

Bed Snapper or Orange Roughy Topped with 
Crab Meat & a Spicy DeJonghe Topping $13.95 

Batter Dipped Cod $9.95 

SUNDAYS 
CRAB LEGS (A-U-Can-Eat) $15.95 



PLAN YOUR GRADUATION PARTIES; SHOWERS, REHEARSAL 
DINNERS OR ANY SPECIAL OCCASION IN OUR PRIVATE ROOM. 

Special Banquet Prices: $12.95 per person ♦ Buffet Price: $8.95 per person 




AND FRIGATE LOUNOE 
ON LONQ LAKE 



Attention 

SENIORS! 



Friday Night - Greg Rockingham Trio 



u 




NORTH 5WHDANR0AD 



FINE DINING ft SPIRITS 

662-6090 



WAUKEGAN 



OUR POPULAR SENIOR SPECIALS 

Are Now Being Served Monday thru Thursday 
YOUR CHOICE OF 6 ENTREES 



Includes: 
Soup, Salad Bar, Potato, Vegetable, Beverage 

Which can be alcoholic or non-alcoholic & deiiert from our pastry table 

Only $ 6.50 Complete* 



Located On Rollins Rd. F Ingleside 
Overlooking Beautiful Long Lake 



847-587-3211 



V 




CHECK OUT 

OUR ALL NEW 

MENU 



• Kids Menu 
• Pasto - Pasta - Pasta 
• Extended Sandwich Menu 

Pitts All Your Favorites 



FRIDAY 
FISH FRY 

$7*95 



SUNDAY FAMILY 
STYLE DINNERS 

Served 1-8 p.m. 
All You Can Eat 

Adults $8.95 

$3.95 Under 10 



On Rtc, 120 - 2 1/2 miles 
West of Rtc. 12 on Lily Lake 



just 10 minutes west of Grayslake 



(815) 385-9869 



C/dcbrate 

at Terry's 

Friday & Sond/ty 
MAy 7rcI & 4Th 

WATch For Ovr 



Voted #1 

3 yrs. . 

In a row! 



££) i JIWco'q 

Trattoria dl donapontt 



Opening-for Lunch in 

Lake Zurich 

April 23 rd 

Enjoy Anlioc h Too... 



Ciftc© fi£ Ma^© 

Specials iNcludiNq 

• Cabrlto (Baby Goat) 'I3 05 
. Conejo (fcabbtt) H3 05 

UO05 

• Barbacoa ic 

• Monudo ^J 

(Rtq. menu avaIIaMe) 

HOURS: 

MOH-FRI11AM-10PM 

SATURDAY 4 PU- 10 PH 

• CLOSED SUNDAY 



FftidAy A SATVRdAy D'inmr 

• ChipoTU Roasteu Duck 
» Roaste(I Ponk 

• RoASTEd BeeF TENdERloiN 

That Emms Air 

Rally DiUchvf! 



! ■ ' 



liv ■ 

b 



883 Main St. 

Antioch. IL 

(847) 395-8883 



235 Rand Rd. 
Lake Zurich. IL 
(847) 540-1300 



TERRY'C 

1 MEXICAN V 
RESTAURANT & BAR 

125 N. SEYMOUR • MUNDELEIN, IL 

' ;- (IN TfJE HAWLEV COMMOftS) 



PRIVATE ROOM 
AVAILABLE! 

• No SwokiNq Area 
» HAMdicAppcd Accessible 



CARRY-Ol 

566*9530 

FAXS4*-fSfO 



BAKERIES 



SOMETHINGS BREWING, 36 S. 

Whitney Street, Dowtown 
Grayslake, 548-4600. Fresh 
baked pastries, all occasion deco- 
rated cakes, handmade choco- 
lates, espresso/coffee bar, bulk 
beans, gourmet sandwiches, 
homemade salads, soups, hand 
sliced deli meat and cheeses. 
Gift baskets, gift certificates. 
Somethings Brewing is open 
Monday through Saturday from 
5:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Sunday 
from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. $. , rmjjj'« 



CHINESE 



VAN'S HUNAN INN I & II, 100 

N. Milwaukee (Libertyville) 816- 
6988, and 91 1 Lakehurst Road 
(Waukegan) 473-1 660. Casual 
Chinese dining and lounge. Open 
7 days a week serving lunch and 
dinner. All you can eat lunch buf- 
fet at Lakehurst location Monday 
through Friday. Open Sunday 
through Thursday, 11 a.m. to 10 
p.m.; Friday and Saturday 1 1 a.m. 
to 1 1 p.m. $$5 



DEEP DISH PIZZA 



THE SILO, 625 Rockland Road, 
Lake Bluff, 234-6660. Casual 
dining in a unique atmosphere. 
Deep dish pizza, steaks, ribs, 
burgers, shrimp, soups, salads, 
and more. Reservations for 6 
or more, children's menu, ban- 
quet facilities for 20 to 100 
people. Open Monday through 
Thursday, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; 
Friday and Saturday, 1 1 a.m. to 
12 a.m.; Sunday, 4 to 10 p.m. 
$$ 



FINE DINING 



MERS RESTAURANT, 313 E. 

Liberty, Wauconda, 526-6905. 
Family owned, fine dining over- 
looking Bangs Lake. Celebrating 
38lh anniversary. Daily specials at 
reasonable prices. Sunday brunch 
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Catering 
and banquet facilities available. 
Open for lunch Mon. through Sal. 
1 1:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.; dinner 
4:30 to 10 p.m.; Sundays from 10 
a.m. to 9 p.m. Closed Tuesdays. 
$$$ 

STONEGATE TAVERN & GRILL, 

500 Ela Road, Lake Zurich, 438- 
4900. Stonegate Tavern & Grill is 
all new - with new management, 
chef and enticing menu. Dine in 
an Olde English atmosphere next to 
a magnificent open hearth. Try 
steaks, seafood, chicken, ribs and 
more prepared in Stonegale's own 
special way. American cuisine at 
it's finest. Open Monday through 
Thursday from 1 1 a.m. to 10 p.m.; 
Friday and Saturday from 1 1 a.m. to 
11 p.m.; and Sunday from 4 to 9 
p.m . $$$ 



ITALIAN 



Dl MARCO'S Trattoria di 
donaponti, 883 Main Street, 
Antioch, 395-8083. Rated 3 1/2 
stars. Great italian cuisine, now 
available in two locations: 
Antioch and Lake Zurich, starting 
March 20. Carry-outs available. 
Banquets or business meetings up 
to 150 people. DiMarco's is 
open Tuesday through Saturday at 
5 p.m;; Sundays at 4 p.m., and 
closed Mondays. $$$. 






April 19,1996 UkfUNd NewspApERS IAKEUFE F 





\EFRONT DINING 



JpNT SHORES, 
Boking Fox Lake, 587-1900. 
Rtfc southern cooking and 
Style burgers and fries. Large 
■wont deck with sealing for 75 
.ids and 65 Inside. Famous 
iday fish fry. Open 4 to 1 1 p.m. 
tcsday through Sunday. $$ 

UGATE, On Rollins Road, 
ctween Fairfield and Wilson 
Road, 507-3211. Same location 
(or 48 years. Complete marina 
IfjUes. Sunday Champagne 
TOpi/ 10 acres of resort property 
Booking Long Lake. 
S : cfalizing in steaks and Italian. 
Banquets and weddings. $$ 

ti&E STREET INN, 906 Diamond 
! ; IRoad, Mundeleln, 566-1090. 
Located on beautiful Diamond 
, ake in Mundeleln, Gale Street 
"iji'n offers a fine reputation for 
ra, spirits, and hospitality, 
jfcing and entertainment is in 
thffiounge five nights a week, 
Tuesday through Saturday. Open 
fc Hunch Tuesday through 
2 JBrday, 11 to 3; dinner 3 to 10 
Hm. weekdays; Friday and 
Saturday 3 p.m. to 12 a.m.; 
Sunday 3 to 10 p.m. $$$ 



MEXICAN 



RYS MEXICAN RESTAU- 
|ANT, 325 N. Seymour, 

undelein, 566-9530. Terry's 
Mexican Restaurant offers the best 
in Mexican food and American 
cuisine sure to delight any palate. 
From delicious margaritas to 
seafood and more, you're sure to 
come back to Terry's. Open 
Monday through Friday 1 1 a.m. to 
10 p.m.; Saturday noon to 10 p.m. 
Closed Sunday. $$$ 



MICRO-BREWERY 



BREWM ASTERS PUB & RESTAU- 
RANT, 4017 80th Street, Kenosha, 
Wl, (414) 694-9050. A casual, 
friendly atmosphere where even 
the beer is homemade. Lunch 
and dinner served daily. Open 
daily at 1 1 a.m., with average 
lunch prices $4.25 and dinners, 
$9. Open daily at 1 1 a.m. for 
lunch. $ - $$$ 



SEAFOOD 



CAPTAIN GUIDCfS, 476 Liberty 
Street, (Liberty Plaza), Wauconda, 
526-0606. Casual fine dining, 
great atmosphere. Specializing in 
seafood and pasta combinations, 
prime rib, steaks, veal and chicken. 
Private party room available. Open 
1 1 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through 
Friday; 4:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. 
Saturday; 12 noon to 9 p.m. 
Sunday. $ - $$$ 



ADVERTISEMENT 




Madison Avenue 



Location: 

34 N. Sheridan Road 
Waukegan 

Telephone: 

(847) 662-6090 

Hours: 

Monday through 
Friday, 1 1 a.m. to 4 
p.m for lunch, Monday 
through Thursday from 
from 4 to 1 p.m. for 
dinner, Friday and 
Saturday from 4 to 1 1 
p.m. for dinner, and 
Sunday from 4 to 1 
p.m. 

Menu: 

American cuisine- 
steak, chicken, ribs, 
fresh fish, prime rib, 
escargot, house spe- 
cialty Baked Oysters 
Madison 




restaurant features American cuisine with dishes 
such as chicken, ribs, a variety of steaks, fresh fish, 
and one of the most selected entrees, prime rib. On 
Tuesday night, prime rib is offered for only $8.95, 
regularly $13.95, with your choice of soup or 
salad. With entrees chosen from the menu, you get 
soup or juice, salad, a hot loaf of bread, and your 
choice of potato. 

You can start your meal with a number of tasty 
appetizers, including escargot (which gets rave 
reviews), BBQ ribs, crab caps (mushroom caps 
stuffed with crab), fresh veggie or fruit platters, 
shrimp cocktail, raw oysters, and Madison 
Avenue's house recipe, baked Oysters Madison. If 
you have room, try the excellent carrot cake or 
cheesecake for dessert. 

At Madison Avenue you'll find a variety of fea- 
tured items on the menu every day. The Greg 
AAadlSOn AVGnUe features Rockingham Trio is appearing in the lounge on 
^«~.i- «^_«A, ^^^4- tfWt-t^J Tuesday and Friday, with J. D. Smith playing on 

great view, great food Sa(urd / y nights . 

Waukegan's Madison Avenue is well-known for Experience Madison Avenue for yourself! It's 

its fine dining and elegant setting which includes located in Waukegan at 34 N. Sheridan Rd., 

a wonderful view of Lake Michigan from the floor (847)662-6090, open Monday through Friday from 

to ceiling windows in the main dining room. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. for lunch, Monday through 

Madison Avenue sits on a bluff overlooking Thursday from 4 to 1 p.m. for dinner, Friday and 

Waukegan Harbor. Saturday from 4 to 1 1 p.m. for dinner, and Sunday 

The restaurant features two candlelit dining from 4 to 10 p.m. 

rooms with three levels of dining and seating for up For customer convenience, the City Parking 

to 1 10 as well as a newly redecorated meeting and Garage, where public parking is permitted, is just 

banquet facility with seating for up to 1 50. adjacent to the south side of the restaurant. Parking 

Madison Avenue is family-owned and operated is 50 cents an hour on weekdays. Parking in the 

by Marilyn Eccles and her sons, Kevin and Kit. The garage is free after 6 p.m. and on weekends. 




bURCiERii 



Bring In This Ad For 

I!50 % OFFi 






TOTAL FOOD ORDER 

$5.00 MAXIMUM 

Expires 5/6/96 

[ Not Valid with any other offer. J 



CHICAGO 

STYLE 
PAN PIZZA 



■ 




625 ROCKLAND RD. (RL 176) 
LAKE BLUFF 

847-234-6660 

M«i.»Thm. 11 i.nu-10 pun. 

Frl/Sat 11 «.m.-1 1 pjn. 

Sun. 4-10 p. m. 



SANOVVICHHK 



STEAK HOUSE 



BACKYARD STEAK PIT, 1818 
Grandwood Drive, Gurnee, 356- 
5200. Steak dinners start at $8.95. 
Family casual dining where you can 
watch the chef cook your meal. 32 
oz. porterhouse or sirloin, also chick- 
en, prime rib, lobster tails; shrimp, 
fish, pork chops, children's menu 
available. Open at 4:00 p.m. $$$ 



HOT SPOTS is a paid 

advertisement and is provided as a 

service to our readers. 

Restaurants arc listed according to the 

type of food served. 

AVERAGE PRICE PER MEAL 

$ Up to $4 

$$ 45 to $8 

$$$ .$9 to $14 

$$$$ $15&Up 



Wauconda author Ritchie tells tale of 
South American Indian tribe in new book 



SPENCER SCHEIN 



Staff Reporter 

What would it be like to visit another world where 
the natives believe in the word of spirits, refuse to talk 
about the dead and would kill another to avenge a 
death? 

Mark Andrew Ritchie of Wauconda has done this, 
and has written a book about the life and times of the 
Yanomamo, an Indian tribe that lives in a region in 
South American in Venezuela and Brazil. 

Ritchie visited the Yanomamti almost religiously 
over a 14-year period, first going with a friend in 1983, 
and then returning on his own or with his family every 
year or a couple in-between) i < •'■>* tM 

"Spirit of the Rainforest tells i the history of the 

.Ui ilj Or : Oi y>'f '-^ ■ 



Yanomamo from the 1950s through the present, and 
Is told through the eyes of Jungleman, a shaman 
Ritchie met in 1990. 

All of the stories and talcs In the book arc true, 
even though some readers may find them too unbe- 
lievable. 

Before hitting the road on a book tour and a stop at 
CNN Atlanta, Ritchie will hold a premier book release 
in the library of Wauconda High School, 555 N. Main 
St, at 7 p.m. April 22. Ritchie will be accompanied by 
Gary Dawson, an American raised in the jungle who 
acted as a liaison and translator for Ritchie, and Chief 
Shoefoot, one of the central characters in the book. 
. Wauconda High School is located about one mile' L \ 



FAIRMONT SHORES 

•RESTAURANT &. LOUNGE 

587-1900 

<o?«£ haven £ ukxt/ lec 

youiM facet/ otm.. 

•Jimmy Burgers 

•Blackened Chicken Sandwich 

•Chicken Wings 

•Carolina Burgers 

•Cajun Fries 

•THE BEST RIBS 

•MuchMorell 




Me Route 59 to Bald Eagle Rd 
(Between Monavillc & Grand Ave.) 
to Lakeshorc Dr. -right to deadend. 



•■'_■. Good Mod. 
Opro Tse*., 'Wc4. A. Ttein 

firi,SiL4SBD. 

UllJOun. 

Kifci» Open SLASH. 

« nadnl jht 





GdUSffiETP 

Diamond Lake 

Sun., 
May 12th 

Mother's 
Day 

Celebrate 
With Mom 

On Her 
Special Day 

Mother's Day 
Specials 

Seniaj htm 11 u. - J tm « Itsentlou 

LUNCH & DINNER 

Party and Banquet FadUtks (20-200) 

Show Lounge - Dancing 
fEATUUNG - "CHANCE" 

906 Diamond Lake Rd., 
Mundelein 

566-1090 

An Affordable Restaurant 




north of Route 176. 



Iff: 



'li 



ar» n 



■ i vi.n^iij \ n'iitii 



SUBSCRIBE TODAY! 



.*4_l"-i 



»3 1 — ■•• 




q J 2 Lakeland 



> 4 



u il .; ^N ewspapers In £ £.' 



-*M %*.*-<— -', ti.y , 



->; 






Local performers needed for talent show 

The talent search is on again for family style talent! 

Magic City and I.C.U. Productions arc gearing up for the April 26 
Talent Show at Magic City, 3400 Grand Ave., Gumce. Individuals who 
sing, dance or play a musical instrument should call Ursula for an 
audition; 249-9100, ext 111. Auditions arc held every Wednesday and 
Friday from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. and must be scheduled. Special times can 
be arranged, but call first 

Performers of all ages are welcome. First, second and third prizes 
will be awarded. First prize is a $150 prize package. Winners will chal- 
lenge other winners for the finals. Every monthly talent show' is. an 
excitLpgi'eVehLAU participants get a prize. 

Magic Gity and ■ I.ClUl Productions have a mutual goal to help local 
artists gain .recognition and achieve their dreams, limited perfor- 
mances accepted . First come, first. served. 






' 



■ 





LAKELIFE UblANd Newspapers April 19; 19 96 



1 



t 




F. Y. I . 










"Dough Cookie' 

The musical "One Tough 
Cookie" will be presented at 
Apple Tree Theatre, 595 Elm 
PI., Highland Park, through 
April 21. Performances are 
held Tuesdays, Wednesdays 
and Thursdays at 7:30 p.m.; 
Fridays at 8 p.m.; Saturdays 
at 5 and 9 p.m.; and Sundays 
at 3 p.m. Tickets arc $25 and 
$28 with senior and student 
discounts available. For reserva- 
tions or further details, call 432- 
4335. 

'Romeo and Juliet* 

"Romeo and Juliet" will be per- 
formed by the University of 
Wisconsin-Parkside's Theatre DcpL 
April 19, 20, 26 and 27. The play will 
• be performed at 7:30 p.m. in the 
Communication Arts Theatre. Ad- 
mission is $7 for adults and $3 for 
senior citizens. Call (414)595-2564 for 
tickets. 

Stage Two presents... 

"The Incredible Undersea Trial 
of Joseph P. Lawnboy," an environ- 
mental musical comedy for all ages, 
will be performed by Stage Two, 410 
Sheridan Rd., Highwood, through 
April 21. Performance times are 
Saturdays at 10 a.m., 1 and 7 p.m., 
and Sundays at 3 p.m. Tickets are 
$5 adults, $4 for students and 
senior. Adult chapcroncs arc free 
with groups of five or more. For fur- 
ther details or reservations call 432- 
7469. 

One-act plays 

The Lake Forest College Garrick 
Players theatre group will present 
Playwrights-In-Progress XV April 18 
to 20. The annual staged readings of 
scenes and one-act plays are written 
by Lake Forest College student play- 
wrights. Performances are held at 
the Allan Carr Theatre, 8 p.m. night- 
ly, with a 2 p.m. Saturday matinee. 
There is a $5 general admission 
charge, $2 for senior citizens and 
non-LFC students. For ticket infor- 
mation and reservations call 735- 
5210. 

'Bleacher Bums' 

Waukcgan Community Players 
present "Bleacher Bums," a play 
about die-hard Cubs fans in the 
bleachers at Wrigley Field, at the 
Mclba WixomTheatrc, Glen Rock and 
Jackson Streets, Waukcgan. Perfor- 
mance limes are 8 p.m. on April 19, 
20, 26 and 27 with a 3 p.m. matinee on 
April 20. Call 244-0842 for more 
details. 

CLC theater 

"She Stoops to Conquer," the 

spring production of the College of 

Lake County theatre department, will 

be presented at 8 p.m. April 19, 20, 

25, 26 and 27. The play combines 

comedy and suspense a s a young 

man tries to courthis father's friend's 

daughter. Tickets are $7 general 

admission and $5 for CLC students 

and alumni. Call 223-6601, ext. 2300 

for tickets. 

'The New Yorkers' 

The long-lost Cole Porter gem, 
"The New Yorkers," will be presented 
at Marriott's Lincolnshire Theater, 
10 Marriott Dr., Lincolnshire, 
through June 9. Performances are 
Wednes-days at 2 and 8 p.m.; 
Thursdays and Fridays at B p.m.; 
Saturdays at 5:30 and 9 p.m.; and 
Sundays at 2:30 and 7 p.m. Tickets to 
all performances arc $33. Senior citi- 
zens and students receive $10 off on 
Wednesdays' shows and Sunday 
matinees. Make reservations by call- 
ing 634-0200. 

Drama camp 

The David Adler Cultural Center Is 
hosting a Drama Camp for children 
beginning June 18. The camp offers 
all the excitement and magic of the 
stage for eight weeks, culminating in 
a production of the play "You're a 
Good Man, Charlie Brown." Camp 
meets from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday 
through Wednesday. For information 
call 367-0707. 

Auditions 

Local auditions for Barat College's 
.Shakespeare on the Green's produc- 
tion of "Romeo and Juliet" will be 
held April 25 from 6 to 10 p.m. 
Prepare a one to two minute classical 
monologue. All roles are open. There 
is pay. Call 295-2620 for more infor- 
mation and, an appointment 



Love Birds' 

Raffaclli's in Llbertyville 
presents "The Love Birds" 
with cabaret singer Ruth 
Nathan Anderson and piano 
stylist T. Will Fcjcr on April 19 
and 20 at 9 p.m. For more 
Information call 367-808B. 

Season finale 

The Waukcgan Symphony 
Orchestra and Concert Cho- 
rus will present their final concert of 
the season on April 20 at Waukegan 
High School at 7 p.m. Joining in the 




concert will be members of Bel Canto 
Chorus and the Project Create 
Children's Choir, both from Milwau- 
kee. Tickets arc $12 for adults, $10 for 
seniors, students and military person- 
nel, and $6 for children 12 and under. 
Call 360-4742 for further details. 

Folk concert 

Skip Gorman plays music from the 
old west on April 20 at 8 p.m. at the 
David Adler Cultural Center, 1700 N. 
Milwaukee Ave, Llbertyville. Tickets 
arc $9 for adults, $6 for members, 
seniors and children under 16. Call 



367-0707 for reservations. 

Freddy Mills orchestra 

The sounds of the Big Band era 
will return to the College of Lake 
County as the Freddy Mills Orchestra 
performs at 8 p.m. April 20 In the 
Brandel Court at the Grayslakc cam- 
pus. Tickets are $5 general admission 
and $3 for CLC students and alumni. 
Tickets are available by catling 223- 
6601, ext. 2300 or stop by C-101. 

April conceit 

The North Suburban Symphony 



with violin soloist Caroline Chin, 1995 
competition winner, will present an 
April Concert on April 21 at 4 p.m. at 
the Gorton Community Center, 400 E 
Illinois Rd., Lake Forest Tickets arc 
$10 for adults, $7 for students and 
seniors. Call 926-8554 for further 
information. 

Vermeer Quartet 

The Lake Forest Lyrlca Scries will 
conclude its second season on April 
21 with a performance by the 
Vermeer Quartet, an Internationally 
See FY1 page B17 







S1TURDAY, APRIL 20 
40 AM TO 6PM ' 




Hreexoffee and Minibons ■ Center Court 









furnished by Cinnabon, Lakehurst Mall 
; fginning 10am while supplies last 



m 



J 10% REBATE I 

Bring all Lakehurst Store receipts; dated April 20, 1996 only,! 

totaling $100 or more to the Information Center and receive a 

1 0% rebate of your total purchases!* I 






Historical photo display from the mall's archives. 
See Lakehurst Then & Now! 

''Show Biz Kidz" perform on Center Stage 
1 pmjpnd 3pm 



m 
m 



m 



:;.;,:.,■■? 






Rts,1 20 & 43 Vtake County, IL» 847-473-0234 

Open Monday • Friday 1 Oam to 9pm 
Saturday 1 Oam to 6pm • Sunday. 1 1 am to 6pm . 



Some rules apply. See Information Center for details. 






,^.rj.v;.;, .:-. ...j niyivrfniirrai i r w i«*< 



GHXHaOL 



^^^^— 






. 



J 



Apnil 19,1996 LaIceUncJ Newspapers LAKE LIFE 




: lV page B16 
IfiOWncd chamber music ensemble. 
■j c 3 p.m. concert will take place In 
Forest College's Lily Reid Holt 
nOrlal Chapel, located on the cor- 
ffi College and Sheridan Roads. 
R arc $15 for adults, $5 For noh- 
Students, and arc available at the 
; ; ... For more details call 735-5 1G9. 

tee spring conceit 

Lake Forest College's Chamber 
fiatra and Chorus will present a 

fw.) spring concert on April 23 at 7:30 
l at the Lily Reid Holt Memorial 

Chapel on the comer of College and 

Sheridan Roads. 



Mtaslc workshops 

iSomc of the best folk music Inslru- 
rtsnialists In Lake County will be 
j$ng;spcctal one-time only work- 
is 'at the Adler House In 
•rtyvillc. Beginning students and 
-players can register to simply lis- 
land soak up the experience, 
sourl Fiddling with Charlie 
sum* Waldcn will be held April 20. 
meets from 2 to 5 p.m. and costs 
%M On April 23, explore Irish Fiddling 
Hi Liz Carroll (National Heritage 
iHowshlp winner). On April 30, James 
Kfcher of Rollln" & Tumblin' will teach 
Rro to Country Blues Guitar. 
■Kukshops meet from 7 to 9 p.m. and 
Jbt $25. Call 3G7-0707 for further 
■tails and complete schedule. 



=CIe 






L 



d 

■.•:,s 



Classical concert 

[ The School Voyageurs, a 60-plece 
Igh school orchestra from Etoblcoke 
ehool of Arts In Toronto, Ontario, 
111 perform a classical concert at 
lawthorn Lakes Retirement Com- 
uinity, 10 E. Hawthorn Pkwy., 

/ernon Hills, on April 23 at 1 p.m. For 
lore Information call Kathy Morris at 

167-2516. 

['A Capella Program* 

Under the direction of Alan 
Hcathcrlngton, The New Oratorio 
Singers spring concert, "A Capella 
Program," will be performed at 7:30 
p.m. on April 26 at St. Francis dc Sales 
Church in Lake Zurich. Call 604-1067 
for further details. 

Family concert 

A family concert of the Chicago 
Symphony Orchestra offered in coop- 
eration with the McHenry County 
Youth Orchestras Community Arts 
Center Is being held on April 27 at 
Orchestra Hall. Featured is Fred 
Penner. Tickets are $33 and arc avail- 
able by mall or at the MCYO-CAC 
office, 64 E. Crystal Lake Ave., Crystal 
Lake, IL 60014-6137. Cost Includes 
round trip transportation. Call 
(815)356-6296 for more Information. 

'In an English Garden* 

The New Oratorio Singers present 
"In an English Garden," the theme for 
the third annual TNOS benefit which 
will be held at 4:30 p.m. on May 5 at 
the Barrington Hills Country Club. 
Benefit tickets are $50 ($20 tax 
deductible). Reservations arc due by 
April 23; mail to TNOS, P.O. Box 1503, 
Barrington, IL 60011. 

Stay Tooned 

Stay Tooned Gallery pre- 
sents its "Cabin Fever" Vintage 
Disney Art Exhibit, which will 
feature over 100 onc-of-a-kind 
artworks from virtually every 
Disney feature film, at the 
Arcade, 272 E. Deerpath, Lake 



m 



Forest The exhibit runs through April 
30. The largest collection of animated 
dinosaurs has Invaded Barrington for a 
month-long exhibit entitled "The Art 
of The Land Before Time." The exhibit 
will run through April 30 at the Stay 
Tooned Animation Gallery, 220 S. 
Cook St., Barrington. 

furled art exhibit 

The 15th annual College of Lake 
County Juried student art exhibit is 
being held in the Community Gallery 
of Art at CLC, 19351 W. Washington 
SL, through May 19. Gallery hours arc 
S a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through 
Thursday; 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Friday; 9 
a.m. to 430 p.m. Saturday; and 1 to 5 
p.m. Sunday. Call Steve Jones at 223- 
6601, cxl 2240 for more Information. 

Senior projects 

Lake Forest College will host an 
opening reception on April 18 for the 
exhibit entitled "Senior Projects In 
Studio Art." The 7:30 p.m. showing 
will take place in the Sonncnschein 
Gallery of the Durand Institute. The 
exhibit will be open through April 28 
from 230 to 5 p.m. dally. Call 735- 
6010 for further details. 






Square dance 

The Lake Promenaders 
Square Dance Club Is hosting 
a dance on April 20 at Oak 
Grove School, 1700 S. O'Plalne 
Rd., Llbertyvillc, at 7:45 p.m. 
Call 223-4012 for details. 



Walk n' Dodgers 

The Walk n' Dodgers 
Square Dance Club is holding 
a dance on April 21 at Viking 
Park Center, 4374 Old Grand Ave., 
Gurnce, at 6:30 p.m. For more infor- 
mation call 336-0959. 

Suburban singles 

The Northwest Suburban Singles 



Invite all singles to a dance at 7 p.m. 
on Sunday, April 21, at The Barn of 
Barrington Restaurant, 1415 S. 
Barrington Rd. There will be DJ dance 
music. Admission of $5 Includes a 
buffet For more Information call 786- 
8688. 

Barat dance company 

The Performing Arts Center at 
Barat College presents The Barat 
Repertory Dance Company in 
Concert on April 26 and 27 at 8 p.m. 
and April 28 at 3 p.m. The perfor- 
mances will take place at the Drake 
Theater at Barat College, 700 E. 
Wcstlclgh Rd, Lake Forest Admission 
Is $9 for adults, $7 for students and 
seniors. Tickets can be obtained by 
calling 295-2620 Monday through 
Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., or by mail- 
ing a request to Drake Theater. 

Art lecture 

Kevin Conscy, director and 
CEO of the Museum of 
Contemporary Art in Chicago, 
will give a lecture on Sunday, 
April 21, at 3 p.m. at Barat 
College. This discourse will 
examine the relationship 
between the museum and 
what It means to the city of 
Chicago, the region and the 
nation. A reception will fol- 
low. For more information or to regis- 
ter, call 234-3000, cxt 380. 

Lilies, landscaping 

Jessica Deis, senior landscape 
architect at The Synncstvcdt Com- 
pany, will speak at 3 p.m. on Sunday, 
April 21 on "Lilies and Landscape 
Gardening" at die Chicago Botanic 
Garden at a free, public slide 
show/lecture sponsored by the 
Wisconsin Illinois Lily Society. The 
talk will be preceded by a lily bulb sale 
starling at 2 p.m. Call 733-0071 for 
details. 




New Merchandise 
Arrives Daily! 

Department Store of Recycled Finery 

FEATURING 10 DEALER SHOPS 

AND CONSIGNMENTS OF ANTIQUES, COLLECTIBLES 

HOME FURNISHINGS OF ALL ERAS 



April Discounts 

10% OFF Yellow Tag 
Consignments 

20% OFF Red Tag 

Consignments 

15% OFFDealer Booms 



Consignments of 
Antiques, Collectibles, 
Home Furnishings and 

Vintage Clothing 

ACCEPTED DAILY! 

Call before coming in. 



Cencula Court 

37041 N. Rte. 83 
Lake Villa, DL 



265-9090 



M-F 11-7, Sat 10-5, Sun. 12-5 



Traditional Native American Pow Wow 



ii 



Saturday, April 27 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. 
(Grand entry at noon and 5 p.m.) 

Physical Education Center 
College of Lake County, 19351 W. Washington St, Grayslake 



Festivities include storytelling, Native American 

dancing and drum playing, singing, arts & crafts 

and sampling of Native American foods. 




Tickets: $3 adults, $1 children 6-12 
Children 5 and under are free. 



Call 223-660 h ext 2300 for tickets and information. 

* - . * . 



r SpEciAl Events— 

'Run for the Son* kicks off with garage sale 

Ambassador's Chapter of the Christian Motorcycle Assn. will kick off 
their annual "Run for the Son" with a garage sale on April 19 and 20 at 
2317 Galilee in Zlon, from 9 a.m. to 4*30 p.m. both days. 

Turning Point holds rummage sale 

Turning Point's rummage sale will take place on April 19 and 20 from 
9 a. m. to 5 p.m. at the greenhouse, located at the cast end of the Turning 
Point property, located 1 mile east on Rte. 47 at 1 1023 Rte. 14, Wood- 
stock. All proceeds benefit women and children who arc victims of 
domestic violence and sexual assault Call (815)338-8081 for details. 

Lake Forest College celebrates Earth Day 

Lake Forest College invites the public to attend its second annual Earth 
Day celebration on April 20, from 2 to 9 p.m., In the Commons lawn of Mid- 
dle Campus, east of Sheridan Road. Call 735-6010 for more information 

Tack n' craft sale slated 

The Hoovcd Animal Humane Society, a non-profit organization dedi- 
cated to the protection of hoovcd animals, Is hosting Its annual Tack N' 
Craft Sale at the HAMS Rehabilitation Farm, 10804 McConncll Rd., Wood- 
stock, on April 20 and 21 from 10 a. m to 5 p.m. Admission is $1. For more 
de tails call Sheila Eller at (815)337-5563. 

Volo Bog holds EcoFest 

Come to Volo Bog, 28478 W. Brandenburg Rd., Ingleside, on April 21 
for an EcoFest Open House from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Featured will be 
Ranald McDonald and Woodsy Owl. The event is free; reservations are 
requested but not required. Call (815)344-1294 for further information. 

CLC celebrates Native American week 

A keynote speech by Jim Northrop, author of the book "Walking the 
Rez Road," will be one of the hlghllgh ts of Native American Awareness 
Week, April 22 to 27, at the College of Lake County. The celebration will 
start with North nip's lecture at 7:30 p.m. April 22 in the auditorium. 
Tickets are $5 general admission, $3 for CLC students and alumni. A 
pow wow will be be held April 27 in the Physical Education Center, 
Building 7. Tickets arc $3 for adults and $1 for children 6 to 12 years old. 
For information and tickets call 223-6601, exL 2300. 



(BSE/AMID© a 
MZTCftL ©PSBQ5IL 




TOO 12x12 VINYL TILE 
$1.89 per sq. ft. 

CERAMIC 12x12 - 99* a sq. ft. 
8x8 750 a sq. ft. 

Installed or Take ft Home! 

Check out our Selection of 

Ceramic - Carpet - 

vinyl and Hardwood 

m&ls FLOORING OUTLET 

Corner of Rt 12 & Bonner Rd. • Wauconda 

(847)526-5815 



WE 11 MOT 

OR 
BEAT ALL 
PRICESI 




World of Difference Guarantee 
If you're not Mliifled, we're not Htkfied 



*^S1 



Pm 



Professionally Installed 

With Lifetime Installation 

Guarantee Or Do-It Yourself, 

Shop At Home Service 

. Also Available 

Hours: Mon-Fri. 9-8 
Sat 9-5 • Sun. 10-3 




. - - • ... -.- _,„ » 



i 



■ 



.4 





1AKEUFE UktlANd NrwspApcRs Aptil 19,1996 



Republican campaign '96 — a little 'oui, oui' 



I've got a new campaign strat- 
egy for the Republicans, guaran- 
teed to get them sonic older vot- 
ers, instead of just old candidates 
like Dole. 

Now that it looks like Dole's 
going to clinch 
the nomination 
after all, and con- 
sidering he has 
the personal 
appeal of dried 
beef jerky, the 
Republicans arc 
going to need a 
new, exciting 
idea to stir up the 
voters. Some- 
thing with more pizzazz than the 
flat tax theory, which seems to 
have fallen. ..flat. 

My suggestion is that they 
ought to look overseas and pay 
attention to what those wild and 
crazy French folks arc up to when 
they're not kissing. To be more 
specific, what the French arc 
doing over there is gambling. 

Not that we here in the United 
States arc exactly strangers to 
gambling. In fact, with off-track 
betting, Indian Reservation casi- 
nos, riverboat gambling and a lot- 
tery for every day of the week, I 
figure it's only a matter of time 
before we can place bets at the 
doctor's office while wc wait 
("$50 says that man over there 
has gout!" "You're on!") 

But, you know the French — 
they like to stay one step ahead of 
the crowd. So, instead of just 
betting on the horses or a royal 
flush, they are placing bets on 
...death! Yes, you heard mc 
right — death. 



It's quite simple, really. A 
prospective buyer makes a down 
payment on a real estate property 
while the owner is alive. He pays 
periodic installment payments 
until the owner dies, at which 



LIFE'S 
BEAR 

DONNA ABEAR 




time the property changes hands. 
The amounts arc proportional to 
the owner's age— in other words, 
the less time that the seller Is ex- 
pected to live, the larger your 
payments. 

Which means, it is basically a 
gamble with death— if the owner 
dies before he is statistically ex- 
pected to, the buyer ends up pay- 
ing far less than market value for 
the property. If the owner is 
someone like George Burns and 
lives to be 100, the buyer has 
gambled and lost — he'll still re- 
ceive the property, but only after 
paying a great deal more than 
what it was worth. 

Intriguing, isn't it? And It's 
definitely a seller's market — you 
put your house up for sale, collect 
the down payment and regular 
installments, and gain extra 
income (not to mention a little 
incentive to keep on living and 
beat the odds). And once you die, 
you won 't care whether or not the 
buyer got your property for a 



song— you lived quite nicely in 
the meantime off those pay- 
ments. You can't lose. 

Also, this would be a perfect 
way to get back at your adult chil- 
dren, most of whom may have 
been Jockeying 
for inheritance 
position ever 
since you hit 
retirement age. 
Oh, sure, you 
could leave the 
house to them, 
but why? Did 
anyone leave 
you a house? No! 
Let the little vul- 
tures get their own! 

Just picture it — seniors be- 
coming their own "death" book- 
ies. No more dragging your walk- 
er to the local 7-11 for those lot- 
tery tickets. No more buying 50 
copies of Reader's Digest just to 
win the sweepstakes. 

And the Republicans could 
tout this as a way for seniors to 
make up the difference in Social 
Security and Medicare cuts. Re- 
inforce their smaller government 
theory. More power to the elder- 
ly. That sort of thing. 

Senator Dole can even use this 
gambling idea as his theme, say- 
ing that he's "making his bid on 
the White House." 

Anyway, it's just an idea. I 
thought it might make the pres- 
idential race a little-more inter- 
esting. Personally, I think Dole 
should pick some other property 
to bid on. 1 doubt that Ginton is 
going to bite the dust just yet 

$5 says he's got at least anoth- 
er four years left in him. 



Quilt exhibit showcases journey through life 



As a child growing up in 
Grays lake in the 1800s, Jennifer 
Forvor Neville learned to quilt for 
purely practical reasons. It wasn't 
until her own children were 
grown that Neville transcended 
the traditional meaning of quilt- 
ing, and began weaving artistic 
impressions of her life and her 
love of gardening into her quilts. 
The Neville Family Quilt 
Collection, preserved by the fam- 
ily for half a century, will be on 
display at the Lake County Forest 
Preserves' Lake County Museum 
through Jan. 10, 1997. 

The exhibit illustrates the art 
of one Lake County woman's 
evolution from family-taught tra- 
ditional designs to a flowering of 
Individual expression. Ranging in 
age from the 1880s to the 1940s, 
the quilts are outstanding exam- 



ples of craftsmanship featuring 
superior stitching, precise 
applique and piecing as well as 
exquisite colors. 

Sec The Neville Family Quilt 
Collection during the museum's 
regular hours, 11 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m. Monday through Saturday, 
and 1 to 4:30 p.m. on Sunday. 



General admission to the 
museum is $2 for adults, $1 for 
youth ages 4 through 17. Children 
ages 3 and under enter free. Or, 
come to the museum on Free 
Admission Mondays and browse 
through the galleries for free. 

For more Information call the 
museum at 526-7878. 




AAa^s 




CANOE Wild Mississippi River Backwaters 
BIKE wild back roads and trails 
DRIVE scenic tour routes 



FREE Brochures and Guide maps 
ALAMAKEE CO. TOURISM & DEVELOPMENT OFRCE 
110 Allamakee Street Waukon, Iowa 521 72 
1-800-824-1424 




EARLY BIRD 



Hurry! 
Offer 
Ends 

MAY 15th, 1996 



90 DAYS 
SAME AS CASH 




POOL/ SPA SALE! 




BBSsig 

1 



COMPLETE 

POOL PACKAGES 

STARTING AT 

§799 _. HOT TUBS 

'100 DEPOSIT HOLDS ®A\\\V 5 J J Q B 

ANY POOL ^, n Storting At BB fii M «# 



ThmmSgK 




In l!u-.in,-- Sinrr /flfH 



(847)566-4880 



26074 N. Hwy. 83 

Corner of Diamond 

Lake & 60/83 

Mundelein 



usTc Notes 

by Greg May 



Country bands throw their 
hats in for 'Applause for 
Paws' benefit April 20 

Ramblta* Fever and two other country and western bands 
have joined in on the "Applause for Paws" benefit to be held 
this Saturday, April 20, at The Paradise Beach Club in Ingles id c. 
There will be four different shows going on at the same time! On 
the Main Stage, Bush Pilot, Dashboard Dogs, Empty Pockets, 
Minefield Dancer, Nick Laramie and the Groove, and Redeye 
Express will be ending the night with an open Jam session. 

In the Tropical Country Saloon, Uamblin' Fever and the 
other two country and western bands will take their turns at the 
stage while all of the Main Stage acts perform acoustic in the 
VIP Room. If that's not enough, there will also be a DJ and large 
dance floor in the Main Bar Room. The first bands will really 
begin at 7:30 p.m.! This show is sure to sell out, so get there 
early to be sure you don't miss out on this show. 

The benefit is for JES Exotic Sanctuary, a no-kill animal shel- 
ter for lions, tigers, bears and other animals, all who had cither 
been abused, starved or in danger of death. You can contact JES 
Exotic Sanctuary at (414)736-9386. 

Weekly jam sessions/open mike 

Tuesday, Kristof s in Round Lake Beach, hosted by Redeye 
Express, call 546-2512 or 587-5525; Wednesday, Christi's in An- 
tioch, hosted by Easy Action, 395-2885; Wednesday, Offsides in 
Mundelein, hosted by JD Alton, 949-6240; Thursday, Paradise 
Beach Club in Inglcsidc, hosted by Redeye Express, 546-0880 or 
587-5525. 

live music 

Friday: Frigates, Inglcsidc— Empty Pockets, 587-3211; Par- 
adise Beach Club, Inglcsidc— Main Stage, Total Eclipse, VIP 
Room, Soul Mates Reggae, and in the Tropical Country Saloon, 
Uamblin' Fever, 546-8880; Madison Avenue, Waukegan— The 
Greg Rockingham Jazz Trio, 662-6090. 

Saturday: Christi's, Antioch— Strict Nine, 395-2885; Kristofs, 
Round Lake Beach— Rear Window, 546-2512; Leisure Point, Fox 
Lake— Black Alley Blues, 973-0235; Main Event, Round Lake— 
LYZ, 546-9795; Paradise Beach dub, Inglcside— Applause for 
Paws Benefit, 546-8080; Poor Richard's, Gurncc— Radioactive, 
244-2290. .,iM»Mimn/tKPoj 



Author Bill Granger to visit library 

The Friends of the Waukegan Public Library are sponsoring a visit 
from author and columnist Bill Granger on April 20 at 1 p.m. in the 
library auditorium, 128 N. County St This is a free program. 

Granger has written 24 published novels and four non-fiction books 
in addition to writing for The Daily Herald and the Chicago Tribune 
Magazine. _ 

No registration is needed. Call 623-2041 for further details. 



Name the City Home to 

The Tallest Observation Tower in The U.S. 

byJIMWARNKEN, 

PRESIDENT, NORTH STAR TRAVEL, INC. 

No, It's not Seattle. 

I'll gtvo you a hint This city lays claim to both the world's largest electric sign 
and free-standing billboard. 

If you don't have It yet, this should give It away. The world's largest slot-machine 
Jackpot was won here recently. 

That's right. Las Vegas has another "biggest in the wortd" claim. 

After many delays, the long-awaited Stratosphere Tower Is due to open the end 
of this month. And In true Las Vegas style, It boasts much more than just being the 
tallest free-standing observation tower In the U.S. 

Oh sure, you'll find the Vegas usual. Three "themed" casinos, two lounges and 
almost 3,000 of the newest slots and video machines In the world. Included In Its 
seven restaurants Is Its claim to "the best buffet In Las Vegas". 

Since there Is certainty no shortage of buffets In Las Vegas, I doubt I'll try theirs. 
However the revolving fine dining restaurant at the very top of the Stratosphere, 
appropriately called the "Top of The World" will probably be a dinner stop the next 
time I'm In Vegas. 

Not let's get to the fun stuff. 

The Stratosphere houses not only the world's highest roller coaster, but another 
thrill ride called The Space Shot". Thts air-powered rldo thrusts 16 passengers at 
a time up a mast which extends 1 92 ft. above the top of the already 1 00 story high 
Stratoshpere Tower. The lucky riders will "enjoy" up to 4.5 G-forces going up and 
negative 1 G-Force on the way down. 

For a little less excitement, you can ride the double-decker express elevators to 
both indoor & outdoor observation decks for an Incredible view of the city. 

At the base of the tower on the site of the defunct Vegas World Hotel Is the 
Stratosphere Hotel. Your travel agent can book an air/hotel package at the 
Stratosphere Hotel through Funjet Vacations. The only draw-back to staying at 
this hotel may be Its location. It's pretty far north on the strip, while most of the 
newer resorts are at the south end. 

By the way, the largest free-standing billboard belongs to the Treasure Island 
Resort, the largest electric sign Is the four-block-long canopy which now covers 
Fremont Street In downtown Las Vegas and largest slot machine jackpot of $10.9 
million dollars was won Oct. 18 of last year at the Gold Coast Hotel and Casino. 



721A E. Grand Lindenhurst, II 
24 Hr. Recorded Bargains - 356-2000 

(847)356-3010 



^ 



nWHhlll I I liiilll'i'llTll H 



fcj 



April 19,1996 UlcElANd Newspapers LAKELIFE 



MoviE Pick 

jPrimaT slides despite high 'Gere' 




If you arc a Richard Gere fan 

we are, you will enjoy "Primal 
[car" simply because he's never 
>okcd better and his acting 
frowess is cutting edge. 

If the only Edward Norton you 
icw before viewing the movie Is 
ic honcymooners' upstairs 
icighbor, you'll leave the theater 
remembering a younger Norton 
/ho turns out to be one of the 
>cst young actors to appear on 
le Hollywood scene in a while, 

'Primal Fear," a timely O. J. 
[Simpson trial look alike, starts 
[out like gangbusters, but like the 
[month of March, becomes lamb- 
like until the ending triple twist 

The first part of the movie 
[sinks deep in excesses with Gere 
i playing a sharply dressed, slip- 
pery legal eagle who works hard 
at public soaring. 

Norton is the baby-faced stut- 
tering client Gere sees sending 
him over the top after he gets him 
acquitted of the murder of the 
archbishop of Chicago, no less. 

The many Chicago scenes will 
prove interesting to our Lake 
County readers. Our slick attor- 
ney and the audience seem to 
think the accused is innocent, or 
is he? Gere slides from jail cell to 
courtroom looking like an 
Armani mode], flashing a win- 
ning smile from time to time 
when it matters, and delivering 
an interestingly smooth perfor- 
mance. 

The unknown Norton, who 
reportedly won the role over hun- 
dreds of young actors, turns out 

to bo that unusual actor who def- 
initely establishes himself with 
one performance, of course the 
role of Aaron is probably one of 
the meatiest roles of the year. 

The picture's Marcia Clark is 
Laura Llnncy, only this time she 
turns out to be blond and one of 
Gere's exs, which is a bit much. 
John Mahoncy as a typical 
Chicago politico, Molly Arington, 
playing a psychiatrist, and the 



General Cinema 

LAKEHURST 



I ROUTE 43 near ROUTE 120 
473-4300 



BL00DSP0RT2 

Fr-Su 1:45, 3:45, 5:45, 7:45, 9:45 

Mo-Th 5:45. 7:45, 9:45 (R) 



KIDS IN THE HALL 

Fr-Su 1:15, 3:15, 5:15, 7;15, 9:15 
Mo-Th 5:15, 7:15, 9:15 (R) 



CELTIC PRIDE 

Fr-Su 1:30, 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:30 
Mo-Th 5:30. 7:30, 9:30 (PQ-13) 



THE SUBSTITUTE 

Fr-Su 1:00, 3:15, 5:30, 7:45, 10:00 
Mo-Th 5:30, 7:45, 10:00 (R) ' 



OLIVER & COMPANY 

Fr-Su 1:00, 2:35, 4:15,5:40 
Mo-Th 5:40 (G) .__ 



DIADOUQUE 

7:15. 9:30 (H) 



JAMES AND THE GIANT PEACH 

"Fr-Su 1:00. 3:00, 5:00. 7:00, 9:00 
Mo-Th 5:00, 7:00. 9:00 (PG) 



BIRDCAGE 

Fr 1:45, 4:30, 7:15. 9:50 
Sa 1:45, 430, SNEAK, 9:50 
Su 1:45, 430, 7:15, 950 
Mo-Th 5:00, 7:30. 9:50 (R) 



EXECUTIVE DECISION 

Fr-Su 4:30, 930 - Mo-Th 5:00, 9:30 (R) 



SOT. BILKO 

Fr-Su 2:00, 7:00 - Mo-Tn 7:30 (PG) 



THIN LINE BETWEEN LOVE AND HATE 

Fr-Su 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 

Mo-Th 5:00, 7:30. 9:45 (R) 



"Fair 

Fr-Su 1:15. 3:25. 5:35. 7:45, 9:55 
Mo-Th 5:35. 7:45, 9:55 (R) 



PRIMAL FEAR 

Fr-Su 2:00. 4:30. 7:10. 9:40 
Mo-Th 5:00, 7:25, 9:45 (R) 



MRS. WINTERBOURNE 

Fr-Su 1:00, 3:15, 5:30, 7:45, 10.00 ' 
Mo-Th 5:30, 7:45, 10:00 (PG-13) 



GIFT CERTIFICATES ON SALE 




Richard Gere 

trial's judge, played brilliantly by 
Alfrc Woodard, round out a fine 
cast 

This movie at first glance 
seems to have it all, pretty people, 
suspense, plot twist upon plot 
twist, good acting, etc., but it just 
misses being a top drawer legal 
beacon by a few hairs. 

Maybe the fact that its direc- 



tor, 'Gregory Hoblit made his 
mark in top cop-court TV dra- 
mas, keeps "Fear* on the small 
screen level. 

This is a good movie, worthy 
of a 3.5 out of five star rating, but 
the trailers had us expecting so 
much more. "Fear" is rated R for 
violence and strong language. — 
by GLORIA DAVIS 



Belvidere Mall 

Theatres 662-741 

Belvidere at Lewis in Waukegan 



Ample Parking 



£ Si .50 all seats all shows 

K DOWN PERISCOPE (PQ| 
■J Frt. & Mon.-Thur. 5:10 
EJ Sat & Sun. 1:10. 3:10. 5:10 
[] Keiaey Grammar 

D WHEN WE WERE COLORED (PO) 

W\ DnilY 7:05. 9:30 

M PTrytda Raahad. laaac Hayea, Al Fraoman 

an FROM DUSK TILL DAWN (R) 

■J Fri. & Mon.-Thur. 5:05, 7:15. 0:30 

U SaL 4 Sun, 1:00, 3:00. 5:05, 7:15, 9:30 

d Juliet Lewis, Harvey Wotsl Quentln TarantJoo 

BBHDQBBQBBBBBBHBHBHBBBHBBQBwQSQQBBUa 



OIRLB(R) 

Frt. & Mon.-Thur. 5:05. 7:15. 9:30 

Sal & Sun. 1:00, 3:00. 5:05, 7:15. 9:30 

Spite ln 

JUMANJI (PO) 

Fit & Mon.-Thur. 5:00, 7:20 

Sat & Sun, 1 rOO, 3:00, 5:00, 750 

Robin Williams 



U 

n 

LI 

a 

a 
a 
a 
a 

a 



DOHT Be A MENACE TO SOUTH CENTRAL (R) n 

Dally 9:40 LJ 

The Wayana Brothers 3 



FOX LAKE THEATRE 

115 Lakeland Plaza ■ Fox Lake 



{847)973-2800 ■£•' 

GEN ADMISSION 55 5 * M ' 



PLAYING Apr. 19 - Apr. 25 



CELTIC PRIDE (PG-13) 



Fri. 6:15 • 7:40 • 10KB 

Sat, 12:40 • 250 • S:15 • 7:40 • 10*5 

SunJWad. 12:40 • 2£0 • 5:16 • 7:40 

MorUTba.SThur. 6:16 • 7:40 



MRS. WINTERBOURNE (PG-13) SGT. BILKO (PG) 



• Fri. 5:10 • 730 • fcSO 

SaL 1220 • 2:40 • 5:10 • 7:30 • 0-.50 

Suru/Wed. 1220 • 2:40 • 5:10 • 730 

Mon/TbaJThur. 5:10 • 730 



BIRDCAGE (R) 



Fri. 5:05 « 7:35 • 10:00 

SaL 12:10 • 235 • 6*5 • 735 • 1030 

Sun-Wed. 12:10 • 235 • 535 • 735 

Mofu/TbayThur. 535 • 735 



■ Fri. 520 • 7.-45 • 9:55 

SaL 1230 • 2:45 • 520 • 7:45 • 9:55 
Suiu/Wed. 1230 - 2*5 • 520 • 7:45 

MonTTuo JThur. 520 • 7*5 



JAMES & THE GIANT PEACH (PG) 

Frt 530 • 7:56 

Sat/SurWWad. 1230 • 130 • 335 • 530 • 735 

Moo/Tua./Thur. 530 • 7:66 



When' Movie Got' it v /s Still Fttit Ami Affordable 



MOVIES & TIMES START FRIDAY, 4-19-96 



*••**•*•***** 



*<***-*****-*-***- 



* LAKE Zl'Rini THEATRES * ANTI0CH THEATRE (847)395-0216 * 

71 \ O47-GC30-0000 '8 Lake Street. Anhaeh 

if /^i Surround Bound 

\^fr lO Scri-r-nn 



37S Lake Street. Anlioch 



<ei0MuUM«fSF«:aS0Chfchn<1UUr«W} 



S*>50 Dairy Afternoon Show* 
O Mon.-FrtUL5pjn. 


Df ■ TK UUj HUH CA»T 

1 :30-4:1 0*40*40 (PG) | 


amcrac 

V 45-4 -M-7. 00-0. 20 


(PQ13) 


1:00-3:40-650-0 00 


(PQ13) 


JAMES AMD TK WAUT 

12:1 5-2:1 S-«:t 5*30*30 


PEAOI 
(PQI 


PtllUlrUI 

12:103:30-6:30-0:20 


m 


MT.iaio 

1:10-4:004:50 


IPO) 


0:10 


(PQ13) | 


ouvat & COMPACT 

12:40-2:30-4:30 (O) 


HU 

1:30-3:50-0:40-8:50 


(H) 


TatfBtftOCACC 

1230-3:15-6:00-6.50 


in \ 


Ail MU 60 TO bVAVH 2 

12:50-Z30-4 45 (Q) 1 


MMO 

850-0:10 


(R) 


*•** + + **■** 


* • • 



•4.00 Adults; *2.00 Children (1 1 & under) 
Bargain Matinee unll S30 p.m. 

mSnSmjmmSnSm 

Fri. 6:30-6:30: SaL A Sun. 2:30-4:30*30*30; I 



Mon.-TMun. 7:30 



(PQ) 



MCHENRY INDOOR THEATRE 
lyn't ilr.-.-ii hi (hi'.} uif. (11,1-1. 



•4.00 Aduls; *2.00 Chidron (1 1 & under) 
Bargain Matinee lil S30 

(R) 



Fri , 8*t * Em. 6 30-aOO; Mon-Thura. 7.1 5 



&■! tSm. 2^30-4 -30 



(Q) 



IP CUM AMI PBUOaUL ( pai3) 

«,S* ISui l1HB:U«fi-ltw.7» 

MJVBt I COHNUrr {Q> 

S*HSufvMW15 



* LIBERTY 1 & 2 (847) 362-3011 * 

* 708 N. Milwaukee Ave Liberty vill'e • 



Adult ■ *4~; Children 11 & Under *3T- 
Bargain Matin— 3*1. 5 Sun. 'Til 2:30 • *2"- 

lUVaMULSVEWS (R) 

Fri. Sal 4 Sun. ft. SO- 9.00: Man.-Trnjra. 7:1 S 



Frt., Mm.-Thurm. T.X; S»L 1 Sun. 1:*M:3r> 



0M.I Sun. 1:45-3:30-5:45 



(Q) 



* * * * 



* * * 



Be TIhere 



SATURcky 



Illinois Audubon Society plans field trips 

On April 20 the McHcnty County Chapter of Illinois Audubon Society 
will join McHcnry County Conservation Dist.'s resident turkey expert, 
Richard Adams, searching for wild turkeys at Glacial Park at 7:30 a.m. 
Call Barb Mcding at (815)385-6717 for details. On April 27, the group will 
look for woodcocks and whipporwills at Illinois Beach State Park. Call 
Hence Baadc at (815)337-4427 by April 19 to register. 



w— 



AAUW 'travels' to Mexico 

The Waukegan Area Branch of the American Assn. of University 
Women will meet at the home of Norma Kcndriclc on April 23 at 7 p.m. to 
hear a program about Copper Canyon In Mexico. Call 662-6388 for details. 

Bicycle club meets 

The Bicycle Club of Lake County will hold their monthly meeting on 
April 23 at 7 p.m. at the Llbcriyvillc Civic Center, 135 W. Church. For 
more Information call the BCLC hotline at 415-1820. 

Philatelic society meeting slated 

"Plate Number Colls & How to Collect Them" Is the topic of the 7 p.m. 
April 23 meeting of the Lake County Philatelic Society at the Warren-New- 
port Public Library, 224 N. O'Plaine Rd., Gurnce. Call 244-4048 for details. 

Knitters learn to make flmo buttons 

The Lake County Knitter's Guild will meet April 23 at 7:15 p.. m at the 
Riverwoods Town Hall, 300 Portwine, between Lake Cook and Dcerfield 
Roads. Eleanor Yura will teach how to make fimo buttons. For more 
information call Linda Lutz at 847-7795. 



TrjURsdAy 



Trace Civil War ancestors 

The Lake County Genealogical Society's April 25 meeting will teach 
"How to Trace Civil War Ancestors." They will meet at 930 a.m. at St. 
Lawrence Episcopal Church, 125 W. Church St. LJbertyville. Call 587-5349. 



GURNEE CINEMA 

GURNEE MILLS SHOPPING MALL ■ 847-855-9940 



sa err. special «.m weds & fri afternoon, bargain matinees • adults uso before sao 

CHILDREN UNDER 6 NOT ADMITTED TO "fl" RATED FEATURES 
FEATURES AND SHOWTIMES FOR: FHIDAY, APRIL 19 THRU THURSDAY, APRIL 2S 



CELTIC PRIDE 



MRS. WINTERBOURNE 



THE SUBSTITUTE 



BRAIN CANQY WOWSI 



JAMES i THE GIANT PEACH 



FEAR 



FURTINQ WITH DISASTER 



PRIMAL FtAR (HQPASSi 



SOT. BILKO 



THE BIRDCAGE 



THIN UNE, LOVE A HATE 



EXECUTIVE DECISION 



OU VER A CO. 



A FAMILY THI NO 



PG-13 



PG-13 



F-SU 1!0M:0S4 iO S.7M4:05: M-TH 5:05-7:05*05 



PO 



PO 



F-SU t3dO-2:45-5:<P-7;15-9:30; M-TH 5=00.7:15-930 



F-SU 1:45-4:35-7:0>8:3S: M-TH 4:3S-7K30-<.2S 



RSU 12nQ.«P4aMJO«a-1IW0: M-TH 4.-Q0<»«^r>1M0 



F-SU US5-2 J04 JfM:5O<:50: M-TH 4 -SM-.WSa 



F-SU iai5M:0r>5:15'7:4M:S5: M-TH 5:15-7:4M^5 



F-SU t:3fr3:25-5:30-Tj3S-9:40: M-TH M0-7M4:*Q 



F-SU 1:30-4:t5-7i1M^O: M-TH 4:15-7:10-fcS0 



F-SU 1^16-3:1 Ma5-7J0-9:35: M-TH 5aS-TaO»JS 



F-SU 1:15-4:1 rX:4W:15; M-TH 4:1M:4S-fc1S 



F-SU 1230-2:40-5^0-730-9:40: M-TH i&VTOM'M 



F-SU 1:40-4:25-7:05-9:45; M-TH 435-7^5*45 



F-SU 12:45-2 J0-4:1 5; M-TH 4:18 



ALL DOGS 00 TO HEAVEN 2 



.FARQO 

■1 



PG-13 F-TH 8:55*10 



F-TH550 



F-SU 1:1f>3:1S-7i5-9:30; M-TH 7:25-9:00 



>c 



MUNDELEIN CINEMA 

Lake County - You're Invited To 

V GhOUliSh Wedding! 

Dawne Morris will take William Napier's hand 
in unholy matrimony on Saturday, April 20th, 1996 

Just Before TtiC RCCty HOiTOr RctAK S&0H at 1 1:30 p.m. 
at the Mundelein Cinema 

$3.00 Admission with invitation 
(Pick up at theater or from the Bride and Groom) Reg. $5.00 

FOR INFORMATION, CALL 566-5444 



155 N. SEYMOUR MUNDELEIN 

fc 4 



C^ CiNEpUx OdeoN TNeatres 



The Birdcage (R) (dts stereo) 

Fri, Mon-Thu 7:25-950; Sat-Sun (2.-Q0) 435-7:25-9:50 



Mrs. Winterbourne' (PG-U> (Dolby Stereo) 
Fri, Mon-Thu 7:10-9:45; Sat-Sun (1:45) 430-7:10-9:45 



Primal Fear (R) (Dolby Stereo) 

Fri, Mon-Thu 7:00-9:40; Sot-Sun (1:15) 4:00-7:00-9:40 



fames and the Giant Peach (PG) (Dolby Stereo) 

Fri, Mon-Thu 7:05-9:05; Sat^Sun (1:05) 3:05-5:05-7:05-9:05 



Fargo (RJ (Dolby Stereo) 
Fri, Mon-Thu 7:45-10:00; Sat-Sun (1:10) 3:20-5:30-7:45-10:00 



Kids in the Hath Brain Candy (R) (Dolby Stereo) 



Fri, Mon-Thu 7:50-10.00; Sat-Sun (1:45) 3:45-5:45-7:50-10:00 



13 



Flirting With Disaster (R) (Dolby Stereo) 

Fri, Mon-Thu 735-9:55; Sat-Sun (1:30) 3:30-5:30-7:35-9:55 



Sgt. Bilko (PG) (DTS Stereo) 

Fri, Mon-Thu7:35-9:45; Sat-Sun (1:15) 3:20-5:25-7:35-9:45 




HAWTHORN CENTE 

.■>■;<■ ■ :■;.:■-.■.,■ ■ -w :■-■>:■.- ■ : v>:v":<v-:.;.: : : : ;.>;.:-:. r HvX-- : :<v-i-?>:-:->>--:-K*:v-- .-^•:-; ! ■;::-:-: :>>:;: : :-: T ; 



The Substitute (R) 
Fri, Mon-Thu 7:15-9:50; Sat-Sun (1:30) 4:00-7: 15-9:50 



Celtic Pride' (PG-13) (Dolby Stereo) 
Frt, Mon-Thu 7:40-10:00; Sat-Sun (1:10) 3:20-5:30-7:40-10:00 



Fear* (R) (Dolby Stereo) 

Fri, Mon-Thu 7:20-9:30; Sat-Sun (1:00) 3:10-5:10-7:20-9:30 



Executive Decision (R) 

Fri-Thu 7:00-9:40 



"No Passra 



All Dogs Go To Heaven 2 (G) 

Sat-Sun (1:15-3:15-5:15) 






' 



LAKEUFE LaIccIanc) Newspapers Apnil 19,1996 



>i 



I 



■■.. i 



Crossw/orcI 



ACROSS 

1 Hardly the 

elite type? 
5 Mandible 
8 Funnyman 

Foxx 

12 Do nothing 

13 Prior to 

14 Met melody 

15 Arabian 
sultanate 

16 Miles from 
Massachusetts? 

18 Siblings 

20 Words from 
pen pals? 

21 Republicans, now 

22 Bikini part 

23 A or F 

26 Contingency 
flier 

30 Diving bird 

31 Old French coin 

32 Guidonian 
note 

33 Seinfeld's 
specialty 

36 Strauss piece 

38 Still, in 
verse 

39 Nancy's man 

40 Actor Milo 

43 Acts the stoolie, 
maybe 

47 Par 

49 Midtemv, eg. 

50 "Mona — •" 

51 Itsy-bitsy 



1 


z 


3 


4 


1 




6 


7 


1 


r 


sr- 


to 


11 


\t 








r 






, 








\i 








r 






17 










id 








19 








2A 












,",;■' mr 




922 






j 


23 


24 


25 




■ 26 








27 


20 


29 


30 








31 


, 




_.... 


32 






33 






34 


35 




■ 


36 


37 










3d 






■" 








40 


41 


42 






a 


43 








44 


45 


40 


47 










40 






1 


«d 









56 








1 


51 






52 






a 






I 


54 

L 






55 





Horoscope, 








V 

N 


i 


S 

1 




Is 


3 


iBh 


i 


u 


o 


3 


3 


mIv 


S 


1 


1 


n 


V 


X 


3 


a 


U 


vja 


N 


V 


1 


s 


s 


u 


3 


OlNll 


J 


Iv 


3 


H 


s 


ol 




NOfH 




El 


2 


i 


1 


V Mffld 


nla 


N|V|l|S| 


V 


i 


s CDHS ama 


A 





a 


N 


V 


1! 


sELi. 


0|V|B|Q| 

71 ""_ ] 


!> ■ 


V 


d 


8 




S N 


s 


X 


N 


1 


o 


■ s 


IN 


3 





V 


d 


H 


s 


1 


a 


N 


V 


i 


3 


N 


V 


h 


o 


V 

a 


1 
a 


H 
3 


V 

U 


; 


3 


H 


IBM 


2 


V 


n 


M 


V 


rflv 





i 


d 



52 Flooring, 
for short 

53 The right start? 

54 Bandleader 
Brown 

55 Unescorted 
DOWN 

1 Fall into a 
comfy :hair 

2 "— Camera" 

3 Despite 

4 Virgilian epic 

5 Witticisms 

6 Crafts* mates 

7 "Isn't it 
rich? Arc — 
pair?" 

8 Unit of 
measurement 
about 57.3 
degrees 

9 Green acres 

10 Floppy, for one 

1 1 Morse noises 
17 Asia's 

mistress 



19 Away from SSW 

22 A/C mcas. 

23 Tank fill 

24 Same old 
same-old 

25 Police blotter 
abbr. 

26 Bribe 

27 First State: 
abbr. 

28 Luncheonette 
order, briefly 

29 Nickname 
of baseball's 
Carl 

31 "YesrVirginia..." 
newspaper 

34 Wisconsin city 

35 Conked out 

36 Took the prize 

37 Gabriel's ilk 

39 Carnival 
attractions 

40 Christ iania 

4 1 Wield a teaspoon 



42 Possess, 
biblically 

43 Graiis 

44 Maze runner's 
goal 

45 Frog genus 

46 Urban pall 
48 It docs the 

hole job 




ARIES (March 21 to 
April 19) Not everything 
will be to your satisfaction 
on the workfront this week. 
However, since nothing 
major goes wrong, you can 
breathe a little easier. Later 
on, you're delighted by un- 
expected news which ar- 
rives over the weekend. 

TAURUS (April 20 to 
May 20) Unexpected busi- 
ness developments which 
occur now shouldn't throw 
you since they're ultimate- 
ly in your favor. However, 
you need to be careful when 
pulling out those credit 
cards. The weekend Finds 
you in a mood to be by 
yourself. 

GEMINI (May 21 to 
June 20) A relative could be 
reluctant to go along with 
something you propose for 
the family early in the 
week. Some receive an un- 
expected favor or gift mid- 
week. However, this 
weekend, extra duties arise 
in connection with the 
home. 

CANCER (June 21 to 
July 22) Some domestic 
concerns require your im- 
mediate attention in the 
beginning of the week 
before you can tackleSvork 
task.;. In general, it's not a 
good week for home enter- 
taining. Couples, though 
enjoy a fun getaway. 

LEO (July 23 to August 
22) Friendship and money 
don't mix well at all this 




week. You could hove 
second thoughts about a 
business proposition and 
need to explore them fur- 
ther. Your instincts give 
you the key to all the com- 
plexities. 

VIRGO (August 23 to 
September 22) The week 
begins on a somewhat slug- 
gish note as you're not feel- 
ing your best. By midweek, 
some could find themselves 
fighting off a 24-hour bug. 
Once back at work, you 
face some minor problems 
with a co-worker. 

LIBRA (September 23 to 
October 22) Couples aren't 
in agreement about a poten- 
tial purchase. It seems 
you'll have to compromise 
about a business concern 
midweek. However, a 
surprising opportunity ar- 
rives at your doorstep over 
the weekend. 

SCORPIO (October 23 
to November 21) While out 
shopping early in the week, 
be careful that you don't 
pay too much for that 
desired item. Some are 
having second thoughts 



about a previous commit- 
ment. This should teach 
you to say no in the first 
place when you can't fulfill 
something. 

SAGITTARIUS 
(November 22 to Decem- 
ber 21) You're not excited 
about what's on your plate 
this week and you could 
drag your heels as a result. 
However, once you get the 
grunt work out of the way, 
you'll be able to really 
tackle the more important, 
fulfilling tasks. 

CAPRICORN (Decem- 
ber .22 to January 19) 
You're cautious this week 
with spending, especially 
since you're trying to get 
rid of some of that credit 
card debt. In fact, you 
decide against making an 
expensive purchase desired 
by your mate. 

AQUARIUS (January 20 
to February 18) For a while 
this week, you feel that 
you're not getting your 
point across and you're 
frustrated as a result. A 
romantic concern is par- 
ticularly nettling to singles. 
This weekend, an im- 
promptu outing fills the 
bill. 

PISCES (February 19 to 
March 20) While you'd' 
hoped to be able to do some 
socializing by midweek, 
work obligations get in the 
way. Be careful since even 
innocent expenditures can 
mount into something more 
formidable. 

©1996 by King FcaluresSyml. 



MUN D E LEIMdC I N EMft 
W EEKENCFmTE Stt OW 



1 C 



A L °" ADL 



ER PR 



°pUCT| ON / 



DOKT FORGET EVERY SATURDAY NIGHT AT 11:30 P.M. 

THE UNCUT VERSION OF THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW 



IMLFOOIR 
ONE MORE 
FRIDAY 
APRIL 19th 

1 1 :30 PM 

ADMISSION $5.00 

I55N.SEVH0URAUE. 

[8471 566-5444 



MUNDELEIN CINEMA 

Mondays- All Seats $1 .00 

aii sea* $2.00 Presents 



i* DUSK TILL "I I : Hft PPY '" ™ • 

i..P.?.£!?... r . p1 Hi£~.?i££~i 



CALL FOR SHOWTIMES 



FOR INFORMATION. CALL 566-5444 



N. SEYMOUR. MUNOELEIN 





■ 



HORRY IN - FOR OUR 
TOX FREE SflLE!!!! 

Pay NO TUX On flny Furniture Purchase 

Over $50 



Sale Ends April 23, 1996 



395 Lake St. 

Amticch 

(847) 395-4780 








northern IL2nd 

Lapqest Yankee ocentea 

C/anale Dealer 



Mori.- I hups. 10-6 p.m. 
I pi. 10-7 p.m. 
Oaf. 10-5 p.m. 
oun. 11-4 p.m. 



H ■■ 






OBITUARIES 



ApaiU9, 1996 UIceIanc) NewspApm CLASSIFIED 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 





JUSTEN'S 




ROUND LAKE 




FUNERAL HOME 




222 N. Rosedale 




Ct., Hound Lake 




(708) 546-3300 




Jeffrey Jordan, 




Manager/Director 




Mark Justen, 




Owner/Director 




GEORGE R. 




JUSTEN & 




SON FUNERAL 




HOME 




3519 W. Elm St., 




McHenry IL 




(815) 385-2400 


.', 


Mark Justen, 


J 


Owner/Director 




JUSTEN'S 




WONDER LAKE 




FUNERAL HOME 




7611 Hancock Dr., 




Wonder Lake 




(815) 728-0233 




Valerie Kessel, 




Manager/Director 




Mark Justen, 




Owner/Director 


Fvr-V 


RINGA FUNERAL 




HOME 


w 


122 S. Milwaukee 


■►'■ 


Ave., Lake Villa, IL 


i 


(708) 356-2146 




Robert J. Ringa, Jr. 




STRANG FUNERAL 




CHAMEL 




410 E. Beividere 




Grayslake, IL 




.„ (708) 223-8122 ' 


1 


-*- David G. Strang 




and 




Richard A Gaddis, "; 




« Director 


1 


STRANG FUNER- 


9 


AL HOME 


i 


1055 Main St., 




Antioch, IL 




Dan Dugenske, 




Director 




(708) 395-4000 



Ronald R. McGill Sr., 

Age 57, of Fox Lake passed away Wednesday, April 10, 
1996 at St Thercsc Medical Center In Waukcgan. He 
was born May 30, 1930 in Chicago. He has been a resi- 
dent of Fox Lake for the past year and formerly of 
Round Lake. 

Survivors include 3 daughters, Dana of Long Lake, 
Cynthia (Joe) Hclneman of Long Lake and Kim FJoore 
of Tampa, Florida; 5 sons, Ronald R. McGill, Jr., or 
Inglcsldc, John (Sharon) Floorc of Lake Villa, Doug of 
SL Thomas, Tyler (Cindy) of Indianapolis and Todd 
(Dancllc) Floore of Richmond, Indiana; 9 grandchil- 
dren; former wife; Carol (nee Btoch); a sister, Darlcnc 
(Robert) Fcnrich of McHenry; 3 brothers, Edward 
(Lorraine) of Tinley Park, Robert of Fox Lake and 
Donald (Lorraine) of Hanover Park, He is preceded In 
death by his parents. 

Visitation was at the Strang Funeral Chapel, LTD., 410 
E Beividere Rd, Grayslake on Friday, April 12, 1996 
from 6-9 p.m. Funeral services were held at the funeral 
chapel on Saturday at 1 p.m. Rev. Robert Beavcn from 
the St Gilbert Catholic Church in Grayslake officiated. 
Interment followed at the Avon Centre Cemetery in 
Grayslake. 

Ira T. McDonald, 

Age 79, of Round Lake passed away April 15, 1996 at 
Condell Medical Center In LIbcrtyvltlc. He was born 
Scpetmber 20, 1916 in Oglethorpe, Georgia to John and 
Cherry (nee Sassen) McDonald. Resident of Round 
Lake for 42 years formerly of Chicago. He was a truck 
driver for 34 years. Member of Union Local IBT #705 
Teamsters in Chicago. Served In the Army during WWII. 
Past member of American Legion Post #250. 

Survivors include his wife, Marie (Ncc Bottlno) 
whom he married September 6, 1943 In Joplln, 
Missouri; 2 sons, Joseph McDonald of Round Lake 
Beach, Allen McDonald of Hoffman Estates; 1 brother, 
Wallace (Paula) McDonald of Islin, New Jersey; 3 sis- 
ters, Agnes Sapp of Clearwater, Florida, Lucy Bell Bell of 
Winter Park, Florida, Grace Mussclwhlte of Fort Myers, 
Florida; 5 grandchildren; 3 great grandchildren; 1 sis- 
ter-in-law, Evelyn McDonald. He was preceded in 
death by his parents; 2 sisters, and 2 brothers. 

Visitation was held on April 18, 1996 fro m 4-9 p.m. at 
the Justen's Round Lake Funeral Home, 222 N. Rosdale, 
Ct, Round Lake. Funeral services were held Friday, 
April 19, 1996 at 11 a.m. in the funeral home. Rev. Kerry 
Doyall, Pastor of the Lake Region Bible Church, Round 
Lake officiated. Burial followed at the Avon Centre 
Cemetery, Grayslake. Memorials may be made to the 
charity of your choice. 



The DEAdliNE For ObinJARiEs & Death 
NoTicEs is 5 p.M. on TuEsdAy. 



Grief nates 

You can help in a number of special ways. 
Through reaching out and offering support in 
the form of listening and presence you will help 
; a great deal, Ask your friend how they are doing. 
Mention the deceased by name and allow the 
bereaved to continue discussion about the 
deceased if they wish. Many bereaved report 
feeling isolated. You can help by including them 
in your social groups. Contact with the grieving 

How can I help someone 
who is grieving? 

is the most important during the period right 
after the death and in the three or four months 
following when the bereaved feel especially iso- 
lated. Reach out and make your presence felt. 

%.% ttamshex 

fiineraCtfome Ltd. 



12 N. Pistakee Lake Road, Fox Lake, Illinois 

"IfkCfiapetontfieLafZe" 

Serving you Anytime .» Anywhere 

Phone: (847) 587-2100 • (815) 385-1001 



Mildred Margaret Smith, 

Age 72, of Gurnee passed away April 6, 1996 at SL 
Thercsc Medical Center In Waukcgan. She was born 
April 25, 1923 In Waukcgan. She was a member of 
American Legion Gurnee Post #771, Ladles of Vikings, 
at one time she was clerk for the Village of Gurnee and 
she retired from Abbott Labs In 1986. 

Survivors Include 1 daughter, Barbara Smith of 
Gurnee; 1 son, Bruce (Linda) Smith of Allqulppa, 
Pennsylvania; 7 grandchildren, Dawn Kccfcr, BUI, 
Brian, Barry and Dcnlsc Trusky, Kristan and Ryan 
Smith; 5 great grandchildren, Jerry Mahoncy, Heather 
Stmts, Stephanie Trusky, Kyle Kecfcr, Michael Carter; 1 
sister, Violet Robertson ofWaukcgan. She was preceded 
In death by her parents. 

Memorial services were held at 11 a.m. Wednesday, 
April 10, 1996 at the MFH of Gurnee, 305 Cemetery Rd. 
Reverend Marlln Klrby officiated. Burial was private. 
Visitation was from 10- 11 a.m. Wednesday at the funer- 
al home. Memorials may be given to the Gumcc Rescue 
Squad or the Leukemia Society of America, 100 W 
Monroe, Suite 1610, Chicago. 

Florence M. Gelger, 

Age 64, of Grayslake passed away Tuesday, April 16, 
1996 at her home. She was bom November 6, 1931 in 
Chicago and lived In Antioch from 1951-1986 when she 
moved to Grayslake. Florence had worked as a supervi- 
sor at the former Regal China Co. In Antioch and later 
worked for Baxter Lab as a packer of drugs retiring In 
1995. On March 23, 1951, she married William H. 
Geigcr In Cornet, Mississippi and he preceded her in 
death on lune 18, 1982. 

Survivors include 2 sons, Michael (Sandra) of Salem, 
Wisconsin and John (Pamela) of Round Lake Park; 1 
daughter, Pattl (James) Anderson of Salem, Wisconsin; 
1 brother, Theodore Palcczny of Chicago; 4 sisters, 
Cclia Machniak of Chicago, Lcona (Jack) Royer of Oak 
Lawn, Julia Pokrzywa of Chicago, Helen Walczak of 
Elmhurst and Sophia Javorskl of Bridge view; 6 grand- 
children. 

Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. Friday, April 19, 
1996 at the Strang Funeral Home, 1055 Main SL (Rte. 

03) Antioch. Rev. KurtGamlln officiated. Interment wms 
in Hillside Cemetery, Antioch. Those dcsslring may 
make contributions to Hospice of NX Illinois, 410 S. 
Hager, Barrington, In her memory. 

Daniel J. Miller, 

Age 74, of Spring Grove passed away suddenly April 
13, 1996 at Franklin Hospital in Benton, Illinois. He was 
bom December 15, 1921 in Mitchell, South Dakota the 
son of Jacob and Lcnora Smith Miller. He was married to 
Theresa Condon on October 10, 1945 in Richmond, 
Illinois. He was a graduate of Richmond High School in 
1940. He was a petroleum salesman for McHenry FS. for 
over 38 years, retiring in 1981. He was a member of 
McHenry County Farm Bureau since 1944. Dan was a 
member of St Peter Catholic Church in Spring Grove 
where he served as usher for over 45 years. He was a 
member of the Holy Name of St. Peter and the Catholic 
Order of Foresters. He was presently a corporate officer 
of D & D Milter Inc. of Waukcgan. He was a member of 
the Spring Grove Fire Protection District since 1949, 
serving as chief from 1968 to 1970 and trustee from 1970- 
1977. He was a trustee of the Village of Spring Grove for 
over 24 years. 

Survivors Include his wife, Theresa; 2 daughters, Peggy 
Miller of Atlanta, Georgia, Ciindy (John) Krausen of 
Alpharetta, Georgia; 2 sons, Gary (Bonnie) Miller of 
Richmond, Don (Klmberiy) Miller of Antioch; 7 grand- 
children, Brad, Eric, and Amy Miller, Kiel Ashley, and 
Sarah Krausen, Kia Miller; great grandson, Justin Milter 
sister, Verna (Dennis) Schmltt of McHenry; 3 brothers, 
Rich (Joyce) Miller of Twin Lakes, Wisconsin, Wayne 
(Evie) Miller of Trevor and Earl (Sonia) Miller of Spring 
Grove. He was preceded In death bya daughter, Carolyn; 
sister, Marion; brother, Forrest 

Funeral mass was at 10:30 a.m Tucsd ay, April 16, 1996 
at St Peter Church in Spring Grove. Rev. Andrew Pleasa 
officiated. Interment was at St Peter Church Cemetery 
In Spring Grove. Visitation was from 3-8 p.m. Monday at 
Ehorn-Adams Funeral Home in Richmond. Memorials 
may be made In his name the American Lung 
Association. 

Bennie Peterson, 

Age 83 passed away Thursday, April 1 1, 1996 at St 
Catherine's Hospital. He was born February 13, 1913 in 
Viroqua the son of the late Albert and Aletta (Larsen) 
Peterson. He attended Viroqua schools and graduated 
from Viroqua High School In 1932. During World War II 
he served 33 months with the Coastal Artillery, during 
which he spent 16 months in Greenland. On October 
19, 1940 he married Anils Toft in Christ Episcopal 
Church, Waukegan. He was employed for 10 years as a 
retail shoe salesman in Eau Claire and Waukegan. For 
28 years, he was a representative for John Hancock 
Insurance, and served as assistant district manager for 
the Kenosha branch during that time. He retired In 
1974. He was an active member of Trinity Lutheran 
Church, he had been both a Sunday School teacher for 
many years as well as serving several terms on the 



church council. A member and past president of the 
Life Underwriters Association, he was a member of 
Junker-Ball VFW Post 1865, a member of Kenosha 
Lodge 47, F & AM, Friends of Carthage College and an 
active member and former treasurer of Brotherhood 
Lodge 14, where he assisted new member in orienta- 
tion and Danish Brotherhood Insurance. He volun- 
teered at Kenosha Hospital and Medical Center, Senior 
Citizens and Kenosha County Senior Citizens. 

Survivors include his wife; a son, James P. In San 
Diego, California; daughter, Janice M. Lawell of 
Nccnah; 2 sisters, Jerre Carlson of Stoughton and Helen 
Walby of Viroqua; 5 grandchildren. He was preceded In 
death by 5 brothers, Emmett Kenneth, Lcland, Amcr, 
and Arlo; sister, Louise Amodt 

Funeral services were held on Monday April 15, 1996 
at 11 .m. from Tirnity Lutheran Church, Kenosha. 
Interment followed in Hiskory Union Cemetery. 
Memorial remembrances may be made to Trinity 
Lutheran Church, Hospice Alliance, Danish 
Brotherhood Lodge #14 or American Cancer Society. 
The Hansen Funeral Home is serving the family., 

Robert J. Lindquist, 

Age 59, of Antioch, passed away Sunday, April 14, 
1996 suddenly at his home. He was born May 2, 1936 In 
Carpcntcrsvillc the son of Glenn and Beulah (Gerkc) 
Lindquist moving to Antioch in 1963. He was a member 
of St Ignatius Episcopal Church of Antioch, Director of 
the Fox Waterway Agency of the Chain of Lakes and was 
Chairman of the Safety Committee, member and past 
president of the Northern Illinois Conservation Club 
and was very active in the Annual Ice Fishing Derby 
and Fund Raising, Volunteer Worker for the Illinois 
Dcpt of Conservation and active in raising and planti- 
ng of fish in the Chain of Lakes, member of Muskies 
Inc., North of the Border Chapter, member of Scquoit 
Masonic Lodge #827 AF. and AM. and the 885 Civic 
Club and ScotUsh Rite, past member of the Antioch 
Lions Club. Bob had worked as a Service Technician for 
Northern Illinois Gas Co., for 39 years retiring in 1994. 
On June 14, 1958 he married Phyllis J. Hotmen In 
Dundee. 

Survivors include his wife, Phyllis; 2 daughters, 

Christine Lindquist and Shcrrle (Thomas) Geislcr botfi 
or Antioch; mother, Beulah Lindquist of Hampshire; 2 
grandchildren, Bradley and Brianne Geislcr or Antioch; 
4 brothers, Bruce (Kay) of Gary, North Carolina, Richard 
(Marge) ofW. Dundee, Kenneth (Phyllis) of Hampshire 
and Keith (Donna) of Algonquin; 1 sister, Carol (Bob) 
Taylor of Kansas City, Kansas. He was preceded in death 
by his father, Glenn Lindquist 

Funeral services with Mass of Christian Burial were 
held at 1 p.m. Wednesday, April 17, 1996 at St Ignatius 
Episcopal Church, 977 Main St, Antioch. Reverend 
Vincent Eckholm officiated. Private interment was In 
Hillside Cemetery, Antioch. Arrangements were by the 
Strang Funeral Home, 1055 Main St, Antioch. Those 
desiring may make contributions to St Ignatius 
Episcopal Church, In his memory. 

Jane H. Poll, 

Age 69, of McHenry passed away April 13, 1996 at her 
home. She was bom August 26, 1926 in Chicago to 
Henry and Lcona (nee Todt) Hanson. Resident of 
McHenry since 1953, formerly of Chicago. Employed 
with the Zicglcr Plumbing Company for 15 years as a 
receptionist 

Survivors include her husband, Louis J. Poll whom 
she married on January 12, 1952 in Chicago; daughter, 
Deborah (Scott) Gordon of Tucson, Arizona; son, John 
(Luann) Poll of Lake Villa; 2 grandchildren, Jeffrey and 
Jennifer Gordon of Tucson; 2 sisters, Grace Hanson of 
Austin, Texas and Gladys (Patrick) McNally of Mesa, 
Arizona; many nieces and nephews. She was preceded 
in death by her parents. 

Burial was private. Memorials may be made in the 
name of Jane to the Hospice Foundation of 
Northeastern Illinois, 410 South Hager Avenue, 
Barrington, 60010. Funeral arrangements made by the 
George R. Justen and Son Funeral Home, 3519 West El m 
Street McHenry. 

Lottie Kent (nee Golemba), 

Age 82, of Round Lake Beach for 37 years and for- 
merly of Chicago passed away on Wednesday, April 10, 
1996 In her home. She was born on November 2, 1913 
to Frank and Mary Golemba (nee Wanat). She was 
employed with the Great Lakes Naval Base in Great 
Lakes as an accountant for 18 years before her retire- 
ment She was a member of St Josephs Catholic 
Church, Round Lake where she was an avid Bingo 
player. 

Survivors Include her loving daughter, Judy Kent of 
Round Lake Beach; 3 granddaughters, Dcbra (Thomas) 
Wallace of Inglcsldc, Sharon (Chuck) Halstead of 
Spring Grove and Sandra (Vlncc) Janus of Lindenhurst; 
1 great granddaughter, Mailory Susan Halstead. She is 
preceded in death by her parents, Frank and Mary 
Golemba and her husband, Joseph F. Kent in 1979. 

Visitation was from 5-9 p.m. on Friday, April 12, 1996 
at Justen's Round Lake Funeral Home, 222 N. Rosedale 
Ct, Round Lake. Mass was at 9:30 a.m. on Saturday, 
April 13, 1996 at St Joseph's Catholic Church, 114 N. 
Lincoln Ave., Round Lake. Interment was in Ascension 
Cemetery, Libertyvillc. 
See OBITS page C4 



■ 




CLASSIFIED LAldANd Newspapers Apnil 19, 1996 



From page C3 
Lydia M. Schwartz, 

Age 98, or Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
passed away Tuesday, April 9, 1996 at the 
Wisconsin Lutheran Care Center of 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She was bom 
March 7, 1898 In Milwaukee, the daughter 
of the late Pastor Albert and Marie 
(Kretzschmar) Pankow. Mrs. Schwartz 
attended Northwestern College from 
where she taught In luthcran schools In 
Water town, Wisconsin, SL Paul, 
Minnesota, Wauwatosa and Kenosha, 
Wisconsin. She retired In 1959 after four 
more years of teaching in Morton Grove. 
She was a member of Faith Evangelical 
Lutheran Church. of Antioch. On August 
19, 1924 she married John E. Schwartz 
and he preceded her in death on August 1, 
1954. 

Survivors include 4 children, John A. 
(Judy) of Kenosha, Wisconsin, Melvin of 
Bristol, Wisconsin, loan (Jim) Campbell 
of Las Vegas, Nevada and Clifford (Joyce) 
of Morton Grove; sister-in-law, Frieda 
Schwartz of Ashippun, Wisconsin; 12 
grandchildren; 23 great grandchildren. 
Besides her husband, she was preceded In 
death by 3 brothers and 4 sisters. 

Funeral services were held at 12:30 a.m. 
Saturday, April 13, 1996 at Faith 
Evangelical Lutheran Church, 1275 Main 
St., Antioch. Pastor Da raid Gruen officiat- 
ed. Interment was at Sunset Ridge 
Memorial Park, Kenosha, Wisconsin. 
Arrangements were by the Strang Funeral 
Home, Antioch. Those desiring may make 
contributions .to the Church or the 
Wisconsin Lutheran Care Center, 6800 N. 
76th St, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 53223 in 
her memory. 

Robert A. Engel, 

Age 39, of Lake Villa passed away 
Saturday, April 3, 1996 at SL Thcrcsc 
Medical Center in Waukcgan. He was 
born February 16, 1957 in Chicago. He has 
been a resident of Lake Villa for the past 2 
years formerly of Gages Lake. Mr. Engel 
was employed by Underwriters 
Laboratories in Northbrook for the past 2 
years. He was also a member of the VFW 
Post #4308 of Lake Villa and a member of 
the National Athletic Club in Fox Lake. 

Survivors Include his wife, Karen (nee 
Anderson); step daughter, Headier (Sean) 
Dlllard of Norfolk, Virginia; step son, Lcs 
Piffner of Jonesboro, Georgia and a 
granddaughter, Victoria Dillard of 
Norfolk, Virginia; mother-in-law, Darlenc 
Anderson of Ingtcside, sister-in-law, 
Sharon (John) Barnard of Inglcsidc, and 
brother-in-law, Ken (Anne) Anderson of 
Jonesboro, Georgia; several nieces and 
nephews. He is preceded in death by his 
parents. 

Memorial services were held at I p.m. 
Friday, April 19, 1996 at the Strang Funeral 
Chapcl,LTD., 410 E. Belvldere Rd, 
Grayslakc. Rev. James Connor from the 
United Protestant Church of Grayslakc 
officiated. Memorials may be made to the 
American Cancer Society. 

Mae Janssen, 

Age 75, of McHenry for the past 9 years 
and a longtime resident of Fox Lake 
passed away Thursday, April 11, 1996 at 
the N.I.M.C. in McHenry. She was born In 
Alabama on December 25, 1921. She was 
a former member of the Fox Lake 
Community Church and was always 
active in the Shady Lane Grade School 
and the Grant Community High School 
P.TA's and was also actively involved with 
Cub Scouting. She was also a member of 
the Fox Lake Moose Lodge. 

Survivors include 3 sons, John (Donna) 
Jansscn of Colorado, William "Bill" 
(Annie) Janssen of Vernon Hills, Craig 
(Dorothy) Janssen of McHenry; 1 sister, 
Lucille Juht of Florida; 7 grandchildren 
and 3 great grandchildren; former hus- 
band, William Janssen of McHenry as well 
as many friends. She was preceded in 
death by 1 sister, Betty and a granddaugh- 
ter, April Janssen. 

Visitation was held on Monday, April 15, 
1996 at the K.K. Hamsher Funeral Home, 
12 N. Plstakee Lake Rd., Fox Lake (The 
Chapel On The Lake) where funeral ser- 
vices were conducted. Reverend Manuel 
officiated. Burial followed at Grant 
Cemetery, Inglcsidc. Memorials may be 
made to the Janssen family in lieu of flow- 
ers. 

Carl J. Schilling, 

Age 77, of Lake Villa and businessman 
for over 35 years, formerly of Chicago 
passed away. at the Lake Forest Hospital, 
Tuesday, April 9, 1996. He was born In 
Chicago on June 2, 1918 to Carl and Anna 
(Cleslak) Schilling. He was the former 
owner of Schillings Service Station in 



Chicago and in Fox Lake on Grand and 
Rollins Rd., was a veteran having served 
in the U.S. Army during WWII a member 
of the Fox Lake American Legion Post 703, 
a former member of the Moose Lodge In 
Chicago and the Fox Lake Lions Club. He 
was a member of St. Dcdc's Catholic 
Church and a 3rd degree member of the 
K.O.C. 

Survivors include his wife, Harriet 
(Murphy) Schilling (nee Ward) of Lake 
Villa; 3 step-daughters, Kim Pollkan of 
Chesney Shores of Lake Villa, Joyce (Rich) 
Hcncbcrry of Deep Lake Shore, Lake Villa, 
and Cathy Murphy of Deep Lake Shores, 
Lake Villa; 9 step grandchildren; uncle to 
4. He was preceded in death by his first 
wife, Virginia "Jean* Schilling (nee Ryhka) 
and by a sister, Virginia. 

A memorial mass was celebrated in 
Carl's memory at 6 p.m. Friday, April 19, 
1996 at St. Dcdc's Catholic Church, 5 
Wdson Rd, Ingleside. The family Invited 
all to attend a dinner following mass. In 
lieu of floors, the family would appreciate 
memorials to the Lake Forest Hospital 
Hospice, 660 N. Westmorland Rd, Lake 
Forest, Illinois 60045 or to a charity of 
your choice. 

Thomas S. Griffin Sr., 

Age 81, of McHenry formerly of Antioch 
and Chicago passed away Saturday, April 
13, 1996 at the Northern Illinois Medical 
Center, McHenry. He was born August 20, 
1914 in Chicago the son of the late 
Maurice and Mary (Geary) Griffin. Tom 
had lived at the Indian Point Area of Grass 
Lake, Antioch for many years moving to 
McHenry in 1981. He was a member of SL 
Peter Church and the Loyal Order of 
Moose Lodge #525 of -Antioch. Tom 
retired in 1976 as a Maintenance 
Mechanic for the Great Lakes Naval Base 
where he had worked for over 25 years. 
On January 20, 1940 he married Helcnc 
Pcderson In Chicago and she preceded 
him in death on September 25, 1981. 

Survivors Include 3 children, Joanne 
(Ron) Kauffman of Wildwood, Thomas 
Griffin Jr., of Galena, and Maureen (Gary) 
Pospichel of McHenry; 3 brothers, Dennis 
(Edith) Griffin of Downers Grove, 
Raymond Griffin of Rockford and Rev. 
James Griffin CMF of Prcscott, Arizona; 
11 grandchildren; 11 great grandchildren. 
Besides his parents and his wife, he was 
preceded in death by 1 grandson, Thomas 
J. Griffin and 3 brothers, John, Frank, and 
Maurice. 

Funeral services with Mass of Christian 

Burial was held at 10:00 a.m. Wednesday, 

April 17, 1996 at SL Peter Church, 557 

Lake SL, Antioch. Private interment was 

held at Hillside Cemetery. Arrangements 

were handled by the Strang Funeral 

Home, 1055 Main SL (Rte. 83), Antioch. 

Loyal Order of Moose Services were held 

at the funeral home at 7 p.m. In lieu of 

flowers, donations may be made to the 

Grccnwing Youth Division of Ducks 

Unlimited, P.O. Box 614, Antioch, Illinois, 

60002, in his memory. 

Iila M. Henning, 

Age 46, of Endeavor passed away 
Tuesday, April 9, 1996 at the University of 
Wisconsin Hospital in Madison following 
a courageous battle with cancer. She was 
born on September 17, 1949 in Kenosha, 
Wisconsin to Leslie W. and LaVcrne E. 
(Schultz) Perry. After attending AnUoch 
High School, she was united in marriage 
with John E. Hcnntng at Lake Villa In 1968. 
He preceded her in death in 1976. In 1978, 
Llla was united in marriage with Edward 
H. Henning in Montello, Wisconsin. Lila 
was a woman who did not use her illness 
as an excuse or a crutch. She lived each 
day devoting herself to three children and 
her grandson. She was a person who did 
not take from others but rather gave her- 
self to them. She will be sadly missed by 
all who knew her. 

Survivors include her husband, Edward 
Henning of Endeavor; 3 children, Dawn 
(Jerry) Bush of Pardcevillc, Michelle 
(Louis Natoli) Henning of Ml Klsco, New 
York, John (Melissa Gammctcr) Henning 
of Portage; grandson, Tyler Bush; 4 sisters, 
Pat (Clayton) Krahn of Kenosha, Francis 
Kastcn of Spooncr, Sarah Bullamorc of 
Kenosha, Mary (Jack) Williams of Lucas, 
Kansas; 2 brothers, Art (Irene) Perry of 
Olympia, Washington, Rich Perry of 
Cullmcn, Alabama. She was preceded In 
death by her parents, 1 sister, Shirley 
Wilkinson; 3 brothers, Robert L Perry, 
Donald Perry and Wayne Belcher. 

Funeral services were held Friday, April 
12, 1996 at 1:30 p.m. at Strang Funeral 
Home, Antioch. Reverend Jospch P Howe 
officiated. Burial was at the Hickory 
Union Cemetery In AnUoch. Arragements 
were handled by the Port-Axtell Funeral 
Home in Portage. 



DeatIh NoTicES 



HENDRICKSON 

Leo. T. Hcndrickson, 76, of Lake Zurich. Arr: 
Alilgrim and Sons Funeral Home, Lake Zuirch. 



LecjaL 

NOTICES 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
VILLAGE OF GRAYSLAKE 
PUBLIC NOTICE/lNST TUirmONSTQ BIDDERS 
OWNER: VILLAGE OF GRAYSLAKE 

33 SOUTH WHITNEY STREET 
GRAYSLAKE, IL 60030 

1. Tlmo and Pla«i of Opening Bids . Tho Village of Grayslake 
(•Owner*) will receive soaled proposals for tho WORK doscribod 
herein a! tho Office of tho Village Manager, Village of Grayslake, 
Lake County. Illinois, until 2:00 o'clock p.m., May 17, 1996. 
Sealod proposals will bo publicly ope nod and publicly read al this 
tlmo. 

2. Doscrlpllon of Work . Tho proposod WORK consists of tho 
Installation of a now dual position radio console which will bo uti- 
lized with tho existing modular bays for rack mounted control pan- 
ols, (ho Installation of a now 50 ft. brackoled stool tower wtlh cltmb 
guard, grounding kits, four (4) antonna standoffs with four (4) 
antennas, and corresponding cables, linos, and connectors fully 
Installed. Tho WORK also consists of tho furnishing of two (2) SO 
watt base station radios. Tho WORK shall be performed on or 
around Seplombor 1996 at tho future site of the Grayslake Police 
Department, 33 S. Whitney St., Grayslake, IL 

3. Lflgal Compliance . AH Bidders must comply with applicable 
Illinois Law requiring the payment of prevailing wages by all con- 
tractors working on publicly funded projects, and Bidders must 
comply wtth tho Illinois Statutory requirements regarding labor, 
Including but not limited to the Equal Employment Opportunity 
Laws. In addition, all Bidders must comply with al other applica- 
ble federal, state, and local laws, orders, rules, and regulations. 

4. Guaranty of Proposals . A bid bond, bank cashier's check, cer- 
ttfled check, or cash In an amount not less than ffve (5) percent of 
the bid amount will be required at the time the proposal b delrv- 

orod. 

5. Obtaining Bid Packa g e . Bid Packages may be obtained Irom: 
Tho Owner, 33 South Whitney St., Grayslake, IL 60030. 

6. p rn-B'd Meeting . A non-mandalofy pro-bid meeting may be 
arranged wlh the Chief of Police to review the Installation site. 
Please call the Grayslake Police Station at (047) 223-2341 to 
arrange a mooting. 

7. Preparation of Proposals . Al proposals for the Work shall be 
made only on the Proposal forms found within the Bidding 
Documents. Each and every price Rem found In the Schedule of 
Prices section of the Bidding Documents must be completed. All 
proposals must be signed by an authorized otfldal. Bidder's 
Proposals thai contain omissions, erasures, alterations, or addi- 
tions not called tor, conditional or alternate bids unless called for, 
or that contain irregularities of any kind may be rejected. 
6. Clarifications . Bidders' questions on the Intent or meaning of 
the documents found within the Bid Package shall be In writing 
submitted to Owner. Owner win respond In writing wfih the ques- 
tion and response submitted to all Bidders as an addendum and 
made publicly available for Inspection al the village Halt. Owner 
reserves the right to make darlflcallons, conodlons, or changes 
In this Notice to Bidders al any time prior to the lime proposals are 
ope ned . All Bidders or prospe dive Bidders will be Informed of said 
daritlcatlons, corredlons, or changes. 

9. Dollverv of Proposals . Each proposal shall be submitted In a 
sealed envelope plainly marked wtlh the title of the contrad and 
Bidder's lull legal name and shall bo addressed and delivered to 
the place and before the time set forth above. Proposals may bo 
delivered by mall or In person. Proposals transmitted electronical- 
ly by fax or other similar means will not be accepted. Proposals 
received alter the tlmo specified above will be returned u nope nod. 

10. Opening of Proposals . Proposals will be publfdy ope nod and 
road at tho time and place specified above. Bidders, their autho- 
rized agents, and Interested parties are Invited to be present. 

11. Withdrawal of Proposals . No proposal shall be withdrawn for a 
period of 60 days alter the opening of any proposal. 

12. Roiodlon ol Proposals . Proposals that, are not submitted on 
the forms provided In the Bidding Documents or that are not pre- 
pared In accordance wllh tho Bidding Documents may be reject- 
ed. If not rejoded, Owner may demand corredlon of any deficien- 
cy and accept the dellclonlty prepared proposal upon compliance 
with tho Bidding Documents, 

13. Award oi Contrad , Owner reserves tho right to reject any or 
all bids, waive ail technicalities, errors, omissions, erasures, alter- 
allons, and additions not called for, and to make an award which, 
In Its judgmonl. Is tho best and most favorable to the Interests of 
Owner and the public. 

VILLAGE OF GRAYSLAKE 
By: Michael J. Elite 
Village Manager 

0496G-774-Gon 
April 19, 1996 



KOZIATEK 

Chester C. Kozialck, 78, of Lake Zurich. Arr: 
Alilgrim and Sons Funeral Home. 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
NOTICE TO BIDDERS 

LINCOLNSHIRE-PRAIRIE VIEW SCHOOL DISTRICT #103 

The Board of Education ol tho Lincolnshire- Prairie View School 
Dlstrid #103, Lake County, Lincolnshire, Illinois, wfll receive 
seated bids until 2:00 P.M. local tlmo, May 2, 1 996, In the Business 
Office, 1370 Rtverwoods Road, Lake Forest, Illinois lor tho 1096-, 
97 Operational Services to tncludo Milk, tee Cream, Fuel Oil, 
Disposal Sorvteo, Copy Paper, and Construdlon Paper. 

Al 2:00 P.M., all bids that are rocotvod will be publicly opened 
and road aloud In tho Business Office. 

AD prospodlve bidders are required to review said epedllca- 
llons and requirements prior to submitting their bid. Bid apedflca- 
tlons may be obtalnod through the Business Office, 1370 
Rtverwoods Road, Lake Forest, Illinois 60045. 

All bids must be accompanied by Certlf tealos ol Insurance and 
such other documents as required In the spoclf icallons. 

Where applicable and appropriate, the gonora) prevailing rate 
of wages In Lake County, Illinois Bhal be paid for each Craft or 
type of workman or mechanic noodod to exocuto the contrad or 
perform such work. 

Sealed bids shall be addressed to Uncotnshlro-Pralrle View 
School Dlstrid #103, Business Office, 1370 Rtverwoods Road, 
Lake Forest, Illinois 60045. 

Tho Board of Education reserves the right to accept or rojod 
any or all bids and to walvo any Informalities In bidding. 
Doris Rapinchuk, Secretary Dated this lltteenth day 

Board of Education ol April, 1996 

0496C-760-Gen 
. April 19, 1998 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
NOTICE TO BIDDERS 

LINCOLNSHIRE-PRAIRIE VIEW SCHOOL DISTRICT #103 

The Board ol Educallon of the Lincolnshire-Prairie View School 
Dlstrid #103, Lake County, Lincolnshire, Illinois, will receive 
sealed bkfs unlU 11:00 A.M. local time, May 2, 1996, in the 
Business Office, 1370 Rtverwoods Road, Lake Forest, lllnob for 
Classroom Chairs. 

At 1 1 :00 A.M., an bids that are received will be publicly opened 
and read aloud In the Business Office. 

Al prospodlve bidders are required to review sakJ specifica- 
tions and requirements prior to submitting their bid. Bid soedllca- 
tlons may be obtained through the Business Office, 1370 
Rlverwoods Road, Lake Forest, Illinois 60045. 

AB bids must be accompanied by Certlf teales of Insurance and 
such other documents as required In the specifications. 

Where applicable and appropriate, tho general prevallng rate 
of wages in Lake County, Illinois shall be paid lor each Craft or 
type of workman or mechanic needed to execute the contrad or 
perform such work. 

Sealed bids shall be addressed to Uncolnshire-PraJrte View 
School Dlstrid #103, Business Office, 1370 Rtverwoods Road, 
Lake Forest, Illinois 60045. 

The Board ol Education re servos, tho right to accept or rejed 
any or al bkfs and to waive any Informalities In bidding. 
Doris Rapinchuk, Secretary Dalod this lltteenth day * 

Board of Education of April, 1996 

0496C-781-Gen 
April 19, 1996 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS 

REBID 

FOR 

VILLAGE OF ANTIOCH METRA STATION 

SEALED BIDS will be received by the VlHago of Antioch at 874 

Main Street, Antioch, IL 60002 until May 6,. 1996 at 2:00 p.m. al 

which lime and place all such bids win bo opened publicly and 

read aloud for the following: 

A 2ff x 40" Melra Train Station (or the Village ol Antioch 
Al bids must be made only on the forms provided by Clark 
Dietz, Inc. and must be made In accordance wlh this Imlalton tor 
Bids, and other Contrad Documents, ail ol which are on file and 
available for examination at the above address and are mado a 
part ol ihis notice as though fully set forth herein. 

Each bid must be accompanied by a bid deposit ol 10% ol the 
base bid price In tho form of a cashier's check, certified check or 
bid bond. The successful bidder will be required to submit pay- 
ment and performance bonds In an amount equal to the total 
value of the award. There will be a plan lee ol $75.00 tor each set 
of plans and specifications. For an additional $15.00 plans and 
specifications can be mailed. The plans and specifications can be 
obtained by contacting Clark Dietz, Inc., 4235 Green Bay Road, 
Kenosha, Wl 53144, 414-657-1550. The plans and spedlicalions 
must be picked up al the above address, and are available 
Monday thru Friday, botween the hours of 6:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. 
Bidder entering Into a contrad for the work shall comply wtlh 
Iho "Preference to Citizens (Illinois) on Public Works Projod Ad' 
(Illinois Revised Statutes, Chapter 48, Sedlon 269 through 275) 
and tho Wages ol Employees on Public Works (ProvalDng Wago 
Ad) (Illinois revised Stalules, Chapter 48, Sedlon 39s-1 el soq). 
Not less than prevailing rate of wages as found by the village 
of Antioch or Ihe Department of Labor or determined by the Court 
of Revkiw shall be paid to all laborers, workmen and mechanics 
performing work undor this contrad. This Is a community projod. 
Tho Village of Antioch encourages the use of local sub contractors 
and labor. 

Requests for any chango In the Contrad Documents must be 
received no taler than seven (7) calondar days prior to the sched- 
uled date lor bid opening, Those chango requests must be direct- 
ed in writing to Clark Dietz, Inc., 4235 Green Bay Road, Kenosha. 
Wl 53144. 

Tho village of Antioch reservos the right to accept any bid or 
any part or parts thereof or to rojod any and all bids. 

village ol Antioch 
By Marilyn Shlneflug 

0496C-786-Gen 
April 19, 1996 






I 



E /W I N 

THE NEW AREA 

AREA I 



COD E FOR OUR 

S (847) 









Apnillf, 1996 UblANd Newspapers CLASSIFIED, 



m. 






t 



It 

3 

rs 

» 
d- 
,1- 
a. 

or 



on 

93 






'■■: 




IFIED 



GUIDE 

Announcements 

:■ -.-.•.- •■.■.•.*.:*,■ ■.■.v.'.-.-.-. .•-■■•-■■ y»K . .v-*, , .'.«^^.'. '»>.*.■.■ >.■ -> - •.- ■.■/,•.->'--.•:.:*:■;. .:.x-;-:-"-'-'- :■>'■:-: v:-y ■;■;■:■ yoyly^ 

Notices , , „.„iio 

Lost &Found ,.„ 1(5 

Free '.....120 

Personals ;, „ , 125 

Auctions 130 

Business Personals J35 

Financial , 140 

ElVlployMEfNT 

Help Tan ted I Part-Time. ...;„........'..,„..™...........„„219 

Help Wanted Full-Time 220 

Employnxnl Agencies , ..„, 221 

Business Opportunities , 225 

Situations Wanted ,.„ .„. ........228 

Child Care 240 

School/Instruction „ :....„ , 250 

"M Market Guide 

Antiques „ „ 301 

Appliances .„ , 304 

Barter/Trade .„.,.„„ 308 

BazaarsACrafls , , 310 

Building Materials 314 

Business/Office Equipment 318 

ElcclronJcs/Computers....,.«...„.».;.„ „ „ .....320 

Farm Guide „ 324 

Firewood „.„,. „... , 328 

Garage/Rummage Sales .„ „. ...,J30 

Good Things to Eat. , „ 334 

Horses* Tack „ 338 

Hoiisehold<k)ods/Furnltiire.. „,., „ „ „ ,-.„.340 

Jewelry. „ „„. „.„„„,..„ 344 

lawn/Garden ;. „,.. 348 

Miscellaneous „.„ „,......, „ „350 

Medical Equlp/Suppiles 354 

Musical Instruments „ ;.. 358 

Pels & Supplies „ „360 

Restaurant Equipment „ 364 

Tools & Machinery. .......... 368 

Wanted To Buy. 370 

ReaI Estate 

Homes For Sale „ 500 

Homes For Rent . „.„, 504 

Homes Wanted... „ 508 

Homes Builders ,.„.,., „.,.510 

Condo/Town Homes , ,-. 514 

Mobile Homes.... 518 

Apartments For Rent „ .,,,.520 

Apartments Wanted „ „„,..„ ,...,.„ 524 

Apt/Homes To Share .,..„ „ ..„.„.... 528 

Rooms For Rent....... „ „„.„ „..„..,„ 530 

Buildings „ .„ 533 

Business Property For Sale. „ „ 534 

Business Property For Rent.. ...538 

Investment Property 540 

Mortgage Services ..-.„„.„.„ „ 544 

Vacant Lots/Acreage „ 560 

Resorts/Vacation Rentals ,. , ....564 

Out of Area Property 568 

Cemetery Lob ..570 

Real Estate Wanted..... „ 574 

Real Estates Mlsc 578 



m 



RECREATIONAL 



Recreational Vehicles..., „ „ 704 

Snowmobile/ATVs 708 

Boals/Molors/Etc. 710 

Camping.., „ ....714 

Travel/Vacation ,. .........718 

Sports Equipment. ..720 

Airplanes 724 

;.'■: •:•/;..-:•■••.:.■•: ':•:••';; . , ■■'•?■•'■:-■■■■.■■:■'■:■■'■■.;. ,. : : ■:.'-. ::-.-.i- : ./-: ..'.•.■.•.••.:•:•:•:':• - ■■"■ •.•x*:*:W-''v -•' 

Transportation 

Cars For Sale.... ^ 804 

Rental/Leases ....808 

Classic/Antique Can - 810 

Service* Parts - 814 

Car Loans/Insurance.. «... 818 

"rTlTii i • iii iniiiii n i inT'ii n 1 1 — t ~ • 1 1 • i 1 * i\£*i 

rOlif WDGC1 l/nVC/JGCpS tllitlMHIIHtlimiM H«HHHPtltMI*MtlMt«lOb5 

Trucks/TraJlers. ....... „ 834 

Heavy Equipment.. - 838 

Motorcycles 844 

Wanted To Buy...„ 848 



^■SffiSv: 



Service Directory 



Appliances Repair -.... - S03 

Blacktop S06 

Builders S09 

Carpentry ; S12 

Carpet Cleaning :...S15 

Concrcte/CemenL... S18 

Dry Wall . S21 

EducaUon/lnstructlon S24 

Electrical ,. S27 

Firewood . S30 

Handyman SJ3 

Heatlng/AIr Conditioning S36 

Housekeeping S39 

Landscaping . S42 

Laundry/Cleaning .S45 

Legal Services S48 

Medical Services S5 1 

Moving/Storage , • S54 

PainrJng/Dccoratlng S57 

Para Legal/Typing Services. , S60 

Plumbing S63 

Pools S66 

Pressure Washing ......S69 

Professional Services S72 

Radlo/IV Repair... S75 

Remodeling. S7B 

Resumes..,.. SSI 

Rcwflngtfldlng S84 

Storage S87 

Tax Service SpO 

Trees/Plants S93 

Wedding. „. S?6 

Miscellaneous Services ;. S99 



disTRibuTioN 



Twin 
Lakes- 



•Silver Laka 



KcnoNiin 
County 

.Bristol 



Richmond 



•Spring 
Oravt 



Jortntburo 



McHtroy 



Crystal 

Laka i 

Mellonry 
County 



•Andedt 



W 



•Lite •UndMhunt 

VBtl 



•ftKLlka 

® Lite —- > N 

- Contety 



•Kenosha 



•UnHxim « 
"X 'Zlon 

(E).Wtdtwonh 



Lake 



•ItUndUk* 



•Oomat 



•North 



•Waucofldt 



Bwtlngtoo .{jka Zurich W Httts 



•Vttnoft IwnjWte--.,^ 



©i 



Harrington 



•WW** 

•Long 
Grow 



•UrKObuMrt 



•Palatine 



Buflalo Grove 




Highland Park ^ 



•Ocerticld 



Metra 

•-Milwaukee 
RR 



•Norlhbiook 



t'iMik t:«iiiiii t v 



Lakeland Newspapers Classifieds Appear in 13 Newspapers! 

Anlloch News-Reporter • Round Lake News • lake Zurich Enterprise • 

Lake Villa Record • Mundelein News • Warren-Newport Press • 

Grayslake Times • Fox Lake Press • Gurnee Press • Lindenhurst News • 

Vernon Hills News • Wauconda Leader • Libertyville News 



HOW TO PUCE A CUSS1FIED AD 



&S PHONE ... 




BY 
MAIL 

IN 



Call (847) 223-8161 

Lakeland Newspapers 

P.O. Box 268 
Grayslake, IL 60030 

^ PERSON ... 30 S. Whitney St. 

Grayslake 

G?3 BY FAX ... (847) 223-8810 

DEADLINES 

Direct Line Tues. 5 pm 

Classified 

Business & Private Party ..Wed. 10 am 

HOURS 

8 am - 8 pm Mon.-Thurs 

8 am - 6 pm Friday 



CLASSIFIED 




110 


Notices 



110 


Notices 



A BEAUTIFUL CHAPEL 

WEDDING In the Smokey 
Mountains, GaMlnburg'B Little 
Log Chapel. Charming, rustic. 
Borders national park. A 
dream wedding to lit your 
budget. 1-800-554-1451. 



Round Lake 

Lioness 
Spaghetti 

Dinner 

Sunday, April 2 1 st 

4- 7pm 
Frigates, Ingles id e 

$4 Adults 

$2.50 Kids 

|to benefit the blind & needyl 



BROADEN YOUR WORLD 
WITH SCANDINAVIAN, EU- 
ROPEAN, SOUTH AMERI- 
CAN, ASIAN, RUSSIAN HIGH 
SCHOOL EXCHANGE STUD- 
ENTS ARRIVING IN AUGUST. 
BECOME A HOST FAMILY 
AISE. CALL 1-600-SIBUNG. 

PIANO LESSONS 

Affordable Instruction for 

Children and AduRs. 

Lessons Tailored to 

Student Interests. 

FIRST LESSON FREE. 

For Details Cat 

(847) 249-5800 

evenings. 



l_AkElAl\d 

CUssifiEds 

Get the Job Done! 

CaU 227,8161 



i 



.................;.....;.....i 



USH YOUK 

1 ADV£«T,$ING £ 

I DOLLARS WISRY! I 



3 PREPRINTED INSERTS £ 

IN: 

I Lakeland I 

Newspapers 

Maximize your advertising by placing C 
pre-printed inserts in the Lakeland * 
Newspapers. Lakeland's 13 local * 
newspapers reach Lake and McHenry ■* 
Counties and Southern Wisconsin, 
with over 50,000 subscribers and 
200,000 readers weekly! 

TO HEAR MORE ABOUT THIS 

SERVICE AND SPECIAL PRICING 

CALL: 

Karen or Greq 



N 



847 225 8161 Ext. 112 or 110 '• 



• ata*a*tt«t»atali*aa*ia»*ait«ta 



» 



115 



Lost & Found 



120 



Free 



DID YOU FIND Somoonos 
PET or Special Lost Article? 
Call Lakeland Newspapers 
Classifieds DepL, and gel 
your results, FOUND «ds 
are RUN FREE of Charge, 
Call (708)223-8181. 



REMINDER... 
THE NEW AREA CODE fOR OUR 
■; -AREA IS (047) - 



WE DO NOT KNOWINGLY 
ACCEPT ADS FOR ANI- 
MALS IN OUR 

FREE/GIVEAWAY COL- 
UMN. For more Information, 
please contact the Humane 
Society. ' 

FREE QUEEN SIZE mat- 
tress and box spring. Excellent 
condition. Must come and re- 
move It. (847) 838-3810. 



115 



Lost & Found 



FREE PICK-UP SERVICE 
I win haul away your unwantec 
row boat, canoe, outboarc 
motors, or fishing gear FREE. 
Call (847) 568-2819 after 
5:30pm. 

ARE YOU SPRING CLEAN- 
ING?? GET RID OF THE 
CLUTTER AND RUN A FREE 
or GIVEAWAY Ad In the 
Lakeland Classifieds. Free 
and Giveaways are run at 
NO CHARGE! (We discour- 
age any pet ads). Deadlines: 
10am Wednesdays. (708) 
223-8161. axt.140. 



125 


Pcrsotuls 



A BABY TO LOVE. Affection- 
ate, funiovfng couple, celebrat- 
ing 10 years of a happy and 
supportive marriage, enjoy Ife 
and want to share wth your 
baby our love, enthusiasm 
and sense of humor. Your 
baby would be a most wanted 
and welcome addition to our 
Ives. Call Bobbie & David (cc4- 
ted) (847) 934-1175 anytime. 

A BRIGHT FUTURE filled 
with lots of love and laughter, 
happy days spent with family 
and friends, and al the best 
we can offer awal your chBd. 
Our hearts are ready to adopt 
a baby to shower with love. Let 
us help, Cal Rick and Julia 1- 
800-718-9701. 

ADOPTION 
A DECISION OF LOVE 

WE WERE BOTH 
ADOPTED AS INFANTS 

and know what a loving 
sacrifice our birth mothers 

made for us. We are 

ETERNALLY GRATEFUL 

We're wafting with open arms 

to welcome our famR/a 1st 

grandchild. Please help our 

dreams come true. 

Medical, legal, counseling. 

and court approved living 

expenses paid. 

Info confidential. 

Please call our attorney al 

(708) 957-6196. 

ADOPTION 

AN UNSELFISH LOVE. 

Loving family seeks to adopt 

newborn. We love sports, 

nature and the outdoors. 

We can provide a loving 

home, a good education and a 

lifetime of love & happiness. 

Call collect Mike & Dfanne 

(708) 894-6806. 

ADOPTION RN Mom & En- 
gineer Dad, with lots of lovo, 
longing to make our family 
complete by adopting an Inf- 
ant. Financially secure. Please 
give us and your baby a 
chance. Call us anytime at 1- 
800-490-2122, or our attorney 
at 1-800-241-5384. Medical 
and legal fees paid. 

ADOPTION SERVICES, A 

non-profit, licensed agency la 
placing healthy U.S. and 
Chinese Infants. Short wait , No 
restrictions or I Imitations. 1- 
800-943-0400. 

ADOPTION: LOVING FAM- 
ILY WISH TO ADOPT YOUR 
NEWBORN. EXPENSES PAD. 
CALL ANYTIME JACKIE & 
JOHN AT 1 •800-927-8668. 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



anna 



mm 



125 


Personals 



125 



Personals 



LOSE WEIGHT 

BEFORE SUMMER! 

Lose up to 30lbs. , 

30 day $$$-back guarantee. 

100% Natural. 

Dr. Recommended. 

FREE SAMPLES. 

CaU Melody (847) 548-4191, 



REMINDER... 

THE NEW AREA CODE FOR OUR 

AREA IS (847) 



NEEDED 100 PEOPLE who 
are SERIOUSLY Interested 
In losing 5-100R». for as IRtlo 
as $33/monlh. All natural, 
100% guaranteed. If you dorrt 
need to lose weight, please 
show this to someone you 
care about who does!. Call 
(847)689-8806. 

WORKS LIKE MAGIC 

Lose up to 30fbs. 

In 30 days 

Starts at $30. 

Cal (601) 350-9765. 



130 



Auctions 



130 



Auctions 



JWeii mx |Btj Jitcjleitrg tUrafcmg (Smnpmtg 

SUNDAY. APM T, 28. 1996 . 11r30 A.M. - PREVIEW 0:00 A l^f, 
CoDWoti rf the atttc of Hull St&Mt&ta ft odwr Smill Emus. Sale win be held *) 
AUCTION CENTER oa RL 3 IN. halfway between McHenry A Richirood, IU 
WATCH FOR SIGNS . TWO AUCTION ttnyft ff 

qLTNfr Anschutz 22 c. mdJ. 64S, Enfield Mark III 303, 8 mm Mmscr 
radl. 98. Moss 12 ga. mdl. 5500, Browning 12 gi mdl. A-5, MaiuerCarl 
Gusta/'s 1903, Win. mdl. 1500 XTR 12 ga., Ran. 870 mag. 12 ga. US 
mdl. 1917 Win. Sporter 304)6, Moss 12 ga, mdl. 200K, 9 mm Cobray 
M-ll, 2-Colt New Svc. (1-455 cEIcy &. 1-45 long), Makarov 9 mm, 44 
mag Ruger, Nambu, Ruger 22 c. & Ruga- 357 w/holsters, Uberti 357 
mdl. 1873, Colt 25 c. auto.. Win. mdl. 1886-33 c, German dagger, 
misc. knives, bayonets & lg. quan. of gun books & magazines GUNK 
WlLLBRSOt.DAT?P.M. HORSE DRAWN TTRMS- OUver mdL40 



plow, Sulky cart, Jerald jogging cart. Slat bottom buckboard. Railway 
depot wagon, old fire cut, wood wheel racing sulky, wagon, buggy RR 
cart & implement wheels. ANTIQUES A COLL: Quills, tapestries, Vic 
bedspreads, rockers, (1920's setee, chair, rocker, stool & ashtraya), 
dropleai tbl., chairs, lamps, pictures, oak drafting tbl. from dig. stock- 
yards, kraut cutler, potato planter, zither, violin, banjo, aled, crocks, 
jugs, chum, lanterns, sterling silver jewelry, photo albums, mantle 
clocks, games, books (Germ. St child), dolls, old gas street light, cast 
iron dogs, mixing bowls, china, depress/carnival glass, 2-3x5 oriental 
rugs, dresser doll, old bats, camera, Rockwell cups, figurines, Dixie 
Dogwood-Wedgewood-German & English china, Limoges - Cusick- 
Capodimonte-Lofton-OC/Japan &. Nippon items. Hummel plates, Corgi 
bus. FURN. &. MISC. : Old oak office desk, hutch, dresser, chest, bdrm. 
set, VCR, speakers, Coca-Cola trays, Singer s/m, steel gun cab., din. set, 
shop vac, nail gun, wood skiis, router/plane, garden tools, heaters, 
records, books, old typewriter, exercise bike, childrens merry-go-round, 
8' truck camper cover. Two wagon loads of misc. box lots. 

TERMS: Cad or CHK.W/ID T.lfNCH ON GROUNDS 

FRED LENZEN, Auctioneer - Pg. #847-536-4831 

LEE COONEY (815) 385-3100 • (815) 728-8202 

5% Buyers Premium 



140 



Rnzodal 



219 



Help Wanled 
Part-Time 



SSCASHSS IMMEDIATE 
$$ for structured settlements, 
annuities, lottery payouts, In- 
surance claims and mort- 
gages. 1-800-386-3682 J.G. 
Wentworth the nations only dl- 
rect purchaser. 



PROPERTY 

TAXPAYERS 

SAVE MONEY NOW! 

Be Sure You're Paying Only 

Your FAIR €HARE OF 

PROPERTY TAXES 

EHHES & 
ASSOCIATE $, /JVC, 

A National Property Tax 
Consulting Finn 
Specializing In: 

•Commercial 

•Industrial 

•Office 

•Apartment 
With This Ad obtain a 
FREE INITIAL 

CONSULTATION 

Call Today! 

Carl Pharr 
(847) 577-6500 



■AVON' REPRESENTA- 
TIVE NEEDED! NO DOOR- 
TO-DOOR REQUIRED. 

$100-$ 1,200+ Monthly. 

Ind/Sales/Rep, 1-800-236- 
0041. 

READ NO FURTHER! 

It's a SHAME for you qoJ to 

make good money! How to 

find work FAST/wlth the 

Federal Government. 

2 books less than $20. 

FREE OFFER! 

Call Nowl 
(847) 622-3822. _ 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

If you have placed classified 
advertising with the Lake- 
land Newspapers you may 
receive a misleading: state- 
ment from another firm re- 
questing payment for this 
advertising. To receive prop- 
er credit to your account, 
all payments for your Lake- 
land Newspapers advertising 
roust be mads as Invoiced 
and directed to: 

laktland HtwipasMs 

PO Box 268 

SO 9. WfeitMT ■*< 

Onaysfctks. IL tjooaojgjg 



m 



ii-mw^SAJIO wmft*«nMb:^Ji)(A-J i» 



IWS , 



l?J lin«A 




CLASSIFIED LaIceIancI Newspapers Apmil 19, 1996 




/ This Oat For Full & Part Time 
Summer Seasonal Opportunities 



I Pool Attendants 

needed for local 
apartment complex. 
Make $$$ while you 

get a great tan. 

| Call 708-637-0994 
■ 



LIFEGUARD 

Full lime for 

Grayslakecondo. From 

Memorial Day to Labor Day. 

Must be Red Cross certified. 

Call (047) 387-4608 



mmmmmtmmmm 



PAINTERS 

Top Pay I! 

Call Anytime 

1-800470-3243 



m i H i H i immmimmi 



I Good Peoptej 
Wanted 

Wo ere looking for p/t 
employees who love to be 
face to face with the cus- 
tomers. Taking applications 
for: Lifeguards, Weight 
Trainers, Aerobic Leaders, 
Front Desk & Building 
Supervisors. 
Complete applications at 

Lake County 
Family YMCfl 

2000 Western Ave. 
Waukegan 

360-9622 



JOIN OUR TEAM 1 

Sunset Ridge Country 
Club, Northflold currently 
has PT and FT positions 
available for: 

♦WAITERS/WAITRESSES 
'SUMMER POSITIONS 

The Club provides uni- 
forms, meals, excellent 
wages and benefits. If 
you're interested In work 
Ing with a great team, 
contact 

Mlchele Collins or 
Crista! Schepis 

847-446-5222 



219 



Hdp Wanted 
Part-Time 



PART TIMER'S 
DREAM 

Lost year I modo S 20, 000 
from home working Part 
Time. Need 3 key people. 

(847) 742-0250 



219 



HdpWiQled 
Part-Tlroc 



tmnmimmnm i mu t 



PIZZA ij 

•Delivery Person 
•Counter Person 

' [Part time, weekend evenings.; : 

Call Mace 
iii (847)566-7770 jii 
fmmuuuuuumnnm i 



JT 



Kennel Help 

Wanted 

AM. 5 day weeks. 

Creekside 
Dachshunds 

Long Grove 
(847) 07*0099 



*t SSSSSSSSSSSS 

fWork At? 



|plllllllllllllllilllllll1lllllllllllllll| 

! VET tech! 



$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
s 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 



Home 

Earn up to $339.84 

per week assembling 

our products at home. 

Amazing recorded 

message reveals 

details. Call 



I $ 



|j Experienced Person 

Part Tune 
= Also Cleaning if 
1 Experienced Person = 

5 day week 

5 hour days = 

| 815-455-9429 % 

illllltllllllllllllfllllilllllllllllllllllllr: 



(608) 836-3595 



X636 



S 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 

$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 



1 $s$$$$ss$s$s 



PUPPY DAY CARE I 

Help wanted, morning &. 

afternoon shifts. Must be 

experienced with dogs. For 

I information contact Cathie at | 

(847) 566-1960 



PART-TIME 
CAREERS 

If you are at least 26 and have 
not reached your 37th birthday you 

could qualify for a career In the 
NAVAL RESERVE. Benefits include: 

Tension Opportunities 
•Discount Shopping Privileges 
*Paid Training 
'Educational Benefits 
•Free Uniforms 
•One Weekend a Month 
•Two Week* per Year 
•NO BOOT CAMP 

This is an excellent opportunity for you 
to put your civilian experience to work. 

^>& For more IrrfofrnatioiK 

"=T Rich Hoffman 




RESERVE 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



219 



Hdp Wanted 
Part-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full Time 



220 



Help Wailed 
Pull-Timc 



220 



Help Wanted 
Pull-Timc 



| Part Time i 
I INSIDE SALES | 





FREMONT CONTRACT 

CARRIERS, Inc. of Fremont, 
NE. b looking for qualified and 
oxportoncod flatbed drivers to 
nn our now Hl-Rbo Gonvon- 
llonals. Wo offer: Homo 
EVERY wook, 401K, oxcoltont 
pay, vocation pay and quarter- 
ly bonuses. If Interested, call 
Bob Toovoy at B00-22B-9742. 



SR. MARKETING EXECS- 
THIRD Largest '95 AM EX 
gainer. Midwest Rogton-Exc. 
Compensation plan-gon. Bo- 
nuses- NO CAP. Intorvlows fn 
Chicago, Apr. 26-27. By appt. 
1-000-465-2003 Ext. 134 or 
fax resume to: 047-391-1420 
HRDopt. 



1RUCK DRIVERS NEED- 
ED to operate 4a states. No 
Canada. Haul dry freight. No 
HazMat. Excellent Pay & Ben- 
efits. Minimum 1 yr. OTR ex- 
perience. Call Continental Ex- 
press 1-800-605-4473. 



KUI OVUM 

H pleasant 
knity for a 



u working environment An excellent opportu 
students, sonlors or mothors. For more Infer 
Sjmatlon contact: 

^ Karen OToole at 



- (847)223-8161 

% EOE 



i 



GENERAL OFFICE 

Love Variety? 

Phones, Lite Comp. 

X44-O016 



perior JLcrsonnel 






DRIVERS 



Help Wanted 
Full Time 




DRIVERS-CHEYENNE EX- 
PRESS IS looking for OTR 
Van Drivers. Start up to 
28*Anlto. Paid Bonollts, Bo- 
nusos. Plenty of Freight. Good 
Home Time. Late Model 
Equipment Must bo 23 win 1 
year OTR. Cal CX/Roborson 
TODAY! 800-473-5581 EOE. 

DRIVERS-CALARK INTER- 
NATIONAL OFFERS 
GREAT PAY. BENEFITS and 
the chance to GET HOME 
MORE OFTEN! Must be 22 
with CDL and HazMat en- 
dorsemont. BOO-950-8326. 

DRIVERS-SOLO/TEAMS, 
$2,000 SIGN on. Top teams 
earn $104,000+. Top trainers 
earn 70K+. Major bonellsAno- 
tel/doadhead pay. Covenant 
Transport 800-441-4394. 
Studonls call 800-338-6428. 

DRIVERS. MIDWEST OR 
WEST COAST. NEW EQUIP- 
MENT. NO EAST COAST. 
RIDER PROGRAM AVAIL- 
ABLE. SINGLES UP TO 27 
CENTS, TEAMS UP TO 27 
CENTS, PLUS EXCELLENT 
BENEFIT PACKAGE. CALL 
G.F. LACAEYSE TRANS- 
PORT, INC. 1-800-645-3748. 

DRIVERS. POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE at U.S. Xpress 
and Southwest Motor freight. 
No experience required. Great 
pay/be no I Its, 800-870-7743. 
Minimum Investment for traln- 
Ing. EOE/M/F/WH. 

DRIVERS/OTR - TUITION 
Iree OTR driver training and a 
guaranteed Job. Job securtty, 
no lay-otls. Outstanding pay, 
benefits. CRST, Inc. 1-800- 
504-2778. EOE/mt. 

FIREFIGHTER AND EMT 

Paid on-tho-job training tor 
H.S. grads. Physically til. 
under age 34, wiling to re- 
locale out ol area. H.S. Diplo- 
ma a must. Cal 1-800-460- 
6289. 

GET HOME WEEKLY; Now 

hiring, regional opportunities. 
Midwest and East Coast. Vans 
and flats. First day health, 97% 
conventional fleet, tul bene- 
fla. WERNER ENTERPRISES. 
. 1-800-346-2818. 

GUIDE TO HOME 

EMPLOYMENT. 

Rush Si and soK-addrossed 

stamped envelope to: 

Rogers, 

B0X5216HG, 

Vernon Hills, II. 60061. 

IF YOU HAVE S-50LBS. 
TO LOSE, we have the ca- 
reer tor you! Can RK at 600- 
445-9726. 



NEEDED: CONCRETE 
FINISHERS/FORMSET- 
TERS, ptpeftttors/wetders, 
millwrights. Insulators, electri- 
cians. Health Ins., 
Vac/401K/Hoydays- 
E.O.EJDrug screen. Contact: 
Steve Laverty-(800)844-8436 
or tax resume to: (316) 37 8- 
3000, A-LERT CORPORA- 
T10N. 

OTR DRIVRSSIN- 
GLE/TEAMS J&R Schugol 
Trucking Champalgn-Urbana 
Illinois is Expanding their 
Fleet II Excellont Pay S, Bene- 
Ilts. Weekly Pay. No handing 
policy. Call and Compare. 1- 
600-350-0101. 

OWNER-OPERATORS 
RUN MIDWEST to South- 
east. Home often. Benefits 
available. Percentage Con- 
tract lor Late Model Tractors. 
Your Trailer or Mine. SUNCO 
CARRIERS 1/800-446-2864. 

OWNER/OPERATORS 
WANTED WE offer 79* per 
mile to atari. 80* per mile after 
6 months, loaded or empty. 
Why be away from homo con- 
stantly? CONTACT: Jenell 
Tripp, Interstate Express, 1- 
800-732-4554. 



DRIVERS OTR ADS $1,000 
sign-on bonus, imltod open- 
ings for experienced flaibod 
drivors. Assigned convent kwv 
als, benefits, 40 1K, and more. 
Call todayl 600-646-3438, oxt. 
1005. Ownor Operators Wel- 
come. 

DRIVERS SWIFT TRANS- 
PORTATION now hiring. Ex- 
perienced drivers and Inex- 
perienced drivers. Training 
avalable, good pay, and ben- 
efits. Homo more often. For 
more Information 1-600-284- 
B785{eoe-nVf:). 

"•AVON"* 1-800-329 

AVON. Earn $200- 

$1200/Month Commission. 
WORK YOUR OWN HOURSIt 
(Independent Representative) 
FREE TRAINING & SUP- 
PORT! Call Direct for Detaled 
Information. 24-Hour Hot Una 
* 1-800-329-AVON. 

SALES/MANAGER TRAI- 
NEE: NOW HIRING IN 
LOCAL (3) COUNTY AREAI 3- 
fult-tlme Sales/Manager 

Trainees. Dulles: Customer 
service and outside sales to 
focal clients. Complete training 
-$350 per week during OJ.T. 
QuaillcatJons: 21+ with car, 
DondaWe, ambitious. Cal Per- 
sonnel Manager 1-600-639- 
0923, 9-7, EOE. 



r 

J WANTED 

A$$ Earn that Extra Cash $$ 
ft Residential delivery. 
ft Small car and 
A insurance necessary. 

ft Mundelein 
I (8*7) 9*9-9240 
£ Ask for Jerry 






INTERNET 

CUSTOMER 

SERVICE 

*V5«tMWf Houm* 
*&dufy NeqoriAbtE* 

Internet ExpcRiewce Helpful 

CALL OR 
FAX RESUME TO: 



^fDIREerr 



JO S. WhiiNEy Si. 

GoAysUkE, IL 60070 

P It ONE 

847'22J'8199ext. 174 

Fax 847-225-88 10 

E'MaH - cq@lNd.coM 
ATTN: COR KEY CROSS 



l^pXx&ixx^ 3yua; 

MUNDELEIN 

Now Hiring For The 

Following Positions: 

-AM Hostess 

1st & 2nd Shift 

-Front Desk Clerk 

(Night Audit cxp.) 

-Driver 

Call Net Darien 

(847) 949-5100 
for full details 



SITE 

MANAGER 

professional management 
company seeks a Site 
Manager, clear oriented 
with prior apartment rental 
experience, for a 
Mundetftin property (143 
units). Complete benefit*. 
Fax resume to: 

(70B) 218-4926 



Accountant 

(Immediate Opening 
[Experienced accoun- 
tant needed for rapidly 
[growing national busi 
Iness publication in 
Libertyville, IL. Fax 
| your resume to 

(847) 680-9492 



NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS 

Please check your ad on the FIRST insertion date. In the 
event of an error or omission, we will be responsble for ONLY 
the FIRST Incorrect Insertion. The newspaper will be respon- 
sible for only the portion of the ad that Is In error. Please noti- 
fy the Classified Department In the event ol an error within 1 
week of run date. CANCELLATIONS must be made prior to 5 
p.m. on the Tuesday before publication. 

Lakeland Newspapers reserves the right to property 
classify all advertising, edit or delete any objectionable word- 
ing, or reject any advertisement for credit or policy reasons. 

All Help Wanted advertising Is published under unified 
headings. Lakeland Newspapers does not knowingly accept 
help wanted advertising that In any way violates the Human 
Rights Act. 

* Payment In Advance Is Required for These Ada: 
•Advertisers out of the Lakeland circulation area • Business 
Opportunities •Mobllo Homes • Situations Wanted *Oebt 

Disclaimers •Garage and Moving Sales •Found and 

Giveaway Ads are FREE. 

No pets will bo considered for giveaway. 

We Accept Vlaa Mastercard, Discover 





HAPPY MOTHER'S DAY GREETINGS 

Show Mom you 

care with a Happy 

Mother's Day 

Greeting 1 



Choose from one of 3 
bordered ads with art! 



Please , payment must 
accompany your order. 




Only 

*8.00 



(A) 




Only 

10.00 

(B) 





Just 

I £.00 

(C) 



Use this coupon & mail with payment to: Lakeland Newspapers Attn: Mom 
Or CaU (847) 223-8161 EB OB HB pa Box 268 » $$&& IL 60030 



Name 



Please Print Your Message Below: 



Address. 
City 



Phone 



I 
I 
I 



Total Enclosed 



|HAPPY MOTHER'S DAY 



I 



Greetings will appear In our May loth Issue of aU 13 Lakeland Newspapers. 
p) Copy must be received before noon on Tuesday, May 7th. 




Ap»il19, 1996 UkUNd Newspapers CLASSIFIED g| 







220 



Help Wanted 
Fall-Time 



220 



lldp Wanted 
Pull-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 

Full-Time 



CUSTOMER SERVICE 

College Grads. Will Train. 

Top Salary + Benefits. 

549-0016 



perlor JLcfsonncl 






fr 



RJ/s Eatery 

•BARTENDER 
•WAITRESSES 
•BUSSERS 
•HOSTESS 

Apply in Person 

1913 E. Grand Ave. 

Llndenhurst 

(847) 356-2300 



IT 



m 



Caloa/Photo 

Outgoing, «noiQe Be 
Individual to WDfk at 
OMlfaMPlMtoat 

Great America. 

Experience necessary. 

Call Ashley Photo 

(B47)M«-M22 

EOEM/F/tW 



S400 Weekly 
Ordmr Takers 

No experience necessary. 

Win train. 

(New foff-free number) 

1-888-252-2669 



r 



PUBLIC 



Busy chiropractic dlnlc needs 
an energetic, neat appearing, 
well organized Public 
Relatloru person. Position 
Involves working with the 
public, area business and 
many professionals, In a vari- 

Xof ways to market this 
c In a positive manner. 
Candidate must be aggrcssive- 
a 

or detail and a very pos- 
itive attitude. 

Please submit resume to: 

Lakeland Newspapers 

BoxK 

30 S. Whitney St. 

Crayslake, IL 60030 



ly friendly, sales oriented, 
st rone communicator, have 
head! 



Immediate 
Openingsfor 

Fun Time 
and Part Time 

Certified 
Lifeguard 

to work with severe 
devclopmentally disabled 
women. Contact Gail 
Becker. 

Mount 
St. Joseph 

(847) 438-5050 
lake Zurich 




WAREHOUSE 

OPPORTUNITIES 
IMC Holdings, Inc., la a 
loading manufacturer/ 
distributor of replacement 
parts -accessories to the 
ttt truck Industry. We are 
currently seeking krdvld- 
uala for full & part-time 
openings In nearby 
Gray stake. 

Position requires dedica- 
tion, good figure aptitude, 
ability to lift heavy object 
and a stable work history 
wtlh verifiable references. 
Previous warehouse 
experience preferred. 

This It a growth opportu- 
nity position that could 
lead to a group leader/ 
supervisory position. For 
consideration, apply In 
person from 9 am to 5 pm 
at 

IMC Holdings, Inc. 
95 South Route 83 
Gray slake, IL6O03O 

Equal Opportunity 
Employer M/F 



CHAUFFEUR 

FBfl/Fart Tlrec Will train. 
Moil be 25 years old and 

hive » good driving record. 

Call (847) 549-0020 



Auto 
SSoohanio y 

Pleasant Independent |jf 
car garage In Highland u 
Park specializing In J 
European Auto Repair it w 
•eeklng ambitlouo, |j| 

knowledgeable technl- u 
clan. Benefits offered. 

Call 
(847) 831-4882 

C4K«l«:«.«K«sT<K««ef 



•ACCOUNTANT^ 

EXPANDING Women's 
Clothing Co. In BUFFALO 
GROVE has an opening for 
an accountant with 1 To 3 
years experience. Degree 
preferred. 

RESPONSIBILITIES 
Include bank reconcilia- 
tions, journal entries, 
account and cost analysis, 
payroll, general ledger. 

BENEFITS Include 
health Insurance, 401 (k). 
vacation after 6 months, 
clothing allowance. 

MAIUFAX 647/485- 
0985 (resumes without 
salary requirements will not 
be considered) to: 1485 
Busch Parkway, Buffalo 
Grove, IL 60089 (e.o.e.) 



ORDER ENTRY CLERK 

Electrical contact manufacturer seeks experienced order entry 
clerk for Us busy Customer Service Department. Candidates 
must possess good computer and order entry skills along with 
knowledge of BOM "a. Manufacturing background required. 
Previous customer contact experience helpful. 

Interested candidates should apply in person or send resume 
with salary history to Dcringer Mfg. Company; 1250 Town 
Line Rd., Muodclcin, IL 60060. 




How To 

Survive 

The Job 

Search 

By Nancy Sakol 



Qi Dear.. .Search: I would like some advice and guidance on a famil- 
iar subject which you undoubtedly gel many questions on. 1 am 43 
years old and for the most part, an employed in a dead-end job with 
little prospect for advancement or significant increase In pay. 
Although 1 don't have a college degree, I have approximately a fresh- 
man college-levet education. I feel I have more to offer an employer 
and would like a challenging role in the job market. One of my 
biggest concerns is my age and how much of a negative impact that 
might have on a new job search. 

A: Does your firm offer any kind of one-on-one help in re-careering 
or starling over in the job market at middle age? Specifically, I would 
be looking for help in writing a precise and concise resume and tar- 
geting areas of interest which might help in a new job search. Any 
books, pamphlets or classes I could take would be greatly appreciat- 
ed as well. 

Q: Dear...Searcb: I enjoy reading your column in die Gumee Press 
and look forward to hearing from you soon. Thank you for your assis- 
tance. Sincerely, M.W. - Waukegan. 

A: Dear M.W. Thank you for your letter which is not only a "famil- 
iar subject", but one that is posed to me most often. You failed to 
mention to me what type of position you currently hold with your 
company and in what field. How long have you been employed with 
this company and how well versed are you in what you do? Does our 
firm offer any ono-on-one help? Most definitely, and that is why it is 
important for me to have all the facts before I can advance into any 
type of career screening and advice on your behalf. Superior 
Personnel offers a refreshing approach to guidance in the career 
search in a most creative way, and we never charge applicants a fee 
for our advice or resume evaluation. We do offer a resume service at 
a low rate for printing and another for composing and printing; how- 
ever, it would be my first attempt to guide you so as you may com- 
pose your own, as this is relatively easy, however time consuming on 
the part of someone looking to change careers. There are many books, 
classes and such that I may advise; however, with your information 
being so general at this point, it is virtually Impossible forme to offer 
suggestions to you at this time, if I am clueless as to wh si it is you do, 
and what it Is you desire in the way of change. What I would like to 
offer you, and those readers out there with the feeling of needing a 
change, give me a call and set up an appointment to come in. Let's 
see what we may be able to do to guide you in to a new career. It's 
painless ... and free. It may be the best hour you have spent discussing 
employment in a long time. 

Note: Nancy Sakol ia a licensed personnel professional 
and President of Superior Personnel in Gumee. 
Letters can be sent to Nancy at 4949 Grand Ave., 
Gumee, IL 60031. 



•DIE SETTERS 

Metal and foil bakeware mfgr. needs Die Setters with light gauge 
metal fabrication experience. Must have basic set-up hand tools. 
We have a reputation for maintaining a clean and safe environment. 
Competitive salary and extensive benefits provided. 

Call Personnel Dept. 
(847) 438-4600 

CM. Products, Inc. 

800 Ela Road 
Lake Zurich, Illinois 60047 

EOE 




220 



Help Wanted 
Fall-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
FnU-Time 



CUSTOMER 
SERVICE 

i Our Fortune S00 cSents need 
your customer service, 
accounting & administrative, i 
i General office, data entry aMBs i 
i for long ter m an d temp-to- 1 
i perm assignments. Ws offer i 
cornpetWvfl tatary. 

Please call Nam) at: 

Express 
Personnel Services 

(847)816-8422 
i or Fax (B47) 616-08M I 

1 motmimuuam j 

1 HEALTH CARM PACKAOVtQ 1 
« THt PSmOHHSL 

Msnvtcn mousmra 



Restaurant 

KftAMDBN'8 PUD 

A CHARHOU8G 

Looking for fun, dependable, team 
oriented bvJMduaai for: WAiTBTAJT. 
HOSTS, LINE COOK, PANTRY, 
EXPEDITER & DISHWASHER. 
Apply In person: lOam-Spm, 1432 
vVaufctgan Rd., Qlenvkw, 11647. 
998-6565. CarEon Square. 




220 



Hdp Wanted 
Fall-Tirne 



HOME 
TYPISTS 

PC users needed. 

$45,000 income potential. 

Call 1-800-513-4343 

Ext B-4458. 






BBBBBBBBBaaeaBsa 



s 



D 




II 

E 

11 
C 
D 

D 
C 
D 
B 

D 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 



U 

8 

a 

8 

a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
n 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 



CUSTOMER 

SERVICE 

REPRESENTATIVE 

(Cashier) 
Full time all shifts. 

Full time 
benefits Include: 
•MeoTcal & Life Insurance 
•Educational Assistance 
Program 

•Paid Vacation & Hofldays 
■60 Day Review 

AMOCO 
b FOOD SHOP 3 

LM poamotts AVAJLABLM \i 
K AT SSVSRAL LOCATIONS \i 

Sj wnmARMA. ™ 

(j PtMASM APPLY ATs 

•QRAYSLAKE a 
34225 Rt 45 * Washington ° 
•WHEELING 

996 Ss Elmburst R<t 

•LAKE ZURICH 
440 S. Rand Rd. 

•LAKEMOOR 

31635 N. Hwy. 12 

•MUNDELEIN 

2029 W. Maple Ave. 

juuoBooaoygHQOOH 



Social Services/ 
Direct Care 

Full time positions 
available working with 

people with autism. 

Near Gumee. S7.3S per 

hour, excellent benefits. 

Must have a valid 

driver's license. 

EOE 

Call 

(847) 292-9445 



^S$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$55v 

« Telemarketers needed ** 
immediately. 

W0RKIHA FUN AND HEALTH ENVIRONMENT 

NO PHONEMES 

FULL-WE/PART-TIME HOURS 

All SHIFTS AVAILABLE • $B410 HOUR 

CALL ANDY AT 

V 847-395-9371 Jl 
^$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$^ 



Its 6priiWSuffliiier Hiring Time 

t Jhe ftds are out ofscnooCandare tbofingfor that summer work not to 



B 

B 

E 

B 

B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 



mention anyone else who could take advantage of summer employment 

So Lakeland's 13 papers is your /w£ to finding the help you need 

lake advantage of our Sizzfat'Mot SpedaL %un 1 Weekjat regular price 

(min, 3 inch ad) and receive the Zndweekjat 1/2 0$fl 

Aft under a special Banner. Jbrmore 

information cm your Classified Recount 

Executive today andtafg a Site 

out of the Lafte County job" market! 

(847) £23-8161 

%gren 2(u6in e^.112 
Qreg Vkm/afc&c. 110 



4 




Medical 

Tired of the Smog of tfw City 
Come and see the riant 

From dm Wmm HassntatH. 

RN-ICU 

Navapache Regional Medical 
Center In Show Low, AZ has a H 
night position In the ICU dept Must 
have ■ current AZ RN He., possess 
at least ftvo yrs. of axp. In ICU. 
NRMC offers a oompetlttve benefit 
& salary pko. Come Join our famty! I 
Qualified applicants, please mall 
resume to; Correen Bales, Director 
H.R., Navapache Regional Medcal 
Center, 2200 Show Lake Rd., 
Show Low, AZ B5901 . EOE 



NURSE PRACTITIONER 

F/T Instructor position In University 
Student Health Center pronrldng (Snct 
joanl em a frieseae>ej tfiitnei »kf 
dent* tn terrlty nuree precnonet treat 
W4*t«r'i degree In nunkig, cortifcetton 
as edufi or lam. nurse practlfaner, a mtn- 
Imum or J vr*i earp. as nurse practitioner a 
■oensure or eUgUlfy tot Ucentuni In 
Induuia req'cl Salary commeniurale 
nrquaHcellone A exp. Bend cover lei 
roeuma a names ol three rekmnees ID 
Ann Uarrtner-Tbrney, Dean. ISU School ol 
Nurtno. Term Haute. IN 47800. 812/23T. 

oa.AAreoe. 



Medical 

Tired of the Smog of tto CJr/| 

Comoand sto tho stars 
l 



RECYCLE 




QMRP 

to perform case 

management 
services to case 
load of MR/DO 

Women In 
residential setting. 
Bachelor's Degree 

and one year 

experience with 

MR/DD population 

required. 

Contact 
Gail Becker 

Mount 
St. Joseph 

(847) 438-5050 
Lake Zurich 



Medical 

Tired of me Smog of the C/ty 

Come and tee the ttan 
From the NMa MhuntMint 

Diagnostic 
Imaging Director 

Navspache Regional MerJcal Center 
has a tit Director position for 
Diagnostic bneging who wit oversee 
all operations of the Olaonostic 
imaging Dept OuaWed applcanb 
must have a minimum of ftve yrs. in 
an acuta care setting, rrirsmum of 
km yrs. of supervbory exp, currant 
A.RR.T. & SWe Uceneea. COME 
JOIN OUR FAMIY1I Qualified apoe- 
cants pttase mail resume to: Correen 
Bales, f>. H.R., Navapache Regbntf 
Medical Center, 2200 Show Lake 
Rd. Show Low, AZ 85901. EOE. 



Medical 
Technologist 

NRMC. a comrrvrv hospital, ha* a 
W MedTeen poatton. tapgnstai br 

«naurir>g high quaSly laioratory tot- 
ing ot various spodmene, must pro- 
motepaitent A. Oat relations w/apro 
feaafoneJ image, prefer a 63 degree 
In Medcal Technology & on* yr. of 
exp. In high complexity testing. 
COME JOlrToUH FAMLYll QusMed 
appGcanta, pleas* mal resume ax 
Correen Bates, Dr. H.R. Navapache 
Rogkxial MecJcal Center, 2200 Show 
Lake Rd, Show Low. AZ 85901 
EOE 



Substance 

Abuse 
Counselor 

NICASAhaj a position avail- 
|able at Bridge House, a 20- 
bed Halfway House 
|Alcoholtsm Treatment Program 
|for recovering men and 
women. Must have a BA ot 
equivalent Human Services 
Mgree. Must be either a cenj. 
fied counselor or eligibte for 
certrficatjoa EOE/ADvV Send 
resume to: Debi Leer, Director 
of Bridge House, 3016 Grand 
Ave., Vvaukegaq IL 60065. 



Physical Therapy 

JOIN OUR HEALTH 

CARE TEAM AT ARH 

F/T Registered Physical Therapist 
lo provide services for outpatient 
onhoperJc & geriatric populations. 
Limited Inpatient care. Exc. oppor- 
tunity for professional growth & 
program development Current 
staff consists of 4 PTs, Z PTAs & 2 
Aides. Apple River Hospital Is loe'd 
In western Wisconsin approximate- 
ly 1 hr. from the Twin Cities. 
Wisconsin licensure reefd. We offer 
generous benefit pkg. CE opportu 
nibes & compoHBve salary. Please 
send resumes by April 29 to: Apple 
Rrver Hospital. ATTN: H.R., 230 
Deronda St. Amory. Wl 54001. 



Medical 

NURSE ADMINISTRATOR 

Opportunity available for a uniquely qualified Individual to create 
& direct a new home health care program In a respected & estab- 
lished rural Health Care System. This individual must have 
demonstrated leadership skills, accomplishment In marketing 
skills, complete knowledge of Medlcald/Medlcare, Home Health 
Care & other applicable requirements. If you are a Masters pre- 
pared Registered Professional Nurse with a min. of two (2) years 
administrative & clinical experience In the Home Health Care 
arena, you may be the Individual wa are seeking. 

We are a 50-bod, JCAHO accredited, community hospital & our 
rural setting Is In a 4-season recreation area in Southwestern 
Maine surrounded by lakes, rivers & other recreational opportuni- 
ties. There are several major ski areas within a short drive, ocean 
beaches about 1 hr. away. We are approx. 3 hrs. from Boston & 1 
hr. from Portland, ME Ideal location for raising a family. 

Qualified applicants may submit a resume & cover letter by Fax 
at: 207-743-1 566 or mail tor 

HUMAN RESOURCES 
STEPHENS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

80 Main SL, Norway. ME 04268 
An affiliate of Western Maine Health Care Corp. 

Equal Opportunity Employer 



Direct 
Care 



it 

i 
i 
i 

Direct Care Workers for) 
MR/DO women In resl-B 
dential setting. Full or Parts 
time Is available. Primarily I 
afternoons, evenings, and! 
weekends. We are com- 5 
mltted to quality residential I 
care. If Interested please I 
call Gall Becker. j 

(847)438-5050 * 

Mount ^ 
St. Joseph | 

Lake Zurich . 

eartwBaaeMWBar 



A 



Recreational 
Therapist 

Immediate Full lime 
position. Must have 

BA in related Odd, 

Call Gail Becker 

Mount 
Saint Joseph 

(847) 438-5050 
Lake Zurich 



CNA's 



^ILLCREST 



Nursing Center 



•$7.00/Hr. to Start 
Apply in Person 

1740 N. Circuit Dr. 
Round Lake Beach. IL 

(Behind Birger Xing on Rollins Rd.) 







I CLASSIFIED UvkdANd Newspapers Apail19, 1996 




Help Wanted 

Full-Time 



^J 



H Help Wanted 
U Full Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full Time 



220 



I lejp Wanted 
Full-Time 



Factory I 

•ASSEMBLERS* I| 
(1st Shift) 

We arc a mid-sized manu 
facturcr of laboratory prod 
ucts with openings In our 
Production Department 
Responsibilities include 
assembly of a variety of 
electro-mechanical prod 
ucts, Including soldering 
and using hand and power 
tools. 

Previous factory and 
assembly/soldering expe- 
rience desirable, but not 
required. Must be a flex] 
ble team player who 
enjoys a variety of duties. 

We offer a pleasant work 
environment, competitive 
wages and a benefits pack- 
age that Includes profit 
sharing and 40I(k). Stable 
work history required. 

Please calL- 

(847) 842-2300 

I2SWD93 Commercial Ave.| 

Barrington, IL 60010 

BARNANT 
COMPANY 

An EqinJ Opportunity Employer 



Maintenance Person 

iFult time needed for anj 
I apartment complex In the I 
IWooditocIc area. Excellent! 
[■alary &. company benefits [ 
(including 401K. vacation,! 
health Insurance, etc.... Thlil 
III a position for a idf-itarter I 
Jwilh their own tooli anclj 
|tran*portaiion. Musi knowl 
ItfVAC, plumbing and elec-l 
Itric, Appliance repair helpful.! 
IColl (815) 338-2583. 



STUCCO/DRYVITi 

Need I or 2 hardworking pco- 1 
I pie. Stucco experience pre- 
ferred but will (rain, Spanish & i 
English required. Mutt live near ■ 
(VjtinMjke Zurich. Call (847) f 
' 4JB-H14. Letvemcsuge. 



HVAC 5ERVKE 



Permwent Full lime PositiM 

I For resfcfontid A tght commor-1 
clal Including roof-top unrfj.l 
PoforoncGi rocrJred. 5 yoarjl 
minimum expertbneo. Excotontf 
bona fits & compensation. 

Send Resume ft: 

Lakeland Nempapm Box J 

30 I. Whitney Street 

Graytlake, IL £0030 



CENSUS TAKERS 

The ViUijc of Curace is no» accepting spplicilloni for die Innporary posJUon 
| of census enumerator for a Special Census starting April 15lh To qualify, an 
I Individual must be a US. QttBcn, ai least 1 8 yean of age with a high school edu-| 
caooo or cqurralenl, be physically able to do considerable walking and climb- 
ing of slain, available full-time including some evenings, should live in Ihc local i 
area, and mist pass a written lesL | 

l Applicant will be notified of the test time and place via mail , Job oayiJ700ocr 
J hour.Tralnlng will be provided. ' 

I Application forms are available at Tne Gumee MOage I tall. 325 North OPlaine ' 
| Road, Curare, Monday rJiru Friday, 800 tjn to 5:00 p.m. Idepbonc 623-7650. 
| Contact Jon Wildcnbcrg 

VILLAGE OF GURNEE 

An equal opportunity employer 



District Treasurer 

District \ 14 is searching for an individual lo act as district' 
treasurer. Person must be well qualified in accounting/boot 
keeping skills. Preference given to individuals with knowl- 
edge of Illinois School Accounting procedures. This is not a 
full time position. 

For more information call the Superintendent at 

847-587-8275 

Position begins July I 



Get youR Foot in tUe dooiil 

Expanding Composition 
Department is seeking innovative 

individuals in the Graphic Arts 

Field who know their way around 

a Macintosh computer. 

This entry level position 

requires emphasis on typesetting, 

ad design, and deadlines. 

Call Roselle Love at 
(847)223-8161 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 




Red* 
Lobster 

LAKEHURST 
NOW HIRING SERVERSl 

FULL AVAILABILITY 

(LUNCH & DINNER) 

BUSINESS IS BOOMING!!! 






<*> 



SERVERS MAKE' 

lETWEEN $3O0-$50( 

A WEEK (Full Time). 

Pan lime Hours 
Also Available 



Please apply in person 
900 Lakehurst Rd. Waukegan 



We are an equal opportunity employer 



INSURANCE 



Gumee Independent 

Insurance Agency seeks 
licensed Personal Lines 
CSR. 

Rating, underwriting, mar- 
keting, excellent communi- 
cation skills & computer lit- 
eracy is essential. 

Send resumes to: 

Insurancenter 

4673 Grand Avenue 
Gumee, IL 60031 



Immediate Openings 

Gurnec-bafled Englo 

Finance is seeking 

collectors for our fast 

paced automobile 

finance corp. Some 

experience helpful, will 

train the right person. 

f?nllAnv< ininto 
corn piflta an n"* Qmotc d 
tato prt° nc nppli cntloni 
(847) 549-5831 Ext. 637 




! 



Machinists 



•CNC MACHINISTS 
•MACHINE BUILDERS 

•MANUAL LATHE 

CAMCO ii a dfvlilon of m« 
Foftun* !00 Emsrton E!*:trfe 
ContJirtjt tpaetuzlng In buftflng 
pr»d*tan cam-bated Indue drlvat 
and pirn nanclari lor tactory 
automalion septettens. Wi havn 
axcaRatil QpponunitMt lor CNC 
rracrilrtili and machlnf btikMrt 
to |om our cpantf ng company. 

Tha bsnsfflt ol working at 
CAMCO a/a: ■ gnsai twridng MM 1 
ronmanl; compaMiva waoai; 3 
haafifi Inwjranta program*; dantil 
Innjnvscr, Of* inmranca; trea ali- 
tor™; ulaty glaiiai and u'aty 
■hoai mfmburwmenl; lulllon 
ralmburtamani; pamlon plan: 
401K: 2 *«ti vacation; tt paid 
IxHOiyK and a clean 4 air condi- 
aonad ladkty. Plaaia caiT (8*7) 
435-55^-4 or apply In pawn 
bt&MSfl 8:00 am. • 3:00 p.m. 

Human Resources 

CAMCO 

1444 S. Wolf Rd. 

WhMllng. IL 60090 

BBS 



Assembly 

Mundelcln firm needs 
responsible production 

„ person to work on a var '' ffi 
cty of tasks In electro- 
mechanical assembly & 
testing. Must be fluent In a 
English. Must have ability 
to learn and be committed 
to precision work- Full 

| benefits. 

Call 

(847) 566-8820 g 
or fax resume 
(847) 566-8837 

fli iii i i i i ii ii i i i iii i i f it 



* GOVT •POSTAL JOBS* 

$11.45 to $16.62 hourly 

For employment Info. 

and Job application 

I-8IS-506-5354 Ext 2054 



Alpha & Numeric, 45 wpm, 
J 1+ yrs. exp. $8.00/hr. 

J GURNEE 244-0016 • V. HILLS 549*OOX6 5 



3 <^ XZ> 

J __ Z^Htperior jLersonnel J 




Now Accepting Applications For: 

INSPECTORS/PACKERS 

Long term positions with a local plastic injec- 
tion molding company in Gumee. 

• It-HOUR AM $• M Shifts 

• ♦7.Z0/Hr. (AM Shifts) 

• tf4$/Hr. tPM Shifts) 



50 Pomus After 40 Hrs. 
(Present Ad At Interview) 



j-5 years stable work history preferred. 

Call Larry For More Details: 

(847) 244-0889 

3701 West Grand Ave * Unit 1 • Gumee, IL 60031 






We Don't Ask For 
Experience — We Give It! 

Most employers ask for experience — 
we don't. Tlic Air Force offers these 
powerful tools to prepare you for the 
21st century; 

• Education 

• Training 



Experience 




Help Wanted 
Full Ti me 

LAND 

SURVEYING 

FIRM 

hafl opening for Field 
Icrow Chief, nnd/or 
Jlnstrument/Draftamn 

In, PLS or SIT a plus. 

[Apply to: 

James It Diet** 

Pro/rMiional 
Land Surveyor 
510 Cedar Lnko Itond 
Round Lake, Illinois 
(847) 546-9411 



POSTAL 
JOBS 

$12.68/hour to start. 

plus benefits. 

Carriers, Sorters, 

Clerks, Computer 

Trainees, for an 

application & 

exam tnformaUon call 

1-800-819-0916 
ax.P9509 

8am-Bpm 
7 days 



1 




t 




Bilingual 

Spanish Req. 

Join our fast growing 

team in Waukegan 

Excellent 

communication skills. 

Sates esp. helpful 

Flexible Hours 

Submit Resume 

UniTemps 

Fine. 
446 N. Green Bay Rd, 
Waukegan 



Collections /Billing 

Midwestern Regional Medical 
Center has excellent oppor- 
tunities at our otQce In Zlon 
fon 

•Patient* 

Accounts 

Team Member 

(Full-Time) 

This position will be responsi- 
ble for accurate verification 
screening, collection and 
adjustment application process 
for hoapluu and physician 
accounts. The TylHsle we 
seek must have l-2ycarsexpe- 
rlence In nospUal or physician 
couecuona/bining. knowledge 
of cash application, good oral/ 
written communication ifcflki 
and computer/data entry abili- 
ties. CRT and Insurance verifi- 
caUon experience preferred. 
CompeUUVe salary and excel- 
lent benefits. 

For consideration, apply In per- 
son or fax/send resume to: 

Hainan Resources 

2901 Emmsus Avenue I 

Zlon, IL C0098 

FAX: S47-872-6222 

Midwestern Regional 

Medical Center 

An Eqiul Opportunity Employer 



Automotiva 

Impact Your 
Future ... Todayl 

Superior Sound, Inc. Is Iho 
Midwest's Largest automotive 
attorrnarkot accessories Dis- 
tributor, and we're Still 
Growing. Wo currently have 
openings at our Crystal Lake, 
Nonhbrook and Mundeleln 
locations. It you are motivated 
to experience success, you 
can Join our loading team as: 

• Automotive Air 
Conditioners Installer 

• Automotive Accessory 
Installers 

• Rustprootera/Detalrort 

Experience In any ol Iho 
above la desired, but we will 
train the right Individuals. Must 
have reliable transportation 
and a valid driver's license. A 
company-paid employment 
exam required. 

Wo offer excellent earnings, a 
comprehensive Insurance 
package, profit sharing, paid 
vacation and Iroa uniforms. 

Take advantage ol these 
opportunities by calling: 

Kelly 
847-382-9300 




lldpWanlcd 
U Full-Time 



220 



IWpVofcrJ 
Pull-Tlmc 



I uuuU 



TELEHARKETIHG 
EARN UP TO $500 

Exlm Gash In 
Your PocketU 

Dally pay, no oxporlonco 

necessary. Start today, 

Full or Part Time. 

Mundeleln 
(847) 9494149 

Ask for Jerry 



Customer Relation, 
Representative 

Entry lCVG | der , , 
position, will jrain 
Good typing/keyboard 
skis requlrcd/som 
college preferred 

Competitive ia(a 
position. Career oppor- 
(unity. Send resume to- 

GMAC 

ISTri-StatelrtternatJocui 
Uncolnshire, IL 60069 
Attn: KJ Brady 






•::• 



ii^^L^iMSj&tth^tmHmKuUKi 



$04 



Architect 



Architect 

Will rough out sketches for 

your Qddiu'on/remodcling 

project with you at your homo. 

1-3 hr. deaifjn sessions. 

CALVIN COX 
ARCHITECT 

(847) 623-4482 




S39 



Housekeeping 



I WILL CLEAN YOUR 
HOUSE on a woo WtAI- woo If- 
fy basis. Very thorough, do- 
pondablo. Non-smokor. Rofer- 
encos. (847) 548-3759 loavo 
mossago. 

MEAN MAIDSI 

WE HATE AND 

TERMINATE DIRT. 

WE WILL CLEAN YOUR 

HOME WEEKLY, 

BI-WEEKLY OR 

ANYTIME. 
(847) 746-2245. 



DIRT 

Pulvcriad din. Free ddiwy 

All lypei of mulch, muihrooa, 
comport, nod, at 

Cndi iCqidiActrpttd 

SURE GREEN 

(708)876-0111 

REMINDER... 

THE NEW AREA CODE FOR OUR 
AREA IS (M7) 



S39 



Ifoasckocpisg 



PARTNERS 

I'KOFKSSIO.YU. 

iin.Miici.|.;.\M\(j 



Nr fin 'lit Ul IHtm l.wr tr»>\ 
I'lnwilii'il) ffi'url intuitu 

(S47) 74(i.7f)72 



rDoubi " KrCKkonintp 



-Professional Cleaning 
-Reasonable Rates 

-Dependable 
-Great References 

We Take Pride in What We Do 
$5 OFF ON FIRST INITIAL CLEANING 

WITH THIS COUPON 

CALL KIM FOR AFREB IN-HOME QUOTE 
(847) 546-3408 



I 
I 
I 



\X 



LukElANd 

CUssifieds 

Get ike Job DoneI 

CaI1(847) 225-8161 



$42 



Lmdsaptog 



S33 



Handyrtua 



LAWN SERVICE Depend- 
able lawn care. Reasonabte 
rates. Free estimates. Mid- 
west Service (847) 395-3345, 
1-80Q-836-3895. 



HANDYMAN 

SERVICES 

No job too big or too 
small. Speedy completion. 

Call for esL 
(847) 546-3969 



& Topson. 

FREE DELIVERY 

-Shredded Hirdwood 00 cu. rl 

Shredded Cedsr OO cu.yi 

•Cedar Cu> 80 cu. yd. 

4^pre4iWScu.¥d. 

.RedCe4tr$42cuycL 

$8perysriloipread 

Also minhroom compon, uia. 

grsvtl. i peon ibdli. 

CnditCaniiMtjpltd 

BTJBE QHIIES 

(708) 876-0111 



S57 



Piinlmg ( T)ocoriiiDg 



PRECISE PAINTING 

INTERrOrVEXTERlOR. 

New construction or we can 

make k look Ike newt 

Export Wal^japor Removal 

and WaH Repair. 

Ready to be painted 

or papered. 

Call us about Spring Deck 

Specials. Reasonable Rales. 

Nevor a charge for estimates. 

(847) 546-2860 Of 

(847) 395-0490. 




TREE & STUMP 
REMOVAL 

bmd Clearing 
Wholesale Seasoned Hardwood 

Nordstrom Tree 
Experts Co. 

(Fully Insured) 

847-526-0858 



■fc^" 



EOE 



CkssifiEd 
AdvERTisiNq 

Continues 

FollowiNq WHEEL DEALS 

1 Pdl'OuT SECTiON 



April! 9, 1996 UkelANd Newspapers WHEEL DEALS 




High performance computing improves automotive products 



High performance computing has 
played a critical role in reviving the 
U.5. automotive industry, affecting vir- 
tually every facet of its work, from 
enhancing product quality and reliabili- 
ty, to streamlining designs, improving 
vehicular safety and boosting fuel efn- 
.ciency, while reducing production cost 
and shortening development time. 

Much of the high tech pre-commer- 
cial research and development respon- 
sible for this revival has been made 
possible by federal HPCC funding to 
the academic supercomputing commu- 
nity and national labs, with positive 
repercussions throughout the entire 
economy, stimulating jobs, exports and 
profits. 
There is no turning back 

Problems that once took days or 
weeks to resolve, can now be handled 
in minutes or hours. Modifications that 
once took several months to implement 



can be realized in a matter of weeks. 
Over the past 1 years, crash simula- 
tion had become the largest user of 
computer resources in the automotive 
industry. Today very few costly, full- 
size crash models are built because 
computer simulations can co most of 
the work. All crash simulation software 
now used by U.S. automakers is based 
on software first developed at national 
labs and academic supercomputing 
centers. The following are examples of 
recent or current work with similar 
implications for the automotive indus- 
try: 
Improving auto safety 

Engineers at several Ohio universi- 
ties are using the expertise and 
resources of the Ohio Supercomputer 
Center (OSQ to improve auto safety. 
One such project has already resulted 
in new hood and fender designs in the 
Ford Taurus. Trauma to the head is a 



frequent injury to pedestrians involved 
in automobile accidents, occurring 
when the head strikes the car hood. 
Using computational visualization tech- 
niques, researchers found that by incor- 
porating simple, low-cost design modi- 
fications into existing car models the 
severity of such injuries could be 
reduced significantly. 

Others are using OSC facilities to 
study the dynamics of an automobile 
crasn, with the goal of developing door 
designs and paddings that mitigate 
injury causing forces. 
Automobile design 

In the early 1 990's researchers for 
General Dynamics, working with the 
San Diego Supercomputer Center 
(SDSQ, created a new manufacturing 
process to make molded auto panels 
from injected polymers. The panels 
were designed for the Chevy Lumina, 
and the process developed tor manu- 



facturing polymer parts is now used 
throughput the automotive industry. 

Other research at SDSC, aimed at 
improving highway paving methods, is 
yielding information that can help auto 
manufacturers to design better tires, 
heavier loadings, improved t;urck sus- 
pension systems and axle configura- 
tions. 

University of Toledo engineers cur- 
rently are working on projects at the 
Ohio Center to minimize fatigue stress 
cracks in automobile shafts and to 
improve the operation of the crankshaft 
and rod bearings — all critical factors in 
automotive design. 
Heavy equipment 

Caterpillar, Inc., working in partner 
ship with the National Center for 
Supercoming Applications (NCSA) is 
using virtual reality technology to test 
and improve the efficiency of heavy 
See HIGH PERFORMANCE page CIS 




Announces 



in 



1.9 APR* And Up To $2,000 Back 





GTI VR6 












.^»_j3I 


IfppK 


^ 


-*&)&&&* &??***. 


•i^ir~>;^ 


£a 




-m ' m 




. 












JETTA GLX 








a v 






— — — J^y 









CUTLASS SUPREME 



ACCENT GT 





DELTA 88 LSS 



ELANTRA GLS SEDAN 





PASSAT GLX 



AURORA 



SONATA GLS SEDAN 




BPmH 




/^■wl QxQ IflP"'-' " -~# £^-t 55S*^ 


1. I^B 7 — 1 




■1,0 APR available tor creditworthy cuilomtn tor 24 mot. $2,000 oath back on '05 Elantra GLS modala. 




M ARQU ARDT MOTORS m. « * Washington st. 

GURNEE, IL 

., . 249-1300 

Mori. - Thur, 9-9; Frl.9-B; Sat, 9-5 



,.:, ..L f.l- lia.tU 



1 

OWimobilo I 





Cars that make sense. 



' 







*%wi D«*b Ucfad Neksprt^ns Ap«il 1 *, 1 m 




Dodge Rain holds value 
better than others 



Dcdae Rax* w?( Vic j tot crhtsiy* 
equipment bujJiiire r-TuKriiis rjr—i rg 
^?ar and anvthfcg <**»* toUirfk ewnss 
need to baul ! anxinii. 5ct cher;* '^ s^"*e*- 
thfng the Dodge xsrrr hoes ceflKT &oa 
any ether truck- fe «afa» 

• Based on c^cuistfers usng \i$~ 
ues from the NIADA crrTosj Lasasd 
Car Guide®, Dodge Sam res* has s 
high resale value tnan cDrncars&'e 
Ford, Chevy and GMC (tuosl 

• A 3- year, 35,CCG tnfle i v *bcrev- 
er comes first} bumper^o^ixrrer tent- 
ed warranty covers the compete vehf- 
de against defects m fiaccry-sjpefiied 
materials and woricnanshqp. 

• The 3/36 Customer Ore Care 
Ptan stays wkh the vehicle and Brans- 
fen automatically to subsequent own- 
er* -r -o cost curing the warranty ceri- 
:c. 

• '^:^cs;"ce -Assistance fcc 3 years or 
hl'.Ol ~*i es crov(dfr« 2-*-hcu\ 7-cay- 
s~«ee:t: rr*er?=ro road serves, ccr- 
raced! r< = ;^--cu* rstpomwvce xtfE- 
T=e Barter. 

• A 7~.ea* cr TCGCCC .-tie <xfr=r- 



pjrrrf rj^rra.efr iimifec wsmiiT' 

* Scecs/i iccartSe? i:r ca-i-erdai 
teidfc ruvers iss* *cur ctezfen feir 
cmca'is; 

• tfl £iKrcrihe£C-erji. -cLcinr. 

:re rccr is sa><arrfi3s£. 

Vii cenft ri*c Ccckk Kara s gpec 
icois ra "ice- tns Dcejjp SSrn «ss 
eommssjsa for * isarci cu'Ci *«crc 
Dkwsgs cut. ^ cccre ire re cei?s 
ca-Tbrircie n i * SS6 £ccjg£ v^i - 
dSttra ©war fcercrs 

• Circus l&azn 5 Ruerieir s iSe 
.-co— iiss en re KrsnSaS is rec* esgd -ir 
*rc Cue Car ~cee<s 

• ?tu— r»ccx Tssdiar csb rodefis 
prwee rims .-cot- irr recce arc 
thefr sc_rr n-ir crcr« -co— re~ire re 
sea: t&aa ii-'. are* nccir. 

• .^u— ofisrs "tots rrfe-1'.rrrss 
sestf"*--: ct— rcn *«fnr — o*e srojc KX* 
rSp recr- tfeaa !]--■ nrer pom. 

• Ceroer SOsres? Grrsrie "ccar-c 
in the cercer arsa *sfc ~i*s -rf'cur >rr- 
sse S=s*r_rs25 -cr r/f!—s cr rencra." 
cct-rrcua-rs rerijsr pcores. e*rr„. "eec 
to hs'o ^cu. 5et v;u* cc cere. 




FOX LAKE CMB-JBS6IX 

WE WONT BE UNDERSOLD! 

WE WILL 



TL ^ST ANNOUNCED 

2.9% 



1!955 FOKDTRO^OSGLS » ^ 

i b auoai Ton JUirim; ff I %0OO 



H594 W'BD F3&0 4a^4 

1LT ISQ *4 mBi. iCCU TW88 

m«K3CWrTWUCS 

x rcir, mfc, ^«C 

t^l CJWTfeHiUJBi 

lure. ^C i zxr. 

1:9*90 C4SVT C 1500 

i:»95 FO-RD CftOVN VKT0-R1A LX 



■4995 

K£aK 

JuBD 

■9888 



BEATAiyY 
DEAL BY 






THi 



AUTO LOANS 



YOU OeSERteJWOTHBt CHANCE 



CALL MOW TO RIKO OUT HCfW MUCH 
YOU QUAUFir FOR! H 



mnt 



mmjNi 




MERCURY*: 



,,,,_,■— | SALES & SamCC 847-587^400 

*/§r^__J flii sasicsaccr«y 

"Champions of Low Prices" 
90 South Rte. 12 • FOX LAKE, [L 60020 



2; 



^i . i 



I'K 



*f>- 



«tp 



". -?^. 



Are You Paying Lots For A Little Time 



mm 






:■-:•;... 






sim 



% 



tf*< 



ic«r- 



•^ 



5*v. 



mm 



wmm 



. ->>.-■•■■■ 



m^ 






Fot Mofic Lnfoim2iioin, Calk 

(847) 223-8199 



On The Internet? 

•^r'-ni£t is an enjoyable and useful soui>De of infor- 
for many people. Ho^^ever, if you have any 
esqpsdeace ^'nth lt r you know how fast thos« usa^e bills 

* 

can add up. Thafs whv Lakeland netDIRECT offers 

yotL a Iccsl cennectfon - to let you spend more time 

bEfmsEig, Lass tzzne pacing high Internet usage bills. 

Call netDIPvECr today and see what a difference a 

Local phone call can make. Then go ahead, surf. 

netDIRECX youTl get 

. Lccai fham OH F-o? Orc. T 30 Prefixes • Unlimited Use 

• Qiat Gr^2?5 • News Groups • E-Mail 
» Hat F*e of 525 • World Wde Web Access • Web Pages 

• Scpposts Up To 33.6 Modems 

* D^cronf Rires Available 



L444 



Much Mo-re!!! 



^tDIREei 



ur" 



***"• \> v 2? 



'".■■':' -ilS'T '.'- 



: f! 



April 19, 1996 UlcdANd Newspapers WHEEL PEALS 




THIS AREA'S HIGHEST CUSTOMER SATISFACTION 



CHEVROLET GEO DEALER IS OFFERING YOU 



DAYS 



ONLY 

FRIOM 



• 5$ AmtwwMy Speeioh On All Vehicles 

including hard to get models SWB»™~ 

• GM & Ray Chevrolet Geo Have Extralswurow 
Inventory For This Event At Huge Savings! 

• Special Financing As Low As 3.9% 
•A I Vehicles Priced For Immediate Sale 

• Highest Trade In Allowances For Your Vehicle 

Out Of State Buyers And Local Wholesalers Will Bid On Your Trade 

• On The Spot Delivery 



APR 
48 MO. 



Special Finance Reps On Hand To Assist. 

Bring Your Title, Down Payment And Job Verification 



,•. 



LIVE BROADCAST 

WIIL 95. 1 FN 
RADIO 

SATURDAY 
APSIL29& 




FREE 

REFRESHMENTS! 

• FREE GIFTS 

WITH EVERY 

JEST DRIVE 



WHA T YOU PA Y IS LESS EVER Y DAY AT RAY CHEVROLET/GEO! 



Cfi£!fff0l£r 



Goochmncf) StrAot&Lt*.*: <■ 

• ASE Certified Technician 

• Coui1«»v All«w*w Trampotniion 

• LiUlim* 5«ivtc( Guwanltt 

• ConrpttlBv* UpFronl Pucmg 



WISCONSIN 
"ILUNOIS" 



spuing cbove 



39 NORTH ROUTE 12 ■ 

FOX LAKE { 
(847) 5873300 



33 N. ROUTE 12 
FOX LAKE (847) 587-3300 L 

' HOURS: Soles: Mon.-Fri. 9 AM - 9 PM; Sat. 9 AM - 6 PM • Service: Mon.-Fri. 7 AM - S PM; Sat. 8 AM - 4 PM 



GBAYS1AKI 




APR FINANCING 

ON SELECT MODELS 



■MB1|>^' 



r 



i 






r 




WHEEL DEALS UkeUwd Newspapers Apitil 19, 1996 





New Car Directoiy 



RECEIVE A FREE S25 DINING CERTHICA1E Plus.- f^irter to m a fcrij./" *• ^^^fj^. 
WHEN YOU TAKE A TEST DRIVE AT ONE OF THE PARTICIPATING AUTO DEALERSHIPS IN THIS SECTION! 

•Seo the front page of WHEEL DEALS for complete Information! 



Lake 
Geneva 



Twin 
Lakes 



Wilmot Sa 



Spring 
Grove 



Trevor 



KENOSHA 
COUNTY 



Kenosha 



Mchenry 
county 



Mc Henry 



Crystal 
Lake 



Wad worth 



i 




t 

N 



Zlon 



ikegan 



LAKE 
MICHIGAN 



©Long 
Grove 



Buffalo 
Grove 



COOK 
COUNTY 



Line ilnehire 




K 









h 




4& Ray Chevrolet-Geo 

39 North Rte. 12 

Fox Lake, IL (847) 587-3300 

%^ Raymond 
Chevrolet - Olds - Geo 

120 Rte. 173 

Antioch, IL (847) 395-3600 

ty Rocke nbach 
Chevrolet - Geo 

1000E. Belvidere 

Grayslake, IL (847) 223-8651 




^ Sandy McKie & 
Sons Inc. 

Dodge / Chrysler / Plymouth 

91 South Rte. 12 

Fox Lake, IL . . . . .(847) 587-6471 



^> Sandy McKie & 
Sons Inc. 

Dodge / Chrysler / Plymouth 

91 South Rte. 12 

Fox Lake, IL (847) 587-6471 



1 


§ FORD 


| 



^ Fox Lake Ford 
Lincoln Mercury 

90 South Rte. 12 

Fox Lake, IL (847) 587-3400 

<•► Reed - Randle Ford 

3100 Grand Ave. 

Waukegan, IL . . . .(847) 336-2340 



■■■VM^Haas 


§ LINCOLN 

Mercury @ 




Eim i 





<!► Fox Lake Ford 
Lincoln Mercury 

90 South Rte. 12 

Fox Lake, IL (847) 587-3400 



4^ Ray Chevrolet-Geo 

39 North Rte. 12 

Fox Lake, IL (847) 587-3300 

^Raymond 
Chevrolet - Olds - Geo 

120 Rte. 173 

Antioch, IL (847) 395-3600 

^ Rockenbach 
Chevrolet - Geo 

1000 E. Belvidere 

Grayslake, IL (847) 223-8651 



HYDROPS 



ty Marquardt Motors 

Olds / VW / Hyundai 

Rte. 41 & Washington 

Gurnee, IL (847) 249-1300 




Oldsmobile 



^Marquardt Motors 

Olds /VW/ Hyundai 

Rte. 41 & Washington 

Gurnee, IL (847) 249-1300 

^Raymond 
Chevrolet - Olds - Geo 

120 Rte. 173 

Antioch, IL (847) 395-3600 




VlymoutFI 



<>Sandy McKie & 
Sons Inc. 

Dodge / Chrysler / Plymouth 

91 South Rte. 12 

Fox Lake, IL .... .(847) 587-6471 



Fahrvergnugen 



^Marquardt Motors 

Olds /VW/ Hyundai 

Rte. 41 & Washington 

Gurnee, IL (847) 249-1300 



M M ^fj:,..;. | ■;'■', I K«l 1)1/ I Wiftid. J^KV/^j 

Apitit 1*, 1996 UltElANd Newspapers WHEEL PEALS 




' I 



VBffll 



!ffi 



WJ 






CHEWiOLET 
OLDSMOBILE 

GEO 

CHEVROLET 

TRUCK 









, 






■H 



Y^A 






^ 



' ■■ a<iMkW 



t-V ". 



1 ■-'! 






1 



: 



^ 



■ 






: 



■v) 

r "%^ 






'"•.-'■ .'1 



1 



\: 



■■v ' 






!-:« 



■a 












■'■?. ;H- 



■ : 






.■■•■ 



Mi 



: ^€&£i 



■ 






I 
I 






With The Purchase Of A 
Vehicle You Receive An 
Opportunity To Add To Your 
Fortune By Spinning The 
Wheel For Your Selection. 
Excludes Wholesale Vehicles. 



w/wm 



'96 CHEVROLET BERETTA 

#6749. Includes recent college grad rebate. 



12.2 



ass* T& 



'96 OLDS CUTLASS SUPREME 

#7008. Includes recent college grad rebate. 

$ 16,996 



OVER 25 TO CHOOSE FROM PRICED FROM *99 TO *1995 

iPnPRIZM ......'1995' 1988 DODGE SHADOW .:,.. '1995 1985 CHEVY CAPRICE :WGN . 



mon rcn PPI7M s 1995 laoo UUUUt annuim w** iauu urn.* ■ w™ ...«- ..-,. 

1990 GEO PRIZM .. ... ...... w» $QQC 1987 PQNTIAC GRAND AM . 

1990 GEO METRO s 1995 1986 FORD TEMPO ...... : .. v 995 1983 CHEVY CAPRICE 

1988 CHEVY CORSICA,. ...... 4995 1985 OLDS FIRENZA ........ '995 1977 CHEVY IMPALA ._ 



. . $ 995 

$ 1995 

.. *499 

. . s 99 



J 











k\ lI'iiVim T t ii3^"-TiA'£*~>>A 



'96 CHEVY IViONTE CARLO 

#6503. Includes recent college grad rebate. 








is iom as 




120 ROUTE 173 •ANTIOCH 

(2 BLOCKS EAST OF RT. 83) 

Bo!" SHOP HOURS: M-F 8-5 



SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT! 

3-9% APR FINANCING 

•96 GEO PRIZM ' 96 GEO TRACKER '96 GEO METRO 




(847) 395-3600 "EESfttflsr 



r 



! 



L 



v 



I 



t'' 









r^£^daifl0iPMnRWKWrMw»— 



-TIL- 




WHEEL DEALS UkcUNcl Newspapers Apail 1 9, 1 996 



804 



Cars for Sale 



824 



Vans 



1960 CALIFORNIA T- 

Q!RD. Mochanlcs restored. 
Ready lor paint and chromo. 
(847) 336-0007 aHof 5pm. 

1061 MARK VI, navy bluo, 
good runnor, no rust, 
S950/bosl. (847) 546-3814 
aftor4pm. 

1982 MERCURY HATCH- 
BACK, good runnor, now 
parls, body needs work, $600. 
(847) 546-8302. 

PONTIAC FIREBIRD 

1984, 4-CYLINDER, 

GOOD CONDITION. $900. 
(847) 023-6704. 

1985 MERCEDES BENZ 

300D TURBO 

Supor cfoan, showroom 

condition. Garogo kopt. SUvor 

with black Interior. A/C, power 

sunroof, powor everything, 

$9,900A>o3t. 

(B47) 507-4 1 19. 

1991 HONDA ACCORD 

LX, 4-door, 1 -owner, 49,000 
mites, fully loaded. Excellent 
condition In/out. Just tuned. 
$8.995. (847) 04 5-52 T 7. 

MERCURY TRACER 
1991, 4-door. automatic, 
A/C, cassotto, 78,000 mBos, 
excellent condition. Asking 
$3,995. Call tor Tom days 
(647) 249-2330, evenings 
(847) 223-5041. 

AUDI 1984, AM/FM cas- 
sette, A/C, power steer- 
ing/brakes. 2-way sunroof, 
new Ignition, muffler, tires, 
runs great, $2.3oat>est. (847) 
247-1678. 

QUICK REGAL 1991, 4- 
door, automatic, air, cassotto, 
crulso, powor everything. 
$6,695. (647) 223-9462. 

CHEVY CAVALIER 1989, 
55,000 mites, automatic, cas- 
sotto, $3,800/best. (647) 
546-0233. 

FORD GRANADA 1961, 
$400. (847) 973-0502. 

FORD PROBE GT 1993 
btac, 5-spood, AM/FM cas- 
sette, powor sunroof, 43K. ex- 
cellent condition, 
511,500/best. or take over 
payments. (&4T) 037-1047. 

HQHDA ACCORD LX 

■\Wi, A-door. AT wlconsote, 
power steering, power wind- 
ows, A/C, power brakes, 
AM/FM cassette. Newer 
brakes, Aquatreds, exhaust 
and tune-up. 64K easy com- 
muter miles. Excellent Interior 
and exterior. Totally depend- 
able and exceptionally clean. 
$6.950. Call (647) 548-1115. 

HONDA ACCORD EX 1995. 
automatic, sunroof, loaded, 
7.000 miles, black. 

S1B,40ftfrest. (706) 296-7432. 

LINCOLN 1988 MARK VII, 
all the toys, runs great, 
$5,900/best. (414) 657-6163 
after 3pm. 

NISSAN 300 ZX 1990, twin 

turbo, black/black leather, 5- 
speed, all options, mint conol- 
tlon, 69K miles. $13,000. Larry 
(847) 672-4512. 

OLDS CUTLASS SU- 
PREME 1991, 6-cyllndor, 
white, 2-door, clean, very 
good condition. $7,300. (647) 
487-Q744. 

PONTIAC 6000 1987, 4- 
door, one owner, wel main- 
tained, power steering, power 
brakes, power windows, air, 
rear delogger. (647) 740-2035. 



CHEVY ASTRO 1991 El 
all wheel drlvo pot 
tecks/wtndows, 77,000 mil 
groat condition, $8,350. (6 
546-9639. 



CHEVY CUSTOM Wlf» 
OW VAN, good condition, 6 
on englno, 12K on transn 
slon, now tiros and many n 
parts, mechanic own 
$2.000Jbost. (647) 249-1B2 



DODGE 1980 CONVE 
SION VAN, runs good. k>i 
docont, $900/bost. (4 
652-3775. 

DODGE 1994 DAKO 
Club Cab, SLT, V8 magn. 
engine, Century cap, vi 
clean, 36,000 miles, air, pot 
windows, AM/FM cassotto, 
receiver hitch. (4" 
869-6454 ovonlngs 



Unbeatable 




ind Chicago's Own#7 

Toni Ktjkoc, 




Cars for Sale 



l 



on a 



TO MORE SAVINGS & 



828 



Four Whcd Driv 
Jeeps 



FORD BRONCO 191 
EDDIE BAUER PACKAC 
ATR, 4X4, AIC, $4,300. (8* 
568-7468. 



1994 S-10 4-DOOR, r 
and grey Blazer, all powor, 
wd, loather Interior, 48,0 
mites, $18,700. (7f 
949-3948, 

FORD BRONCO XLT 191 
everything electric, powor a 
A/C, remote control, CD pb 
er, 4-whoet drive, lift who 
crulso control. $8,995. (81 
344-9522. 



Reed Randle's D.A.R.E. Donation Update: 

Heed torffe Forfs current donation to the HtoitoflM PAUL Pnym^Jmia m ctayons! 



1996 FORD TAURUSES 11996 FORD CONTOURS 



YOUR CHOICE: 2.9% hmmmm 



RHHOUHCEB 



M 



ISUZU 1989 1MPUL! 
TURBO, automatic, loadi 
handling by Lotus, sports < 
fun, Japanese rellabllltyl Nl- 
than Cellca GT or 240-£ 
Service records. $4,800. (4' 
551-7072. 



834 



Trucks/Trailers 



1966 GMC 1/2-TON 

PICKUP TRUCK 

Shortbed, step-side, 

big 6-cyllndor with 4-spo» 

Radial ttres, CB, AM/FM 

cassette. Camper top. 

Runs excellent. Some rus 

Asking $2,300. 

After 6pm 

Cal U*47\ 740-4075 




000 



• « 





>:•:■:•:•:■::■:■>:!::* 



$17,350 

5WF 



Is $14,555 



•ttW.'aW 



GASHBACKtOK NEW1 
'nccronDTCi** 




100% 

CUSTOMER 

SATISFACTION 

IS OUR 

GOAL! 



HUM* 





•. . mm/mm 

CASHBANMNEir 



itteusausttw 



•.■.^^A*&^&<$& 



' 96 F150s!!* 






1996 HAD RJUSGER SUPERCAB 1996 FORD F150 » 50 



F150S 



WUR CHOICE: 4.8% 



INSWCKt 



OiPA-FI 



1986 FORD DUALLY, 4 
engine, $10,000. (8 
949-1651. 



CHEVY PICKUP SIC 
STEP 350, 1978, black, i 
ton, snort bed, automa 
110,000 miles. $i,ooo/tx 
CHEVY PICKUP DIES 
FULL SIZE 1981, 1 ton, t 
tomatic, 91,000 mil* 
$1,5O0/besl. JEEP CO 
MANDO with pfc 

$1,0O0/best. INTERN 

TIONAL SCOUT with ptc 
51,000/bosl. For more In! 
mallon call (708) 710-39 
leave message or call Sue 
(706) 205-9554 BanHpm. 

DODGE RAM MINI 4) 
1988, 5-speed. Very do 
truck Inside and outslc 
$3,B00/b03>. (414) 537-43 81 

DODGE RAM PICK4 
TRUCK 1983, very clean, 
tie nisi, excellent conditk 
Runs great, Includ 
cap .$1 .500. (847) 587-7478 




$1 2,955 



w/ m 



$1 3,955 



snail 80 





FORD 1988 RANG! 
SUPER CAB. 5-spo* 
$3^00/bost. (414) 942-70 
evenings. 



810 



Classic/Antique Can 



838 



Heavy EqujprocQ 



'88 Ford 

Crown Vic 



' 88 Pontiac 

Grand Prix 



95 Ford 

Aspire 

$7655 



" 89 Pontiac 

Grand Am 



Hyundai XL 



"93 Chevy 

Cavalier 

$7955 



' 87 Mercury 

Cougar XR7 



93 Dodge 

Shadow 



94 Ford 

Tempo GL 

S7955 



87 Pontiac 

Trans Am GTA 

$4955 

91 Chevy 

Camaro RS 

$6955 

'92 Honda 

Civic LX 

$9955 



1957 FORD RANCHERO, 

solid body, H.I.P.O. 302, au- 
tomatic, T-BIrd Interior, runs 
good, mag wtieels, AM/FM 
stereo, new tires, engine de- 
tailed, needs finishing, 
$5,900/bOSt. (647) 223-7099 
Wild wood. 



1984 LT 9000 Tandem A) 
Dump, 350 Cummins, 1 
speed transmission, equlpp 
with 1011. Western hydroti 
plow. Asking $23.000/be 
(414) 652-8477. 



844 



Motorcycles 



814 



Service & Parts 



CHEVY, FORD PICK-UP 

bodies. Factory new, guar- 
anteed from $1,300. Doors 
from $89.00, lenders from 
$50.00, beds from $800, bed- 
liners $169.00. BUMPERS, 
GRILLS, REPAIR PANELS, 
PAINTS, ABRASIVES, WIND- 
SHIELDS, RADIATORS. Deliv- 
ery. Mark's 217-824-8184. 

REBUILT ENGINES 302 re- 
built, 305, rebuilt Chevrolet 
transmission, used available, 
reseated with 90 day warranty 
Instated, complete brake work 
and automotive repair. (647) 
872-7150 Mlto's Automotive 
& Radtalor Repair In Zton, 



1985 KAWASAKI VULCA 
700. Excellent condition. As 
Ing $2,000. Call Matt (84 
625-8144. 



1985 KAWASAKI VU 
CAN, $1,950*eat. (84 
336-1935 ask lor John. 





4000 




m 



mm 



+il 




m 



gs 






On Most Used 



' 87 Plymouth 

Voyager Wgn 

$3955 

*" 89 Ford 
F150XLT 

$6555 

' 92 ford 
F250 XLT 

$12,855 



* 86 Ford XLT • "89 Mazda "88 Ford E1 50 

Broco Fullsize B20OOP/U 12 Passgr. 

$3955 $4755 $4855 

"90 Ford '90 Ford ' 92 Ford 2dr 

F150 XLT F150 Supercab Explorer Sport 

$7955 $9955 $12,455 

'94 Ford ' 92 Ford 4dr '94 Ford 

F150XLT Explorer XLT Bronco 4x4 

$14,755 $15,555 $16,355 



*AD0 UX, TITlf, UC & DOC Rt BOB tffllffl Bfi 7/2/96. **IM£ BK 7/2/96. OH JflH! JW0H5. 



DUAL SPORT 1987 Yam 
ha XT 350. Geared lor > 
road, lull englno rebulle 
alter market muflior, MOTO 
tires, and many other extrt 
Must ride to app racial 
$1,4O0/besl, Call Pete (64 
223-6088 evenings, (84 
623-4400 days. 

HONDA GOLDWIN 

1976. Very good shap 
Sl.OOO/Tlrm. (414) 843-2. 
alter 5pm, before 9pm. 



ALIFORNIA T- 
chanlcs rostorad. 
paint and chromo. 
3 607 after 5pm. 

IK VI, navy blue, 

nnor, no mat, 

(847) 546-3814 



RCURY HATCH- 
ood runner, now 
' needs work, $600. 
B3Q2. 

FIREBIRD 
4-CYLINDER, 
ONDITION, $900. 
6704. 

ERCEDES BENZ 
OD TURBO 

doan, showroom 
Garatjo kept. SUvor 
Intorlor. A/C, powor 
power ovorythlng. 
S.OOObest. 
7) 587-4119. 



3NDA ACCORD 
r, 1-ovmer, 49,000 
i loaded. Excelont 
In/out. Just tuned. 
17) 945-5217. 



TRACER 
•door, automatic, 
otto, 76,000 mDos, 
condition. Asking 
all for Tom days 
9-2330, evenings 
5041. 



Bjft££i&9^^ 



,'f.uiife. 



%»y\ 



84, AM/FM caa- 
C, power steer- 
, 2-way sunroof, 
on, muffler, tiros, 
, $2,30Ot>ost. (647) 



IEGAL 1991, 4- 
matlc, air, cassotto, 
wwor everything. 
17) 223-9462. 



CAVALIER 1989, 
tos, automatic, cas- 
3,800/besl. (647) 



aRANADA 1981, 
T 973-0502. 



ROBE QT 1993 
>eed, AM/FM cas- 
<er sunroof, 43K, ex- 
condition, 
est. or take over 
(847)937-1047. 



ACCORD LX 

bor. AT w/cortsolo, 
wring, power wlnd- 
;, power brakes, 
cassette. Newer 
K qua! rods, exhaust 
up. 64K easy com- 
». Excellent Interior 
lor. Totaly depend- 
excepUonaJfy dean, 
yi (647) 546-1115. 



\CCORD EX 1995, 

, sunroof, loaded, 

mltos, black. 

est. (708) 296-7432. 



1986 MARK VII, 
toys, runs great, 
St. (414) 657-6163 



300 ZX 1990, twin 
ckvWack leather, 5- 
optlons, mint corxfl- 
nles. $13,000. Lany 
-4512. 



I 



Classic/Antique Cars 



I 



Service & Parts 



824 



Yam 



CHEVY ASTRO 1991 EXT. 
all whoel drlvo powor 
locks/windows, 77,000 miles, 
groat condition, $8,350. (647) 
546-9639. 

CHEVY CUSTOM WIND- 
OW VAN, good condllon, 65K 
on engine, 12K on iransMls- 
alon, now tiros and many new 
parts, mechanic owned, 
$2,O00/t>OSt. (847) 249-1B21. 

DODQE 1980 CONVER- 
SION VAN. runs good, looks 
decent, $000/bost. (414) 
652-3775. 

DODGE 1994 DAKOTA 
Club Cab, SLT, V6 magnum 
englno, Confury cap, vory 
clean, 36,000 miles, air, power 
" windows, AM/FM cassette, 2" 
receiver hitch. (414) 
689-6454 ovonrngs. 



CUTLASS SU- 

1991, 6-cyllnder, 

door, clean, very 

dtUon. $7,300. (647) 



6000 1987, 4- 
i owner, weB maln- 
>wer steering, power 
wwer windows, air, 
jger. (647) 740-2035. 




t Grcat 
America! 




Four Ihed Drive 
Jeeps 



FORD BRONCO 1987, 
EDDIE BAUER PACKAGE. 

ATR, 4X4, NC t $4,300, (815) 
568-7468. 

1994 S-10 4-DOOR, rod 
and groy Blazer, all powor, 4- 
wd, loather Interior, 46,000 
mllos. $16,700. (706) 
049-3946. 

FORD BRONCO XLT 1989, 
everything etoctrtc, power and 
A/C, remote control, CO play- 
or, 4-wheel drive, tit wheel, 
crulso control. $8,995. (815) 
344-0522. 

ISUZU 1989 IMPULSE 
TURBO, automatic, loaded, 
handling by Lotus, sports car 
fun, Japanese reftabfllyl Nicer 
than Cellca GT or 240-SX. 
Service records. $4,600. (414) 
551-7072. 



834 


Trucks/Trailers 



1966 GMC 1/2-TON 

PICKUP TRUCK 

Shortbed. step-side, 

big 6-cylndor with 4-6peed 

Radial tires, CB, AM/FM 

cassette. Camper top. 

Runs excolont. Some rust. 

Asking $2,300. 

Altar 6pm 

Gal (647) 740-4978. > . 

1986 FORD DUALLY, 460 
onglne, $10,000. (647) 
949-1651. 

CHEVY PICKUP SIDE- 
STEP 350, 1978, black, 3M 
ton, abort bed, automatic, 
110,000 miles. $l,000/beat. 
CHEVY PICKUP DIESEL 
FULL SIZE 1981, 1 ton, au- 
tomatic, 91,000 miles, 
$1,500/be&t. JEEP COM- 
MANDO with plow, 
$1,000/best. INTERNA- 
TIONAL SCOUT With plow, 
$1,000/best. For mora Infor- 
mation call (708) 710-3995 
leave message or call Sua at 
(708) 205-9554 6am-4pin. 

DODGE RAM MINI 4x4, 
1968, 5-speed. Very dean 
truck Inside and outside. 
$3.600A>O8t. (414) 537-4386. 

DODGE RAM PICK-UP 
TRUCK 1983, very dean, li- 
tis rust, excellent condnion. 
Runs great. Includes 
Cap.$1,SO0. (847) 567-7478. 

FORD 1968 RANGER 

SUPER CAB, 5-spood, 

$3,200/bost. (414) 942-7015 

evenings. 



838 


Henry Equipment 



3RD RANCHERO, 
y, H.I.P.O. 302, au- 
T-BIrd Intorlor, runs 
ag whoets, AM/FM 
aw tires, englno do- 
noeds finishing, 
tst. (647) 223-7099 



1984 LT 9000 Tandem Axle 
Dump, 350 Cummlnd, 13- 
speed transmission, equipped 
with 10ft. Western hydrotum 
plow. Asking $23,000/bost. 
(414) 652-6477. 



844 


Motorcyrlcs 



FORD PICK-UP 

Factory now, guar- 
rom $1,300. Doors 
9.00, fenders from 
•eds from $800, bed- 
169.00. BUMPERS. 
REPAIR PANELS, 
ABRASIVES, WIND- 
i, RADIATORS. DeUv- 
?3 217-824-6184. 

ENGINES 302 re- 

|5 rebuilt Chevrolet 

Ion, used available, 

with 90 day warranty 

] complete brake work 

[motive repair. (847) 

|> Mike's Automotive 

r Repair In Zion. 



i 



■ 

I 
I 






ii 



19B5 KAWASAKI VULCAN 
700. Excottorrt condition. Ask- 
ing $2,000. Call Matt (647) 
625-6144. 

198S KAWASAKI VUL- 
CAN, $1,950/bost. (647) 
336-1935 ask for John. 

DUAL SPORT 1887 Yama- 
ha XT 350. Geared for otl 
road, full englno rebulled, 
after maricet muffler, MOTO-X 
Ores, and many other extras. 
Must ride to appreciate. 
$1,40CVbest. CaH Pete (M7) 
223-6088 evenings, (847) 
6234400 days. 

HONDA GOLDWIN G 

1975. Very good srvipo, 
$1,000/llrm. (414) 843-2835 
after 5pm, before 9pm. 



'"■ '..-'.:, -_vi> '_::.: :.',". • ... .-.:..-.; 



y 



■ 



I 






A P niM9, 1996 UIceIancI Newspapers WHEEL DEALS 



Don GarUts — 

Engine 'ping 9 may be caused by 
[excessive carbon build-up 



IDON GARLITS 

Q. We have a 1 989 Toyota that we 
ught new in 1990. At around 30,000 
iles my thermostat went bad. Since 
his incident, the car pings when the 
ngine warms up. I have tried fuel of 
very kind plus additives, but with no 
uccess. My deafer has said he cannot 
nd the problem. What do you think? 

Robert G. 
Allentown, Ra. 
A. I believe it's coincidental that the 
Inging started when the thermostat 
ent bad. I suspect that the com- 
stion chambers have excessive car- 
n in them, causing the "pre-ignition" 
at in turn is causing the pinging. The 
ick and expensive way to correct this 
Ito remove the cylinder head and 
jrind the valves. There are some fuel 
brands and additives that will remove 
the carbon over a period of time if the 
Hflld-up is not too severe. 

pQ. I have a 1 984 Chrysler Cordoba 
with over 150,000 miles on the car and 
30,000 miles on the current motor. The 
motor, a 1978 225 super six, came 
from a junkyard and I had it totally 
rebuilt. I did, however, use the single 
barrel carburetor and intake from the 
original motor. Recently, I purchased a 
rebuilt Carter double barrel from 
Chrysler and put it on with the proper 
intake! Now I am getting 12 miles per 
gallon compared to 18 to 20 with the 
Holjey single barrel. I've taken it into 
the^garage twice, but they have said 
r. .this is the best they can do and still 
jjjfiake it run right. Spark plugs, wires, 
distributor, ECR, etc. are all new and 
check out fine. Nothing else has been 
changed. Was that a bad carburetor or 
was trjat year motor a real gas hog? I 
like my car, but the gas mileage is 
killing me! 

Sylvia T. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
jA.The 1978 motor will definitely 
; use more gas than the 1985, plus you 
put on twice as much carburetion. This 
Kill also decrease the mileage! Also, a 
^Better, more powerful engine will tend 
Bo cause the driver to "lead foot" the 
gear. My suggestion, if mileage is impor- 
tant: Put the single-barrel carburetor 
[back on the engine, retune it and drive 
[real easy. Your mileage should improve. 

Q. I have a 1992 Honda Accord LX 
When I take my foot off the gas pedal, 
it lopes, bumps or jumps. This always 
happens. Most of the time when it 
shifts into second it jumps noticeably. 



When I took it into Honda, they adjust- 
ed the transmission and suggested that 
I drive it on the "three" setting when in 
town. Otherwise, the action is normal 
for this car, they said. I don't believe it. 
This is my fourth Accord and I've never 
had this trouble with any of the others. 

Catherine P. 
Ocala, Fla. 
A. Believe me, this is not normal. I 
would get some management involved 
in your service dilemma, especially if 
you are a regular Honda customer. 

Q. Since June 1994, 1 have experi- 
enced a vibration while driving my 
1 990 Ford at speeds of 50 mph or 
higher. I noticed it when returning 
home after having the wheel bearings 
repacked, among other things, at the 
dealer's service garage. When I took it 
back, I was told that I probably needed 
new tires. Once I had that done, the 
vibration seemed to be reduced. I had 
only three tires replaced, as they said 
that one of the wheels was still good, 
or at least had good tread remaining. 
Both the dealer and the tire company 
could sense the vibration but disagreed 
on the cause. I returned to the tire 
dealer and was told that the previously • 
good rear tire was in fact bad. The 
tread was good, but the tire was bad 
structurally. I would appreciate your 
opinion on what it may be. 

; Margaret S. 
Vera Beach, Fla. 

A. You. did not indicate whether you 
replaced the "almost new" tire. I would 
have replaced all four tires, thus 
removing the possibility of leaving a 
faulty tire on the car. A frozen brake 
caliper can cause the vibration that you 
described, as can an improperly 
installed wheel bearing, bent rims, out- 
of-round tires (even new ones), or a 
bad driveshaft. Depending on the 
severity of the vibration, you may find 
it not worth the frustration of pursuing 
it. Personally, I wouldn't tolerate much 
vibration at all, because it tends to hurt 
other components on the car, such as 
shocks, bushings and ball joints, to say 
nothing about what it does to the joy of 
driving! 

Editor's note: "Big Daddy" Don Car- 
iits answers technical questions of gen- 
eral /nferesf on automobiles, but can- 
not make personal replies. His answers 
are intended to point out possible solu- 
tions to problems and may not apply in 
every case. Send your questions to Don 
Gartits, in care of this newspaper. 

01 996 Tribune Media Services, Inc. 



-High performance 



From C9 

earth moving equipment. Design 
changes that once took between six 
and nine months to test and implement 
with computer-aided design blueprints 
and full scale wooden models, can 
now be made, at great savings, in less 
than one month. As a result, the com- 
pany will introduce improved models 
of wheel loaders and back hoe loaders 
by 1996. 
Better combustion 

Researchers from the University of 
Texas at Austin are using the expertise 
and resources of the University's High 
Performance Computing Facility to 
study the effects of automobile pre- 
ignition more commonly known as 
engine knock in internal combustion 
engines, with the aim of improving 
combustion technology. Supercomputer 
modeling and computational fluid 
dynamics are used to examining inter- 
nal chemically reacting flows, piston 
movements, and flame action in com- 
bustion chambers. 



The research is conducted by the 
University's Foundation for Combustion 
Sciences and Automotive Research Lab, 
funded by General Motors. More com- 
plete unaerstanding of the combustion 
process can improve engine designs, 
increase fuel efficiency and reduce air 
pollution from auto emissions. 

In order to remain globally competi- 
tive, the automotive companies must 
continue to rely on supercomputing 
technology. However, there is a 1 to 
1 5 year development cycle from major 
idea to commercial success, and few 
companies, larger or small, will risk 
that long-term investment. But they will 
use proven concepts from pre-commer- 
cial research to improve products and 
maintain their competitive edge. They 
will look to the academic supercom- 
puting community for expertise in solv- 
ing complex problems that the centers 
and national labs are best equipped to 
handle, and for developing the future 
generations of high performance com- 
puters that will ensure ongoing success. 



z= 



£rr- 



WHILE OTHER DEALERS TALK. 

WE DELIVER!!! 





«J0l TOOT KIT 



us coumrs ukbt vouhh ansa ramovra dodh mki iiucikaib 



COUPON 



BUY AT INVOICE, 




l '■' m .-"4 



SANDY 



M C KIE 



FOX LAKE. IL 



GOOD WITH THIS COUPON ONLY. 
EXPIRES 4/23/96. 



What more can we say? 
Every LHS, Concorde, 
Intrepid, Cirrus/Stratus, 
Sebring Coupe, Avenger, 
Neon, Stealth, Conversion 
Van, Ram Van, Dakota, 
Short Wheel Base 
Voyager & Caravan, Ram 
2 Wheel Drive Pickup will 
be sold at invoice. Plus 
you receive all eligible 
rebates from Chrysler. 



COUPON ------- J 



SANDY McKIE 



• ALWAYS THE 



All Top Quality, Safety Inspected 



COURTEOUS 
ATMOSPHERE 

• WE MAKE 
CAR BUYING 
FUN AGAIN. 



•HIGHEST 

NEGOTIATIONS RtWM ™DE-IN 

• NO HASSLES hi i " h i IT nih il J ALLOWANCES 

LAKE COUNTY'S LARGEST 

CHRYSLER - PLYMOUTH - DODGE 

AND DODGE TRUCK CENTER 



, ABBOTT, AUSTATE, BAXTER, 
MEMBERS WECLOME! 



91 S. RT. 12 - FOX URL IL 

SALE HMJRS: M0N.-THUR5. 9 AM-8 PM, 
FRI. 9 Affl-6 PM, SAT. 9 AM-5 PM 

^feANDY 
1v1 c KIE 



FOX LAKE. IL 

1-800-94-DODGE 
. 847-587-6473 



YOU'RE LESS THAN 
25 MINUTES AWAY 



mLAKECENEVA 



SUflLINQTCN 

T ^ PADDOC K LAKE 







WAUKE6AM 



CRYSTAL LAKE 



LAKE JUHICH MUNDELEIN 

BUFFALO GROVE 
FALATtNE , 



#* 









» is can .'.";,., : . .-, mi T/j-aU:! aw ,?r jin«A 

WHEEL DEALS UkElANd NewspApcus Apnil 19, 1996 





• SUPER SELECTION! 

• SUPER SAVINGS! 

• SUPER SERVICE! 



E'RE THE VAN EXPERTS 

• Conversions • Hi Cube Vans • Suburbans • G-20 Vans • Cargo Vans • Astro Vans 






-~ ' 




T. ~ T 


3sjl 


1 is 


SHWIHHrj ,.., .j.-..-,,- i-^^^^P^^^ 







Custom Craft High top Astro 

SAVE $ D0,<000 



'95 Midwest 110" G-Van 

SAVE $8,500 



'95 Eclipse Hightop 125" G Van 

SAVE $ 12,000 



'96 Eclipse Astro . 

SAVE $80,000 




-* $ 

_ / * 


aajftjiiu-Li "v - 

■' Wrfi*r'-' ; ft 


■"'■■'"■ -' ■ : J 


.^nf©/^ 


1 




'96 Centurion Ex Cab Dually 4x4 

SAVE $5,000 



'96 Midwest 51 Ex Cab 2 W 

SAVE $4,000 



'96 Starcraft Blazer 4 Dr. 4 x 4 

SAVE $5,000 



'96 Choo Choo Customs Ext. Cab 2VVD 






SAVE $6,000 




3f 




^3 

;fflB 
551 


tBRWtS&P 





Archer Astro 4 WD 

SAVE $9,000 



'95 Gemini 125" G Van 

SAVE $10,000 



Holiday Astro 

SAVE $9,000 



'96 Custom Craft S10 2WD 

SAVE $5,000 



THIS IS JUST A SMALL SAMPLE OF OVER 500 USED CARS, TRUCKS & VANS AT RgCKENBACH! 



CAR SPECIALS 



91 Pontiac Sunblid 


$7,495 


92 Caprice Classic 


$10,995 


95 Cavalier Z24 


$14,950 


95 Bulck Riviera 


$25,695 


94 Saturn 8L2 


$11,995 


95 Chev Monte Carlo 


$15,995 


95 Mazda 626LX 


$13,495 


83 Volte Fox B14 


$8,995 


93 Chevy Cavalier 


$7,495 


94 Chev Corvette 


$24,995 


92 Pontiac Sunbird 


$6,995 


92 Toyota Tercel 


$6,495 


91 Nissan Maxima 4DR 


$12,995 


92 Chevy Beretta 


$7,495 


94 Chev Cavalier 


$9395 


94 Ford Mustang 


$10,495 


95 Nissan Sen tra 


$10,995 


96 Cavalier Coupe 


$13,975 



88 Pontiac Formula 


$4,885 


95 Chevy CC2500PAJ 


$18,995 


93 Ford Escort 


$5,995 


90 Caravan Van 


$4,950 


95 Chevy Lumina 


$12,495 


95 Chevy Tahoe 4x4 


$27,950 


90 Ford Mustang 


$7,995 


95 Chev S-10 Blazer 


$22,950 


91 Chevy Caprice 


$8,495 


.95 Chev Astro 


$14,950 


94 Pontiac Sunbird 


$8,995 


95 Chev Suburaban 


$27,995 


92 Bonneville SSE 


$12,950 


94ChevCK1500P/Uext 


$18,995 


95 Chevy Beretta 


$12,495 


92 S-10 Blazer 4x4 


NEW 


95 Ford Escort 


$8,495 


93 S-10 Blazer 4x4 4Dr. 


RED 


93GeoPrizm 


$8,995 


94 Suburban Silverado 


$23,995 


94 Saturn 


$10,495 


92ChavCK1500extcab 


$13,995 


92 Pontiac Bonneville 


$10,495 


95 Astro Ext 


$15,550 






93 Chevy 4x4 ext P/U 
95 Chevy 4x4 ext P/U 


$18,450 






$22,995 


TRUCK SPECIALS 


93 Chevy S-10 Blazer 


$14,850 


r 




94 GMC 4x4 ext P/U 

94 Chevy C1 500 P/U 


$18,995 
$15,750 


92 Ford Explorer 4Dr. 


$13,630 


91 Chevy P/U 4x4 


$10,995 


- 93 S-10 Blazer 4Dr. 4x4 


$15,995 


93 Chevy P/U 4x4 


$12,495 


90 Mazda MPV Van 


$9,395 


93F150PAJXLT 


$13,795 


95 Chevy K1500 


$21,950 


88 S10 Blazer 4x4 


$31,995 


91 Ford Explorer 


$13,750 



OUTLET CENTER 



WHOLESALE TO THE PUBLIC 

1 \ll milts West ol Rockenbach Superstore 

SjkiHaun: MunFnS*m. >|#JK W9»nv -if.n,. 

84 Chev Cavalier' WGN S99 



And Of Course We Have Over 500 New Cards To Choose From: 

• Cavaliers • Corvettes • Luminas • Suburbans • Camaros 

• Tahoes • Berettas • Impalas • Stake Trucks * Trackers • Caprice 

• Blazers • G-20 Vans • Monte Carlo • S-Series 



65 Ford Escort 


S199 


63 Chrysler Lebaron 


S399 


84 Toyota Camry 


S495 


83 Bulck Elec LTD 


S499 


75 Olds Delta 88 


S595 


86 Toyota Tercel 


$699 



84 Pontiac Grand Prix S795 

86 Chevy Spectrum $799 

87 Chevy 510 P/U ' $895 
83 Ranger.4x4 $995 
85ChevCavConv $1495, 
80 C20 Crew Cab P.U. $1995 
75 INT Losnstar OVMP S2995 
94 Hyundai Excel $2995 

88 Ply Voyager $2995 
87 GMC Jimmy 4x4 S3995 
77 GMC 24 Motorhome $4995 




7 Miles West OfTheTri-Slate (I-94) On Rte. 120 (Belvidere Rd.) 



Chicagolands Chevy Superstore In Grayslake 





24 Hours - 7 Days 
It's A Free Call... CaB NOW!! 



YOUR COMPLETE COMMERCIAL 
VEHICLE HEADQUARTERS 

)* Cab Chassis 
• Hi-Cubes 
• 1 Ton Cargo Van 

• Dump Trucks 
t : * Stake Bodies 

• Utility Bodies 



SALES HOURS: MON-FW: 9AM-9PM SAT:9AM-6PM 
SEUVCIE HOURS; UON-FRI: 7AU-9PU SAT 7:3OAU-3:30PU 



§AST OF RT. 83 & WEST OF U94 ON RT. 120 





Commercial Vehicles 

In Stock! SAVE THOUSANDS! 



Sb Habla Espanol • Mowlmy Po Polsku 



* Plus Tax, Title. Licenseand Oac Fee. Includes Rebate. 



-y, _ „ r „ .«, ,.„ ,.:, 






tfTTi i "'" — *- 



Apftil 19, 1996 LaIccUnc] Newspapers C 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full Time 



Christmas Around * 
The World * 

K Htm BMm t mp a rvt— r i * 

IZ FT/PT houi a available, Beat a 
IT programs In the bualneu. a 
[a Bl-flngunl helpful Spanish a 
*4 catalog also available, a 

|a («47) «e7-e*«* A 



Ibbbdhhhhhbbbbbbb 
g SHEETMEIAL g 
IB APPRENTICE 



illVAC 



fffl 



[Mice willi t mini- 



ADVERTISING 
ASST. 

I To service existing I 
clients, pickup ads, do 
copy layout. Also sell- 
ing and phone work. 
Need own car. Lake 
County, IL area. No 
exp nee. For friendly, | 
outgoing person. 



E mum of Uo 2 yean eiperieKt. H 
.Ellulc knowledge of tbeet tneUlg 
IsMiyout A ImtillrJioo required. S 

'lK t ;^*a:5 1(847) 948-99081 



} motivated, A eoerietJe pertoa 



•B 

Call g 

|g NORTHERN AIR B 
: E SYSTEMS INC. g 

IE (847)223-8877 g 

jBEBBBBBBBBBBBBBB 

^•SECRETARY 

FAST GROWING worrwV* 
fa*hlon company In BUFFAUO 
GROVE hat an axcWng oppor* 
tunlty handBng multiple task* In 
fast paced arrvtronmertt of it* 
Sale* Support Dept 

REQUIRES otrong word pro- 
c*s*lng skills, including 
Madntath and/or Window*; 
several year* administrative 
experience; flood communlca- 
donaUb. 

BENEFITS Include health 
Insurance. 401(k), vacation oftor 
e month*, dothlng aitowwee/ 
discount, summer hours. Fax 
847-485-0965 or mall resume 
with salary requirements to: 
Human Resources, 1485 Busch 
Parkway, Buffalo Grove, IL 
60089. (EOE) 



MECHANIC 
CLASS I & II 

Outstandng oppty nr La* Voqm, 
KV. Echo Bay Resort, a concession 
M the Nan Park Service, b toefC on 
beautiful Lake Mead. Low cost hous- 
ing a utilities aval, w/sasy trans- 
portation to some of the finest 
schools In the area. No State 
Income Tax. Applications are new 
being accepted. Prefer exp. on 
OMC/Mereury Marine engines. Exc. 
benefits IncTdg medcaVdantal. For 
application call: 702-304-4000. Pre- 
srnptoyment drug test wqfjd EOE. 



] 



FlE4C!HE^ 

" Needed for Christian ■ 
Preschool Daycare 
Center. Full Time. 
Good benefits. . 

Call Robin 
■ or Bhara ■ 

1(847)360.9042 J 

tar"" ■ ~vna 

SNow Accepting J 
Applications 1 



SMppocmoom « 
P/T Service IN** i 
i Cashier fi 

Bakery Dept. 

DeUDepc 

Produce Dept. 

Trimratf 

Gumee 

1 5330 W.Grand Ave. | 

' Gumee t 

C 847-662-0700 S 



I 



\ 



Account 

Executive 

National business pub- 
lication has Immedi- 
ate openings for 
dynamic self-starters 
looking for an oppor- 
tunity to earn S50K+ a 
year In outside sales. 
90 day training salary. 
Commission and 
bonuses. Previous 
sales helpful but not 
required. To apply 
anytime call 1-800- 
816-7946 ex. 2311. 



HVAC-R 
SERVICE 

Professional 

Large Midwestern service compa 
ny Is looking for a lop-notch 
Service Professional. Due to our 
rapid expansion A growth, our 
Milwaukee branch Is looking to hire 
someone outstanding. If you are 
the kind of person that likes a fast- 
paced, light commercial environ- 
ment & likes to work Independently, 
then wo want to talk to you. In 
return for your quality work, you wUi 
receive a great wage, benefits & 
the opportunity to grow with an 
excellent company! if you think you 
have what II takes, please call 
Stevo at 414-278-8001, MILWAU- 
KEE MECHANICAL. 17835 W. 
Uncoln Ave., New Berlin, Wl 
53148. 



RETAIL SALES 

Tuesday Morning Is hiring for 
Sales/Stock retail positions at the 
blowing locations: Northbrook a 
WlnnetkJL Flexible hour*. Great 
discount on quality merchandise 
Frequent time off. Chain offer* fun 
part-tSmo work for energetic outgo- 
ing Individuals. Assistant Manager 
position In Wkmotka also available 
Please call Erin at Northbrook 
(847) 205-8010 or Laura at 
Wlnnetka (B47) 448-2510. | 



Experienced 

Photographer 

Wanted 

Leading area Photography 
Studio It looking for a motivat- 
ed, detail-oriented, Wedding 
photographer to Hart right awav. 
Experience h necessary, knowl- 
edge of and experience with 
medium format equipment Is a 
plus. Samples of your work and 
references should be brought 

Call for an interview 
appointment 

(847)356-8136 



Leasing 
Consultant 

needed for apartment com' 

Ktex In Woodstock area 
fust assist in the rental of 
apartments, collections, 
loose renewals & tenant 
relations. Weekend work 
accessary. Good benefits. 

Call 
(708) 932-6666 



SURVEYORS 

Held crew position 

Call 

(847) 548-6600 

or send resume to: 

1TW Surveying 

& Mapping 

438 Patricia CL 
GraysLtkc, n. 60050 



auto painter! 

Need exp'd Auto Body 

Painter. Good pay + 

good bene Ht. 

BELVIDERE 
AUTO BODY 

1705B«4victore 

(Rt, 120) 

Waukogan 

(847) 249-1177 



Circulation 
Manager 

Immediate opening 
Experienced Circulation 
Manager wanted for 
rapidly growing national 
bi-weekly business publi 
cation. Fax resume to 

Business Locator 

(847) 680-9492 



225 



Business 
Opportunities 



LOG HOME DEALERSHIP. 
Excellent earning potential! 
Part or full time. Protected ter- 
ritories, leads, training. Sell 
kits, dry-Ins or turnkeys. Must 
purchase or sell a model start- 
ing at $10,425.00. Cal C.T. 
McFarland, Southland Log 
Homes, 500-845-3555. 

PURCHASE DISCOUNT- 
ED VACATION Certificates 
for personal use at $540 wild 
referral fees paid dally. Largo 
additional Income possible. 
For exciting details call 1*800- 
732*2803 oxt. 8169. 



Check This 

Section 
Each Week! 




Business 
Opportunities 



HEY BOSS I 



Tavern In operation 
w/two apartments 

above for sale, j 
Reduced $165,000 
Round Lake 
■(847)546-3314- 



t 



Opportunity 
Knocks 

Here's your chance to Join 
a fast growing telecom- 
munications co. '' Make 
money without losing your 
personal freedom. Call 
todayl 

(847) 639-1375 

— *-**-^-**. *» * ■» m ir— 



'«»Mu«a.ritii 



228 


StuaM oas Wanted 



CLEANING FOR SMALL 
OFFICES. Reasonable rates. 
Local areas. (847) 623-4303 
leave message. 

DOMESTIC SERVICES 

Let me make your life easier! 

Cleaning, laundry, errands, 

etc. Weekly or Bi-wooWy. 

(708) 

817-1 18S. 

LOOKING FOR EXISTING 
RESTAURANT KITCHEN 
ONLY to rent In the Chain 
O' Lakes area. Please call 
Marty Hong (847) 5B7-4300. 

TWENTY-FOUR HOUR 

CARE and/or respite care 
provided for the elderly. C. 
Gaines, R.N. (847) 746-1021. 



240 



Child Care 



240 


Child Ore 



240 



Child Cue 



LOVING RESPONSIBLE 
PERSONio care for 3 energe- 
tic sons, 6yrs.&3yr. old twins, 

In our Undonhurat homo. Non- 
smoker. Own car. Light house- 
keeping. 0:30am-3:30pm, 
Monday-Friday. (847) 938- 
3848. 

LOVING FAMILY HOME 
DAY CARE. Ucenso applod 
lor. 7am*6pm, 1-syra. Abo be- 
fore/alter school. Ingleslde. 
(847) 587-5275. 

LITTLE TREASURES 
HOME DAYCARE 

Two f uMlmo openings 

Special price 4th week 1/2 off. 

(847) 546-2410. 

MUNDELEIN DAYCARE- 
HOME has 1 ful-tlme open- 
ing. Largo playroom, fenced 
yard, Iota of TLC. Specializing 
in Infant care. (847) 
949-6184. 

NANNY NEEDED TO LIVE 
In Fox Lake home, care for Inf- 
ant and Syr. old, room, board 
plus salary, weekends off. 
(847) 587-6233 evenings, 
(312) .604-2952 days. 



ROCK-A-DYE BABY, 
6/MONTHS & up, referenc- 
es, day and evenings avail- 
able Public Aide woicomo. 
(847) 785-6535. 

TENDER CARE. EXPERI- 
ENCED home daycare pro- 
vider has fullrpart-tJrno open- 
ings In my Round Lake Beach 
home. Moais/snacks provided. 
(847) 548-2575. 

WILL BABYSIT IN my Zlon 
homo, FT/PT, 1-btock from 
school. Ages 2-6. Lunch and 
snacks provided. (847) 
746-5010. 

WILL PROVIDE 

FULL/PART-TIME care, 

6/wooks and up. Mom of 3, 
clean, safe and loving home. 
$65/wock, meals. (647) 
625-0821 Andrea. 



250 



School/Instruction. 



COMPUTER TRAINING, 

AFFORDABLE Instruction 
for children and adults, as wef 
as system set up, configura- 
tion and trouble shooting. In 
your home or office. Git cortm- 
cates are available. (847) 
360-8120. 




SCOTT ANTIQUE MAR- 
KET 1000 Antique Exhibitor 
Booths, Apr! 27 & 28 monthly 
November thru June, Ohio 
State FalrgrourxJs-Colurnbus, 
Onto 1-71. Exit 17lh Ave. (614) 
569-4112 



301 


Antiques 



Check This 

Section Each 

Week! 



BABYSITTER NEEDED IN 
my Round. Lake Beach home, 
hours vary, some evenings, 
occasional weekends. (847) 
546-2033. 

BABYSITTING BEACH 

PARK mom. Limited open- 
ings, non-smoker, 1st shift 
available. References avail- 
able. (847) 249-0828. 

BACK-UP BABYSITTER 
WANTED for vacations and 
llness, for (2) 3yr. olds and (1) 
6yr. old. My Mundoteki home 
or yours. (647) 949-1279. 

CHILD CARE IN my Haryan 
Farms Home In Graystake. AI " 
ages. Prices negotiable. At 
your convenience. (847) 
223-6165. 

CHILD CARE/HOUSE- 

KEEPER IN Highland Park 
home. Flexible hours. 
Days and Saturdays. Eng- 
lish apealdng, own trans- 
portation. Approximately 
$2007we«*. (847) 

831-0696, pager (708) 
901-5777. 

COME PLAY WITH us In 

our Waukegan piayroom, Iknl* 
ed apace avallabto. Must be 2 
& up. Meals Included. 
$55/week. Jackie (708) 
244-3505. 

DAY CARE PROVIDED by 

Icensed practical nurse wtth 
6yra. experience In Early Child- 
hood Education. Plenty of sto- 
ries, art projects and other 
structured activities dairy. 
Evening chid care also avail- 
able. Mundeleln area. (847) 
566-0372. 

EXPERIENCED, LI- 
CENSED PROVIDER has 
openings In her Home Day- 
care Program. Ages 
18/months & up, full-time only. 
Country Walk/Round Lake 
Beach. Call Debbie (847) 
265-1514 after 6pm. 

GURNEE MOM WILL care 
tor your chid In her home. 
(847) 655-1372. 

LINDENHURST-MARY 
POPPINS, MRS. Doublffre 
and Mary Loul 2 full-time 
openings 6:30am-5:30pm, 
starling 6/1/06. Safe, loving 
developmental daycare for 
your precious child. (847) 
356-1982. 

LOVING, RELIABLE, NON- 
SMOKER parenls, college 
educated In child care and de- 
velopment, 14yrs. experience. 
Lots ol toys, stones, projects, 
In our clean new home, 
snacks, excellent references. 
Spring Grove/Richmond area 
(oft 173, east of Rl. 12). (81S) 
875-1143. 



Chicago Antique Toy 
Doll World Show 

Sunday, April Z8th 8:30am - 4pm 

1 000 DEAXERS PLUS 
KANE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS 

RANDEL RD. SOUTH OF RT. 64 

ST. CHARLES, IL 
Adults $5 • Children 1 2 and under FREE 

(847) 526-1645 

FREE PARKING 



304 


Appliances 



330 



Garage 

Rummage Sale 



ELECTRIC DRYER, LIKE 
NEW, tWO. (847) 548-0396. 

WHITE ELECTRIC STOVE 
36". Excelerrt condition. $125. 
Habla Espanol. (847) 283- 
1648 after 6pm.. 



314 



Building Materials 



-MUST SELLII! 7 All steel 
buildings 24 I X28', 30*40*. 
40*60', 50*X72\ 50-X96", 
60*120', 70x150'. Discounts 
up to 45%. Spring or Summer 
Delivery. 1-600-866-2784. 



3 STEEL ARCH 
BUILDINGS, NEW 

40x30 was $6,150 now $2,990 
40x56 wu SHUM now $5,990 
50x96 w»JI7,850 now $9,990 

END WALLS AVAILABLE 

1-800-745-2685 



318 



Business 
Office Equipment 



STORE CLOSING SALE. 
Stock, kilns, pouring equip- 
ment, molds, shelves, tables, 
chairs, (oridft and more. Lei- 
sure Craft Ceramics, 3418 
Kehm Blvd., Park Cly. (847) 
336-5780. 



320 



Electronics 
Computers 



MACINTOSH COMPUTER 

SPECIALIST OFFERS: 

'Networking 

*Data Recovery 

'Now & Used Computers 

•Memory Upgrades 

•Hard Disk Drives 

•Printers 

Free Initial onsle consultation. 

Can (847) 395-7229. 

SMITH CORONA WORD 
PROCESSOR. 3700 office 
system. Like new. $150. 35mm 
Olympus camera, wide lens, 
winder, case, flash, $250. 
(847)680-6484. 



324 


Farm Guide 



FOR SALE HAY & STRAW. 
Hay first cutting Alfalfa, $2.50 
per bale. Straw $2.00 per bale. 
Large Bales. (847) 395-8459, 
(414) 857-6477. 



GARAGE SALE SATUR- 
DAY APRIL 20TH, 8AM-4PM. 
Enter Country Walk Subdivi- 
sion off Monavtle Rd. West of 
83, turn right at Acorn Dr., 
then toft at Acorn Ct. Round 
Lake Beach. Daybed, lamps, 
sewing machines, paintings, 
-glassware, chldrens clothing. 
tons of Avon and tots more. 
(847)265-0099. 

LIBERTYVILLE 252 
GREENTREE Parkway. Bed- 
room set, desk, lamps, tots of 
golf equipment, lawn care 
equipment, houseware, many 
miscellaneous Items. April 
20th & 21 st. 9am-5pm. (847) 
548-0223. 

MOVING SALE APRIL Fur- 
niture, Quasar TV, Sony/Cellu- 
lar phones, stereo, furs, de- 
signer clothes (men, women, 
children), toys, boys bikes, 
aquarium, acoustic guitar, 
golf dubs and more. By ap- 
pointment. Please leave me- 
sage (708) 295-0114. 

MOVING TO CALIFORNIA 
SALE, spa, furniture, bunk 
beds, twin bed, 10-speed 
bikes, boys/mens clothes, 
toys, TV, garden equipment, 
desk, gol dubs, dishes, table 
saw, office equbment, baby 
equipment, and more. Friday, 
Saturday, 4/19 & 4/20, 10am- 
4pm, 4989 Carriage Dr., Gur- 
nee. (847) 623-4050. 

WAUCONDA/LAKE BAR- 
RINGTON, LAKELAND Es- 
tates Subdivision Ga- 
rage/Moving Sale, Thursday, 
Friday. Saturday, 9am-3pm. 
Rt. 176 or Rt. 59 to Anderson 
to Lakeland. Antiques, Collect- 
totos, toys, dothlng, furniture, 
Kirby Vacuum, Singer Sewing 
Cabinet, refrigerator, dryer, 
and much more. 

AFTER YOU'VE HAD YOUR 
BIG SALE, and there Is stHI 
things that kist did not go.... 
Call us al LAKELAND News- 
papers and run I under Ihe 
'FREE or Giveaways* classi- 
fied column. FREE ADS are 
NO CHARGEI (708) 

223-6161, ext. 140. 



Wednesday at 10 a.m. Is the deadline for 
Classified Ads...Don't Forget 



330 



Garage 
Rummage Sale 




FUND RAISER RUMMAGE 
SALE for 1088 Class Reunion 
at Warren Township High 
School on CPIaJne Rd. Satur- 
day, April 27lh. Furniture, 
ctothos, toys, books, knick- 
knacks, and baked goods. 
8:30am-3:30pm. 



RUMMAGE SALE 

Lincolnshire at 

Stevenson High School on 

Rt 22 West of Milwaukee 

Saturday, April 27th 

8am-l :30pm 



1 



St Mary's Annual 
Rummage Sale 

Thursday, April 25th 

9*m-6pni 

Friday, April 26th 

9am-6pm 

(*2BsgD*y) 

SsL, April 27th 

8am- 11 am 

St Mary's School 

Rt. 60 a Erhart Rd. 
Mnsdddn, II 




SHAVINGS 

Hay, straw, feed. 

WE DELIVER) 

(414) 857-2525. 

M-F8-5 

Sat. 8-3. 



340 



Household Goods 
Furniture 



EASY CHAIR, SOFA and. 
Loveseat, Blue, Mauve, 
Cream, $575. LEATHER 
•ofa and loveseat, $950. Ex- ■ 
coders condition, MUST SELL! 
(706)548-1046. 

QUEEN ANNE STYLE bed- 
room, complete $1,100. Din- 
ing room set, $1,700. OAK 
bedroom set $1,200, Oak 
dlnlngroom set $1,980.' 
ALSO Sleigh bedroom set, 
$1,745. All In PERFECT con- 
dition. MUST SELL) 
(708)548-1045. 

BRASS QUEEN SIZE BED 

wtth new oetuxo mattress, still 
In plastic. $250 including 
frame. Elegant Queen Aims 
Cherrywood dlnlngroom set. 
Excelent condlton. Complete 
$1,750. Win deliver. (847) 
374-0882. 

BUNK BEDS, VERY strong, 
$89 & up. L-shaped, stacka- 
btos, lotts, mattresses, all 
types. (847) 623-9469. 

DESIGNER MODEL 

HOME CONTENTS 

Sofa/toveseat set, hunter 
green and cranberry, $595. 
SofaAoveaeal set, earth tones, 
$695. Other sets, plaids, 
stripes, florals, etc. Dining- 
room set, 10-ptoce, $1,595. 
Bedroom sets, etc. (847) 329- 
4119. ' 

RECLINING LOUNGE 

FOR two wtth lumbar vibrator, 
$125. (414) 652-0441. 

SOFA HIDE-A-BED, 
QUEEN size, gray ptoid mate- 
rial. Excellent conrftton. $150. 
Habla Espanol. (847) 263- 
1646 after 6pm. 

TWO QUEEN SIZE WA- 
TERBEDS. Everything Includ- 
ed. $150 each/best. (706) 625- 
9776 after 5pm. 



340 



Household Goods 
Furniture 



SAMSONITE GLASS UM- 
BRELLA TABLE and 4- 
chairs (Includes umbrella). 
Good condlton, $75. Ssmson- 
fle Muftl-tovol lounge deck 
chair, matches table, $50. 
Glass skto table, $10. (847) 
566-2267 after 6pm. 

SEALY ELECTRIC QUEEN 
SIZE BED, brand now, wtth 
massager, wireless control, 
mattress Is sealed, $1,600. 
(847)497-3380. 



348 



Im/Guien 



GARDEN TILLERS TROY 
BILT Rear-TIno Tiers, at tow, 
direct from the factory prices. 
For FREE catalog with prices, 
special SAVINGS NOW IN EF- 
FECT, and Model Guide call 
TOLL FREE 1-600-S35-60Q1. 
DEPT. 14. . 

PRIVACY HEDGE-LIQUI- 
DATION SALE. Cedar-Ar- 
borvlao 3-1/2-4 foot tree. Reg. 
$29.99-Now$8.95. Freedefv- 
ery-12 trees minimum. Also 
avalsble : Birch and Liac. 1- 
800-889-8238. 

RIDING LAWNMOWER, 

$999. Like new, 2yr. warran- 
ty, size 18/46)n. 

COATS 49ERS SUPER- 
BOWL Championship coats, 
$90. Football and baseball 
Starlet/Apex coats, $55. Foot- 
ball caps $12. (414) 
652-0965. 




VENDING MACHINES 11 
TABLETOPS. Three h loca- 
tions, other locations avail- 
able. Brand new condltJon. 
$4,400most. (414) 857-7918 
leave message. 

■■■■■■■■■■■■■rariarirarHrii-fiHi^i^r^i^i^BTPiaTiaiTaTaaBBBBBBa**"""""*""* 

JVC VHS-C 8MM , palmcor- * 
dor win AC adaptor, battery 
charger, 1-battery, RCA Jacks 
and a hard carrying case. Abo 
medium sized black leather 
duster, full length. Cal Matt 
(847) 625-8144. 

ORGAN-LOWREY, $300. 
CHINA cabinet, $100. Ufestyl- 
er Exercise bice, dglal timer, 
$1SO. (414) 857-7918 leave 
message. 

WOLFF TANNING BEDS 
TAN AT HOME Buy DIRECT 
and SAVE! Conrnerdal/Home 
units from $199.00. Low 
monthly payments FREE 
Color Catalog. Call TODAY 
1-80Q-842-13OS. 

WOLFF TANNING BEOS. 
TAN AT HOME. Buy DIRECT 
and SAVE! CorriTierctoJ/home 
units from $199. Low monthly 
payments. FREE color cata- 
log. Cal today 1-800-342- 
1305. 

E REPOSSESSED | 

S Must sdl 2 QUONSCT [T 
O round fled buildings at 3 
g lowcrt pn'ors. One is 30x40. g 
C Never used. Sacrifice. (j 

g 1-800-810-6661 g 

HBBgUOySBHBHBHOa 



354 



Medial Equip 
Supplies 



DIABETIC) FREE SUP- 
PLIES HOME DELIVERY. 
Must have MEDICARE or IN- 
SURANCE, to qualify must 
take Insulin. Sony No HMO*. 
CaU 1-8O0-762-8026 Satisfac- 
tion Guaranteed. Mention 
2152. 




PET OF THE WEEK 



BbrJduk b an 18 month old 
j^mrJeribridormlz. Mostly bbek 

' '•^lilfcwtikmarkir^soQ his chest, 
k iK fed .iod uil tip, this hiodsome brg- 
£ er mid -ste dog ias i km, sturdy 
^1 build ifldishijiy short can 
5|Biid}id lost bis honKwhea his 
a turfy mowd to a oo-ptti buUdlng. 
Blidjid b housebrokeo and ins 
nised with childrto. This lerrfk dog is snarl, ikri lad b up to dale oo 
lib shots, Bladd,id£bjshadttrtKtnli^-faetfc 
well mdb eager to pleise. Blid^bilo^aflectJooale dog with t 
pbr-ful disposltioa ind an rjutgoing persoailily Without t doubt tMs fine 
r^gmls5esris[ijnir/iDdb!oQglngtol)elovdi^ Ubsraikeout- 
sunding Euniiy oriented pets, Te think Blickjick sill be a good bet for 
youJ Cage 55- 

As a gerenl rule, ALL DOGS benefit from basic housebreaking md 
obedience training which helps ihe dog to boodlo t Dewownet Crtticg 
Is recotBTDeoded when the owner b xwayjor the first year to i new borne 
sltuattofl. 

Cash t$$ doaadoa includes free spty/aeuter, collar, tag, leash, first 
shots, foUW-up care and much more. 

Orphans of Ihe Storm Is located at 2200 Rherwoods M, DrxriWd. 
Hours are 11 un. to 5 p.m. seven days a week. Call (847) 945-0235 Tor 
further Information. 



S3 



iiP^ 



»» 




j CLASSIFIED LAkdANd Newspapers Apnil 19, 1996 



358 



Musical Instruments 



CONCERTINA (GLASS). 
104 toy, tul trt>k>, toy of C, A- 
1 shape, $500. (414) 
604-0372. 

INTERNATIONAL GUITAR 
MONTH SALE. Acoustic 
Guitars now $149 and up. 
Eloctric guitars start at $150. 
Blowout pricoo on many Crato 
Amps and apodal introductory 
sale on Lanoy Amps. A Major 
Music, Gurnoo, (047) 
023-6565. 

LOWERY CONSOLE PIA- 
NO, walnut finish, 00 toy- 
board, 3 podoJ, $000. (647) 
672-0412. 

MOVING, MUST SACRI- 
FICE, full tondod Hammond 
Concord organ. Mako offor. 
(847) 602-7300. 



360 



rVtiAaiprJks 



DOG BOARDING- 
WHY LEAVE your "inilo 
Mood* h a p#n wtiia you vaca- 
tion. I can offw dopoodobto, 
rotobh care tor your dogfcup 
hi my horn*. Lola of T.LC. 
Loads of groat rofonmcos and 
ravo reviews. Call or loovo 
mossaQO at (047) S66-6319. 

APRICOT TOY POODLE, 

2-maJos, B/wooks old, 2-makt 
largo toy poodtos, rod. (414) 
552-8051. 

BIRD FAIR 

Aprl2Tst. 

10:30am-5pm, 

South Hlls Country Club 

Banquot Rooms. 

1-94 East FrontagoRd. 

Just North ol Highway 20, 

Raclno. Donation $1. 

Exollc birds of al Wnds. 

Bird aoxlng, capos, food, etc. 

COCKATIEL-LAT1NO, 
BEAUTIFUL, 2A40NTHS 
ok), hand tod, wth cago, $150. 
(414)694-1169. 

COLLIE PUPPIES, 

SPRING beauties, ful coals, 
r&ady to go May 11th, al co+- 
Ofs. $295. (414) 639-0195. 

DO YOU ENJOY working 
*ith animals? Do you have 2 
hours per week to spare? Asst- 
sl Animal Foundation, one of 
the area's no-kll shelers Is 
sooting volunteers tor work 
that ks hfghty rewarding and 
lunt Wo need men and 
women who: can work wtth 
cats and dogs, do igrt repair 
work and can answer phones 
and other office duties. We are 
located In Crystal Lake. For 
more Information please call 
(815)459-0990. 

GERMAN WIREHAIRED 

POINTER PUPS, 6 males, 4 
females, parents on prembes, 
excellent fleldllnes, S200. 
(8151 459-5837. 



4, 



PETS IN 
NEED 

Needs Your Help! 

Following Is a sample of 

soma of the 

anlmala avallaUa 

for adoption: 
German Shepherd, 
Boxer Mtx, Stafford Tenter, 
Blue Healer Mbc, Keoshond, 
Lab, Gordon Setter Mtx, 
Yellow Lab, Border Co lie 
Mtx, Terrier, Koeshond 
Puppy, Mixed Breed Puppy, 
Golden Retriever, 
Afghan Mtx Puppy 
and many othor small. 
medium and large dogs 
for adoption. 

Adopt from a 

shelter 

& receive your 

spay/neuter card. 

Be a responsible 

pet owner! 

JOIN US FOR 

OUR 

WALK-A-THON 

April 29, 1996, 

Moraine Hills 

State Parle 

For Information 

call* 

(815)PAT-1462 

Pets In Need 

Also looking tor 
donation* for 
garage aale and a 
van. All Items are 
tax deductible. 
Please call for de- 
tails. 
No donation too 
smail} 



L 



360 



Pets a Supplies 



368 



Took A 
Machinery 



BOSCH REVEnSIDLE 

DRILL. JtOOVflim. (700) 025- 
0770 aflor 5pm. 



370 



Wauled To Buy 



$10,000 REWARDI I'M 
looking for older Fondor, Gt> 
son, Gmtsch, Martin National, 
Mosrto guitars. Wll pay from 
5100-510,000 for corfoJn mod- 
ols. Please call Crawford 
Whlo 1-000-477-1203, Nash- 
vlb. TN. 

GUNS I 

SHOTGUNS, RIFLES, 

PISTOLS, ANTIOUES. 

(847) 223-5518. 

NEEDED: VICTROLA OR 
OLD CRANK-PHONO, 

MUSIC BOX, JUKEBOX, 
POP MACHINE, TRAIN. 
CASH PAID. (312) 409- 
7127. 




370 



Wanted To Bay 



500 


Homo For Sale 



PURE PITBULL PUPPIES, 
7Avooks old. Leave mossago 
(047)740-1145 aflor 5pm. 

TO GOOD HOME mnlo 

Slomoso houso cat, front do- 
clawod, and neutorod, good 
companion tor single or cou- 

Jlo. (547)600-1000. 



Slot Machines WANTED- 
ANY CONDITION- or Parta. 
Also JUKE BOXES, MUSIC 
BOXES, Nickelodeon and 
Coke Machines. Paying 
CA3HI Call (T08)90S-2742. 

TOP PRICE PAID. Wo pay 
more lor old or scrap gokJ. No 
•mount too smal or too largo. 
(047)430-0125. 

WANTED TO BUY OLD, 
used or broken percussion s> 
slrumonts, l.o. tympanl, xykt- 
phones, cWmos, etc. For ap- 
polntmonl call Jeff (047) 
302-0552. - 

WANTED: TRAIN COL- 
LECTOR BUYS. Lionel, 
Maw, 027, H.O. and Plastto- 
vllo. Top dollar paid according 
to condllon and wonts. Call 
(047) 540-3704 11am-0pm or 
joovo mossago. 

PIANOS WANTED. CASH 
lor any piano under 40in. (al. 
In noed of repair or not. (414) 
240-0401. 




SELL A HOME/BUY A 
HOME. If soling, we have a 
number of interested buyers. If 
Interested In purchasing you 
may qualfy for as Ittb m 3% 
down. Servicing II. A Wl. Jim 
Davis, (000) 747-5547. 

SPRING GROVE, 3-BED- 
ROOMS, 2-baths, raised 
ranch, large woodod lot, 
5147,000. (015) 075-2301. 

FOX CHASE SUBDIVI- 

SION, Grayslake Schools, 
better than new. Complelety 
decorated. Have al upgrades, 
3-bodroom, 1*1/2 baths, large 
klchen, open fbor plan, 2-1/2 
cor, priced below market for 
quick salo. 5132,000 
RENT/OPTION. (047) 
430-0001. 

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 
4721, 1PM-4PM, 27 W. 
COUNTRY WALK DR., 
ROUND LAKE BEACH. At 

syrs. young this 2 story homo 
Is Hkn now, but all the hard 
work has boon dona. You gol 
2-bodrooms, 1.5 baths, 2 car, 
hugo yard, landscaping, fuHy 
docoralod O $1 10,050, F8BO 
(047) 205-1700. 

WATERFRONT ON CHAIN 
O'LAKES, Cozy 3-bodroom 
wtth seporalo IMngroom, d- 
nlngroom, famlryroom, many 
upgrades, 5111,000. Owner 
anxious! (047) 305-0200. 



-POT BELLY PIG, Savannah 
Monitor, golden Tegu. Best 
_ofter. (047) 073-2520. 



WATERFRONT HOUSE 

FOR SALE BY OWNER, 

nice neighborhood on qulot 
channol to Chain, nowty ramo- 
dolod Insldo and out, wtth con- 
trol air, 2-bodrooms, laundry- 
room, now kltchon wtth ap- 
pliances. Bath wtth whirlpool, 
dining and largoroom, over- 
looking water, nlco size yard. 
5134.000. Call for more Infor- 
mation (847) 305-4730 ovon- 
Ings, (047) 305-0505 days. 

INGLESIDE LARGE 3- 
BEDROOM ranch on 
Wooster Lake, Oft. ceilings 
throughout, front and roar 
screened porch, on private 
wooded lot, 575,000. 
RENT/OPTION. (047) 
430-0901. 

INTEREST BREAK HOME 

owners use oquly to pay off 
high Intorost obligations. Bet- 
ter than paying high rates on 
credB cards or other blls and 
get the tax benell. Jim Davis 
(800) 747-5547 Servicing II. & 
WL 

LAKE VILLA INVEST- 
MENT OPPORTUNITY. 
Under construction. Sold as Is. 
Add your finishing touches to 
this 2/3 bedroom ranch, large 
Wtchen, vaulted cellngs, sky 
■ghts. On double lot wlh lake 
rights. 575,000. Wll discount 
lor quick close. (047) 
430-0901. 

LOOKING FOR A TAX DE- 
DUCTION IN 10067 The 
best one may be your own 
homo. We service II. & Wl. You 
may quality for as title as 3% 
down. Jan Davis (000) 747- 
5547. 

BUILDER CLOSING OUT 
HOUSES AT REDUCED 
PRICES! Ready for your fam- 
ly. Al have energy efllclent 
thermopane windows, 2x6 
walls (R-20), R-30 cellngs. 
FINANCING AVAILABLE, 
contract sale, rent/option pos- 
strte on some, 
*McHENRY3-bedroom 
ranch, 2-oaih, 2-car garage, 
vaulted cellngs. 5144,000. 
•LOT 1 acre lot In Windy Prar- 
le Crossings, 545,000. 
CALL BUILDER DIRECT 
AND SAVE ON ABOVE 
HOUSES. (047) 626-6755. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH com- 
pletely remodeled, 3-bodroom 
ranch, large kitchen, living- 
room, famlryroom, full base- 
ment, deck, fenced yard, 1-1/2 
car garage, 503,000. 
RENT/OPTIONI (047) 

436-0901. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH, 
FOX CHASE SUBDIVI- 
SION, Grayslako Schools, 
dramatic calhodral ceilings, Iv- 
Ingroom, dlnlngroom, eat-In 
kitchen and sunken family- 
room, 3-bedroorns, 1-1/2 
baths, 2-1/2 car garage, below 
market price, 5135,000. Must 
seel Open House Saturday & 
Sunday lpm-5pm, 1054 E. 
Fox Chase Dr. (047) 
223-0567. 



TAX BREAK RENTING 
doesn't do It so why not got out 
of an aportmont Into your own 
homo? You may qualfy for as 
Iftlo as 3% down. Servicing II. 
A Wl. Jan Davis (000) 747-' 
5547. 

TIRED OF RENTING? A 

homo b In your reach wth as 
Ittlo as 3% down lor qualftod 
buyers. Servicing II. A Wl. Jim 
Davis (600) 747-5547. 



New tri- level. 3 bttbaotT*. 2 full 
Uthft, firiihed lower Uvd with 
family room. Cathedral celling), 
Wtchen w /pantry itrtuai dam 
off dUrtrifj aiva. 

$112,900 

Gold Star B/E 

Ask for Sanja 
847-6844700x217 



Michael Lescher 

"Your Link to the Chain" 




6 YEARS HEW OH THE CHAIN 

with 4 bedrooms, 3 lull baths, 2 flroplacos. Watch Km aun- 
sot on Rodhoad Loko. Vaulted family room, liardwood 
floors, oak trim, groat mostor sulto w/balcony, 2 car 
garage... $319,000 



Re/Max Advantage 

(847)395-3000 



Lake Villa, EL 

AUCTION 

Sat. May 1 1th, 1996 

LakefronL 2 Homes, 4 Lots 
102 ft, frontage Zoned CJL 

1 acre on Deep Lake. Live & work aX home. Main 

hoe has walk cmt bsmt aet up for cdEce. Call for 

defatted bwa da j g t **»«* bMA*** fajfa wnadon. 

Rich Diamond Auctioneer 

847-587-7047 






NQTJEE 
ZAMPARO and GOLDSTEIN, P.C. 

Attorneys for Plaintiff 
899 Skokie Boulevard, Suite 300 
Northbrook, Illinois 60062 
(647)564-3100 
STATE OF ILLINOIS, COUNTY OF LAKE, SS. - IN THE 
CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL CIR 
CUtT, LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS. CHEMICAL BANK, AS 
TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING 
AGREEMENT DATED AS OF SEPTEMBER 30, 1990, 
SERIES 1990-4, PLAINTIFF v. DeWiTT TOLBERT. SR., 
RUTH TOLBERT, NORTH SHORE SANITARY DISTRICT, 
UNKNOWN TENANTS, UNKNOWN OWNERS and NON- 
RECORD CLAIMANTS, DEFENDANTS, NO. 95 CH 757. 

Public notice Is hereby given that pursuant to a 
Judgment made and entered in said Court in the above- 
entitled cause, the Sheriff of Lake County, Illinois will, on 
Monday, June 3, 1996, at the hour of 9:00 a.m. at 25 
South Uttca, Waukegan, Illinois, sell at public auction the 
following described premises and real estate mentioned 
In said Judgment, situated in Lake County, Illinois, or so 
much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy the 
Judgment, to -wit: 

1239 Greenfield Avenue, Waukegan, Illinois 60085, 
improved with a single family residence. 

Sale shall be under the following terms: 10% down, 
balance within 24 hours. Premises will not be open for 
inspection. 

For Information contact Laurence J. Goldstein, ZAM 
PARO and GOLDSTEIN, P.C, Plaintiffs Attorney, 899 
Skokie Boulevard, Suite 300, Northbrook, Illinois 60062, 
Telephone (847) 564-3100. 

Dated: March 15, 1996. Waukegan, Illinois 



500 



Homes For Silc 



500 



Home} For Sole 



500 


Homes For Sale 



WE BUY HOUSES, any 
nLro, any condition. Fast closo. 
(700)430-0001. 

FOX LAKE/SPRING 

GROVE GUILDERS MODEL 
Deluxe 4-bodroom, co- 
da/Ark*, 2-atory on woodod 
aero, 2-1/2 baths (another 
roughed In), English base- 
ment, 3-csr garage. $10,000 
bolow marks t valuo. 2-fumao- 
as, 2-aJr conditioners, Ihormo- 
pano windows -wtth storms 
and scroora, woodbumlng 
flroplaco, Jocuizl, marina near- 
by. If you qualfy to buy a 
house of this qualfy, Is ready 
to movo Into. Rent optlorVcon- 
tract possible. (647) 520- 
5755. 



Newer home with attached 
garage, 3 bedrooms, 2 full 
baths, located on dead-end 
street 

$102,900 

Gold Star R/E 

Ask for Sanja 



ZAMPARO and GOLDSTEIN, P.C. 

Attorneys for Plaintiff 
699 Skokie Boulevard, Suite 300 
Northbrook, Illinois 60062 
(647) 664-3100 
STATE OF ILLINOIS, COUNTY OF LAKE, SS. - IN THE 
CIRCUIT COURT OF THE NINETEENTH JUDICIAL 
CIRCUIT, LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS. CHEMICAL 
BANK, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND 
SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF JUNE 1, 
1992 SERIES 1992-3, PLAINTIFF v. JOHN STEWART, 
FRANKIE D. HENRY, a/k/a FRANKIE D. STEWART, 
UNKNOWN TENANTS. UNKNOWN OWNERS and 
NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, DEFENDANTS, NO. 95 
CH332. 

Public notice Is hereby given that pursuant to a 
Judgment made and entered In said Court In the above- 
entitled cause, the Sheriff as of Lake County, Illinois will, 
on Monday, June 3, 1996, at the hour as of 9:00 a.m. at 
25 South U tica, Waukegan, Illinois, sell at public auction 
the following described premises and real estate men- 
tioned in said Judgment, situated In Lake County, Illinois, 
or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy the 
Judgment, to-wifc 

1911 Elizabeth Avenue, North Chicago, Illinois 60064. 
Improved with a single family residence. 

Sole shall be under the following terms: 10% down, 
balance within 24 hours. Premises will not be open for 
inspection. 

For information contact Laurence J. Goldstein, ZAM- 
PARO and GOLDSTEIN, P.C, Plaintiffs Attorney, 699 
Skokie Boulevard, Suite 300, Northbrook, Illinois 60062, 
Toiephone (847) 564-3100. 

Dated: April 1, 1996. Waukegan, Illinois 




OPEN hoi si: 



Sunday 
April 21 • 1-4 PM 

219 E. South Lake Shore Dr. 
Mandeleln 

i 4 I to JS—, N.fth %» 



H^t i* Urn Ulm .Um. 

DONT DREAM A 
DREAM, BUY ONE! 

Clean 3 II II ralwl ranch. 
I«rie frncfxMn tanl. Front A 
hack decta, 

IIAIHD A WARNER 

Tmiiiiijr IMlran 

847-263-6 100 



open iiorsi-: 



Saturday 9l Sunday 
April 20 ft 21 • 1-4 PM 

106 S. W«l Ayr, 

Waubatfan 

IWmiumi 1J0 * (ITU** a..ii M 

AWAHO WINNING DESIGN 
ileautiful 1 *lury culuuUI totltt 
ujifraiU* gtWa. 1 )«ar **w, 
VttlUM* uiUiu lu m**Ur buUuuaa 

■ u.1 balk Willi tfcvllata. S|tacbiu* 

■ uj«-r lanllr i*». Par WbuWhm* 
i.im. CULUm Biuuil WiMtilWil A 
Curwt kLhiU. Ckx« (n luUwajr. 

UA1RD & WARNER 

Taiimiy llellran 

847-263-6100 



Case No. 95 CH 672 



Flahar and Rthar Fllo 1 20167 

IN THE aRCUIT COURT OF LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 

COUNTY DEPARTMENT, CHANCERY DIVISION 

Beneficial Illinois, Inc. d/b/a Bonoliclal 
Mortgage Company of Illinois 

v. 

James 0. North a/k/a James D. North, Sr. 
and waile Lao North, Frank Leung, M.D., 
City of North Chicago, North Shore 
Sanitary District and Unknown Owners 
Defendants 
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE 
OUR FILE NO. 28167 
(IT 18 AD VIS ED THAT INTERESTED PARTIES CONSULT THEIR 
flfflM ATTORNEYS BEFORE BtOOfNQ AT FORECLOSURE SALES) 

Public Notice la hereby given pursuant to a Judgment entered 
In tho above entitled cause on January 3, 1096. 

I, Clinton O. GrfnnoJI. Shoflff, of LAKE County, will on May 20, 
1996, at tho hour of 9:00 a.m. at tho Robert H, Babcox Judicial 
Center, 1st Floor Conforonco Room, 25 S. Utlca SL, Waukegan. 
Illinois, sell to tho highest bidder for cash, tho following described 
promises: 

2217 Krlstan, North Chicago, IL 60064 

Tho Improvements on tho properly constat of single family, 
wood framo, 2 story, no garage, located at 2217 Krlstan, North 
Chicago, IL. 

Solo Terms: 10% down by certified funds, balance within 24 
hours, certified funds, no refunds. The sale shall bo subject to 
Qonoral toxos and to special assessments. 

Tho proporty will NOT be open for Inspection. 

Upon tho sale being mado. the purchaser shall receive a 
Certificate of Sale which will entitle the purchaser to a deed on a 
specified date unless the property Is redeemed according to law. 

For Information call the Sales Officer at Plaintiffs Attorneys, 
FISHER AND FISHER. 30 North LaSalle SL, Chicago, IL (312) 
372-4764, from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m., however undor Illinois 
law, the Solos Officer Is nol required to provide additional Infor 
matlon other than that set forth In this notice. 



REMINDER.. 
THE NEW AREA CODE 



FOR OUR AREA IS 



(847) 




GATO DEL SOL L 

Handsome stone veneer trim highlights the tremendous curb appeal ol the exquisite Gato Del Sot 
With the garage extended toward the front, a long walkway leads to the recessed entry. Here, a 
wraparound porch frames a large bay window. Whether you are sitting In the vaulted Irving room, or 
on a porch swing, the surrounding view Is yours to enjoy 

Once Inside this beautiful 2221 square foot home, tho practicality of the unique door design Is evt- 
dsnL Isolated directly behind the living room, the master suite offers complete privacy along with 
such amenities as a generous walk-In closet and private bathroom with twin basins. 

The central section of the plan features a spacious family room heated by a gas fireplace. Any 
gatherings may bo held here In complete comfort A aide door allows access to an expansive cov- 
ered deck. Facing the family room Is the formal dining area. This arrangement lends an openness 
to the entire home that is sure to be appreciated. A U-shaped kitchen has been placed between the 
dining room and the breakfast nook, permitting the cook In the household to serve both formal and 
Informal meats with ease, 

Two good-sized bedrooms share a lull bathroom, and each contains a water basin along with lib- 
eral closot space. If desired, one of the rooms may be converted for uso as a home office, den, music 
room, or library. A game room, secluded to muffle the sound, has room for a billiard table, ping-pong 
or air hockey. For those wanting to keep fit, this Is an ideal place to sot up your exercise equipment, 
a convenient bathroom abuts the game room. 

A serviceable utility room, located by the Inside entrance to the garage, Is a good location for dis- 
carding clothing bolero entering the house. The substantial three-car garage allows you to unload 
groceries Immediately Into the living area. This provides added safety* and yields protection from the 
weather. There Is a large shop space for the hobbyist or do-it-yourself enlhuslasL 

For a study kit of the GATO DEL SOL (335-030), send $10.00, to Landmark Designs, P.O. Box 
2307-LP60, Eugeno, OR 97402. (Be sure to specify plan name and number). For a collection ot plan 
books, featuring our most popular home plans, send $20 to Landmark, or call 1-800-562-1 151. 



] 



L 

3 

[ t 

■ 

d 
5 

a 

h 

i, 

it 

n 
»• 

a. 



». 

2. 



ad 

i°- 

la I 

in, 



ft 

24 
to 



a 
ia 

w. 
rs, 

?> 
Ms 

Dr- 



um 



Apail 19, 1996 UkEUrJd Newspapers CLASSIFIED | 



500 



Homes For Sale 



504 



Homes For Rent 



504 



Homes For Rent 



THE LIVING 

JROOM is nice...; 

jbut the 3 season screened]; 
(porch Is what will Mil you. Itf 
{overlooks a yard full of porsn-, 
CnlQls & could easily bocomo af 
?3rd bodraom. Closo to Fox J 
pLoko schools & shopping &t 
jjonly »7S,9005 

Michael Loscher 

(847) 395-3000 

RE/MAX Advantage 

•Your Link to tho Chain' 



SUNSETS ON 
BLUFF LAKE... 

Sara spoctacular from the mulll- 
Jlevel dock & screen houso that[ 
Twos added to this home In *03.[ 
\A bedrooms, 1.5 baths, now[ 
{basement & 2 garages all tor 
(220,000? 

Michael Leacher 

(847) 740-3930 

RE/MAX Advantage 

"Your Link to tho Chain' 



ROUND LAKE 2-OED- 
ROOM unfurnished lakofront 
homo on Long Lako. Groat 
vlow of lako. Boat OK. No pota. 
$695/monlh. (B47) 428-4312. 

Check This 

Section 
Each Week! 



TWO-BEDROOM LAKE- 

FRONT HOME, Cross 
Lake/Trevor, Wise. Exoilont 
condition, $675/monlh. (047) 

634-3460, (647) 395-9018. 

DRUCE LAKE 3-BED- 
nooMS, wiih In-law apart- 
ment. SSOO/month plus aocuri- 
ty deposit and ullRlos. (847) 
437-0058. 



Wilmot Area 

Spacious 3 BR with cathedral ceilings and fireplace. 2-1/2 car 
dct. gar. on mature 1/2 acre. Walk to community beach on 
Camp Lake! S795/mo. + sec dep. Long Term Lease or Rent 
with Option. $102,000 

Land Management 815-678-4334 




5 1 Condo/Town Homes 



514 



Condo/Tovra Homes 



504 



Homes For Rent 



/AUCONDA 2-BEDROOM 
WATERFRONT duplex/with 

act) rights, $675/morth plus 
irtty deposl, sewer/Water 

Juded. Available Immetfate- 
f. Must be neal and have ref- 
erences. (047) 526-8273 
savo message. 

■■■■■■^■■■■■■■■■■■■BBSSftBtSa^lBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB 

/AUKEQAN VICTORIAN 
JETTING 1 -bedroom apart- 
ts, $450 and up. (647) 
)144. 



ENJOY YEAR ROUND LIV- 
ING win no maintenance wor- 
ries. Nowty remodeled/carpet- 
ed , 2-bedroom, 1-1/2 balh, on 
a private lako. For the dtecrim- 
mlnatlng renter 55yrs. & older. 
Musi see to appreciate the 
amenities of Leisure Village 
Fox Lake. II. (414) 534-6511. 

ISLAND LAKE TOWN- 
HOUSE 3-4 bedrooms, 1-1/2 
baths, 1-car garage, A/C, 
washer/dryer, fenced In back- 
yard, $9B5/morth plus securi- 
ty deposit. (647) 740-2342. 

LEISURE VILLAGE 

CONDO FOR SALE. Call 
for Information. (647) 973- 
0342. 



ROUND LAKE BEACH 3- 
bedroom lownhouse, flre- 
plaoo, i-car garage, rotrlgora- 
lor, stove, dishwasher stay. 
New furnace. $39,500. No as- 
sociation foes. (708) 
629-6551. 

STOP PAYING RENTI 
Have tho prestige of being a 
homeowner. Foxgrove Town- 
homes of Kenosha can help. 
Newly remodeled 3-bedroom, 
1-1/2 bath. Creative financing 
with $2,000 down. $67,000. 
4035 28th Ave., Unl #7. Cal AJ 
at (414) 657-5160. 









1 1 .». 



On 
The Market 



GRAYSLAKE 

Chain CLakes Mobile Homes 

Two homes for sale. 

From tho high $20s, 

to tho bw $50's. 

(847)546-3154 

Or stop at office for 

tfredlons to homes. 

R1. 120 & Fairfield Rd. 

MODULARS 'DOU- 

BLEWIDES *SIN- 

GLEWIDES TWO STORY 
MODULAR ON DISPLAYI 
FOUNDATIONS 'BASE- 

MENTS "GARAGES "WELLS 
•SEPTIC. WE DO IT ALU 
FREE STATEWIDE DELIV- 
ERY/SET. RILEY MANUFAC- 
TURED HOMES 1-800-790- 
1541. 




Joy Myall 
847-870-0101 



Veterans! 



Call I 

Wranw SpecM/s* 
U*ttmrchM Rrtintd 

Century 21 
Landmark 

(708)249-1010 



REDUCED! 

Builders model la upscale Fo* 
Like subdiviskxL. 3+ bdrms, 2- 
1/2 btht. Over 3,100 square feet 
of spscloui living spice includ- 
ing full finished English base- 
ment. Must see to spprecislel 

Call for appointment: 

(847)223-8519 
Weekdays 3:00pm to 8 :00pm 
Weekends: 7r00sm to 8:00pcn 

AtUng $193,500 



VETERANS 



Of JWtJT 

No Mensy Down Fat VA Buyer 

Call: Ntod Danao 

RHtrwtt CttkfPtfty Oftkm 

Pager #312-295-0877 

Century 21 

Landmark 

847-249-1010 



Place Your 
Ad Here! 



Show over 
55,000 readers' 

What's New! 

for as little as 
$15/weetd 

(847) 

223-8161 



1 Bristol, WI ■ 

Torwnhome 

Rental 

Brand new deluxe 2 bed- 
room, 1-1/2 bath. 15 min- 
utes to Great Lakes Navy 
Base. Secluded and very 
private. 

. 414-653-2050 B 



All real estate advertising In this newspaper Is subject to the 
federal Fair Housing Ad which makes It Illegal to advertise any 
preferences, limitation or dlscriminaUoQ based on race, color, 
religion, sot, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an 
Intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrim- 
ination, in the sale, rental or financing of housing. 

4n addition, the Illinois Human Rights Act prohibits discrim- 
ination based on age, ancestry, martial status, or unfavorable 
discharge. Lakeland Publishers will Dot knowingly accept any 
advertising for real estate which violates the law. All persons are 
hereby Informed that all dwellings advertised are available on 
an equal opportunity basis. 

To complain of discrimination, cal the Chicago area Fair 
Housing Alliance toll free at 1-800-659-OPEN 



m 



EsutiHoudng 

OpfXXlntSW 



520 



Apartments For 



Real 



520 



Apartments For Rent 



520 



Apartments For 



Reno 



538 



BusIdcsj Property 
For Rent 



UNION GROVE MANAG- 
ERS Fal Special! 1/2 month 
rent free. Studio, 1 & 2 bed- 
room apartments. Prices 
begin at $395/rnonth. Security 
deposit same as one months 
rent. MW-Mnda, cefllng fans, 
applances and gas heat In- 
cluded, Call today tor an ap- 
pointment! Countryside Apart- 
ments (414) B76-Q7SS. 

WAUCONDA COTTAGE 

UNIQUE 1-bedroom remo- 
deled, on Bangs Lake, wlh 
boat sip, sand beach, dbh- 
washer, microwave, 

$795/month. (047) 487-6161 . 

'tkMrtS^BMt^»»HBBlB^BS*BBBBBBBBBBB*SSS»SSSM^B*lBSSSSSSSSSBH 

GRAYSLAKE LARGE 1- 
BEDROOM, FRESHLY 

painted. Dishwasher, al uni- 
ties Included. $530/month. 
(B47) 223-5350. 

IMPERIAL TOWER A 
IMPERIAL MANOR 
QUIET BUILDINGS 
LARGE SPACIOUS 

APARTMENTS 

AIR CONDITIONING 

PRIVATE BALCONIES 

LARGE CLOSETS 

PRIVACY WALLS 

CONVENIENT LAUNDRY 

FACILITIES. 

CALL (647) 244-9222. 

^ — «lM»B^Bi^BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBa«BBm-^^^™ 

INGLESIDE 1 A 2 BED- 
ROOMS, STUDIO, tree 
heal, gas, water, parking, coin 
laundry. Excellent condition. 
(047) 587-6360. 

INGLESIDE 1-BEDROOM 
APARTMENT heated, with 
garage, stove, refrigerator. 
$550/month, 1 month security 
deposit plus lease, references 
required, no pets. Available 
Immediately. (647) 587^5827, 

INGLESIDE 2 LARGE bed- 
rooms, row carpeting through- 
out, remodeled bath and 
kitchen, utilities Included, 
$750/month plus $750 depos- 
it. (647) 546-7043 for appoint. 
merit. 

LAKE VIEW TERRACE 
APARTMENTS. Large 1+2- 
bedroom apartments. Lake Vil- 
la. $575 and $700/month. 
Heal water, air Included. 
(647)356-5474. 

TWO-BEDROOM DUPLEX 
IN Southwest Zlon, brand new 
with all applances phis wash- 
er/dryer, C/A, attached ga- 
rage. $700/month plus securi- 
ty deposit. (847) 662-8209. 



EASTZION 

TRIPLE A VALUE, 

STUDIO 

$385/month plus electric, f ul 

kitchen, heat paid, coin W/D. 

1-BEDROOM 

$405Mionth plus electric and 

gas, spacious rooms, 

wood floors, loase/aecurtty 

deposit, no pels. 

Section 6 not available 

(847) 831-5388. 



FOX LAKE 1-BEDROOM 

located on N|pperslnk Lake. 
No pots, laundryraom. 
$475/rnonth. (647) 587-7406. 



IMPERIAL TOWER 
& IMPERIAL MANOR 

Quid Buildings 

Luge Spacious Apartments 

Air Conditioning 

Private Balconies 

Large Closets 

Privacy Walls , 

Convenient Laundry Facilities 

CALL 
(847) 244-9222 



1 



DEEPIAKE 
HERMITAGE 

SPACIOUS 1 
BEDROOM SUITES 

• Free gas heal, 
cooking & water 

• Air Conditioner la 
each unit 

• Wsll-lo-wall Carpeting 

• Ample doset space 

• Appliacces Included 

• Tennis & 

Basketball Courts 

• Laundry facilities 
in building 

'545 fg 

149 N. Milwaukee 

Lake Villa, IL 
(847) 356-2002 



APPROXIMATELY 

eoosQ.FT, a/c office 
space, on Rt. 45 In WlWwood. 
Available May 1, 1096. (847) 
223-8691. 
EZXXXZZZZXZXZXXXXXI 

FOR RENT: 

300 sq. foot office unit with 

central A.C, private bath, 

: ample off sued parking, in a 6 ■ 

unit office building In Round 

Lake, reasonable rent. 

(847) 546-0818 
Sxxxzzxxxxxxxxxxxxi 




Water's Edge Apartments 

•FREE Gas heating/cooking & water 
•Spaciously designed 1 & 2 bdrtn apartments 
•Fully equipped picture window kitchen 
•Central air 'Scenic country setting 



250S.Rt.59 

Fox Lake 

(847) 587-6888 




WESTWIND 
VILLAGE 

APARTMENTS 

2200 Lewis Ave., Lion 

1&2 BEDROOMS 

FREE HEAT 

Appliances - Custom Blinds 

On-site Manager. No Pets. 

Starting $495/mo. 

Call Martha & Isaac 

(708) 746-1420 

or Bear Property 

Management 

l4Vft7-9 



■aH a aa aHaaH a a sj 
a Psst«..« a 



(414) 697-9*16 
fit. 



tmmmmtmmmmm 



STATIONSIDE 
VILLAGE 

5215 1TTH AVENUE i 

KENOSHA, W! 

Luxurious Living 
: Apartments & Townhouse 

2 Bedrooms • 2 Baths 

i Mini Blinds 

Appliances 

Garages Available 

Elevators 

No Pets 

Call (414) 656-1010 i 
»i»i»m iii »» i »»nm 



B Want to save money on your H 
grentftt We have a studio 1 &g 
S 2 bedroom apartments that g 
3 are really nice. Located In a. fj 
H great area and after you pay Q 
the rent, you have money CI 
a left!! All this In a 3 year old g 
g building!! Military and g 
S ledion 8 welcome. Short ^ 
g term leases available. Don't a 
a wait, thii Is the best kept 

I rental secret In the area and B 
B the word boultl Call today! » 

g (847)746-2236 g 

■BBBBaaaaBaaaa 

REMINDER... 

THEN£WAREACO0£F0R 

OURAR£AiS(B47) 



r GAGE PARK 
APARTMENTS 
of ANTIOCH 

•Spadous 1 and 2 BR Apt*. 
•Quiet Park-tko Setting 
• Laundry Room In each apt. 
•Garoge Available w/G,D.O. 
•Private Patio/Deck 
S535 to $595 mo. 

: (847) 395-0741 




ANTIOCH 
MANOR 



APARTMENTS 

1&2BIDROOMS 
STARTING AT $500.00 

'Flexible Leasing 
•Laundry Facilities 
'Professional On-SHe Managers 

847-395-0949 

Hwy. 83 & North Ave. 
Located near North Park 



<ii* 



528 


ApL/lloroes 
To Share 


ROOMMATE WANTED to 
share house In Fox Lake. 
5400/month, utilities Included, 
phone seperate. (847) 073- 
0053. 


530 


Rooms For Rent 



538 



Business Property 
For Rent 



ROOM FOR RENT IN 
SPRING GROVE. Chain 
O'Lakes fun. Share a new 
home, private phone, cable, 
laundry. Non-smoker. 

$385/month. (708) 665-4484. 




SPORTS BAR 
& GRILL 

in Stevens Point, W L Active busi- 
ness, nr UW Campus. 10,0006/, 
leases lOOOft to pizza delivery 

business. Todd 11-6 M-F 

715-341-1199 



COMMERCIAL BUILD- 

INGS FOR RENT, Rl. 12 & 
RT. 50 exposure. Office plus 5 
commercial bays, overhead 
doors, dock, ramp. Avaaabfe 
Immediately (will split space). 
(647) 587-7008. 

GRAYSLAKE PRIME 
DOWNTOWN store Iron! and 
or office, 2300sq.tt. Will divide. 
(647) 223-5353. 

LEASE 6.000SQ.FT. 
BEAUTIFUL otllce and ware- 
house. Unbelievable monthly 
rent. Plenty of parking space 
available. Secured building. 
West of downtown Waukegan. . 
(847) 662-8550. 

OFFtCE FOR RENT 

l.iOOsq.n., now occupied by 
Insurance company, located 
al Grand Plaza In Undenhurst. 
Available May 1st. (847) 
658-0898. 



UBERTWILLE 

3,000 s.f. 

Peterson Rd. 

frontage 

Stores or offices 

finished to suit 

Available Now 

Regional 

(847)818-8300 



560 



Vacant Lot/Acreage 



BY OWNER LOT FOR 
SALE, adfotntng golf course In 
Round Lake Beach. Cal after 
6pm. (708) 788-1808. 



564 



ResorWacuioo 
Rentals 



GOT A CAMPGROUND 
MEMBERSHIP OR TIME- 
SNARE? Wet lake II Ameri- 
ca* largest resale clearing- 
house. Call Resort Sales InL 1- 
800-423-5967 (24 hours). 



568 



Oul Of Area Propat) 



INDIANA 

Very low crime, low traffic 
area. New 4br home on 7 acre 
with woods & pond, 6 miles to 
Lake Michigan, near Heston, 
IN.$257K.ByOwner. 

219-778-2422 



Check This 

Section 
Every Week! 



568 



LOfArcaPropcrt) 



COLORADO 2 ACRES on 
Trout FtsHng Stream, Great 
Mountain views. Very private, 
accessible, good roads. Ad- 
|oums government lands. 
S 13, 500! $500 down. Owner 
France. 710/B52-O611. 

COLORADO RANCH 97 
acres - $44,900. Lush fields, 
views o( stales largest resev- 
oJr & Rocky Mountains. Out- 
standing recreallon/wlldtfe. 
Telephone, electric, year 
round access. Financing. Call 
anytime. 719-485-0656. Red 
Creek. 

DOOR COUNTY 2-BED- 
ROOM ranch, stone fire- 
place. 2-car attached garage, 
1.7 wooded acres, all applianc- 
es, large shed, new roof, wel 
maintained, $110,000. (847) 
244-2085. 

HARDY/EVENING SHADE. 
ARKANSAS area. Assume 
payments $99.91 on 5.2 
Ozark Mountain Wooded 
Acres wRh Spring River Ac- 
cess. Exceient Hunting/Fish- 
ing. Beach Club Realty 1-800- 
809-1415. 

LAKEFRONT 8 AC 

$37,800. Over 116' Lakofront 
In secluded country setting on 
large recreational lake In TN. 
Gorgeous lake & mtn views. 
Heavily wooded, subdrvldabie. 
Excellent on site financing. 
Call today 800-239-8323, exL 
1199. 

NEAR KNOXVILLE, TN 
LAKEFRONT BARGAINSI 
Free brochure and land test. 
Beautifully wooded with In- 
credible lake & mtn. views. 
Low taxes. Exc. terms. View 
lots from $7,900. Lakefronta 
from $34,900. Call 800-376- 
0602, ext. 1120. Fke #07249- 
jtL 

NORTHERN Wl: BOULD- 
ER JCT...2.7 ac. W/339* Of 
southern exposed frig. Only 
$42,950. EAGLE RIVER...Iar- 
gest chain for $39,9501 1.9+ 
ac. W/100+ ft. Frig. M1NOC- 
QUA AREA,. .5-1 1 acres heavi- 
ly wooded parcels w/access to 
10 lake chalnl Cal for details. 
PARK FALLS...Over 4 ac. 
W/150' ol frig. On bfg water, 
$17,950. Ask about our free 
Inventory sheet. Call today. 1- 
800-548-8933 FOUR SEA- 
SONS REALTY. 

OWN YOUR OWN HOME 
NOW I No downpayrneni on 
Miles materials. Innovative 
construction financing. Call 
Miles Home today, 1-600-343- 
2884. ext. L . 



MICHIGAN 

So. of Kalamazoo. Howard 
Lake all sports w/160' frontage, 
3940sf walkout Ranch (4br), 2- 
1/2 hrs. from Chicago, $480K 
Exclusive call Lonnle, RE/MAX 
of Kalamazoo, 616-382-8049 
for details. 



ILLINOIS, WATSBKA 

15 room rural community 
estate, built In 1909 w/reconl 
Improvements. Oak wdwrk. 
English wool crpL Can be 
business or residential. 5 car 
gar., pool, bsmt & walk-In 
attic, elevator. $225K. By 
Owner. Call 815-432-8483. 



INDIANA, SCHERERVILLE 

Country Irving. Maintain 4000tf 
home on 3+ heavily wooded 
aca., 4 tile bths, sauna, 2 
frpics, heated Irg shop. Close 
to malls & good schts, $275K. 
Offered by owner. 

219-365-4604 



OREGON RANCH - 
No. Central 

Great Corp/lndtv. Retreat Mies 
of prtv. world class fishing & 
hunting, $800K with cows. Call 
John Hildortxand, 541-442- 
5467 or J. Freedman & Co. 
541-389-4050 for Info/dotals. 



UTAH, NEPHI 

2 story mansion home, 16 
rms, 5-1/2 ba, Irg basement, 
elegantly fenced, older 1/2 
restored, back 1/2 modem. 
Low-mid $300's. By. owner. 
801-623-1615 or Fax: 801 
623-2801. Principles onfy. 



WISC -For Sale 
By Owner 

Beaut yr-md remod home on 
Little Elkhart Lake. 3BR/2J8A, 
2c-gic 1/2 mL to Road America 
Racttrk $269,900 or Und contnet 

414-467-3382 



UTAH 

OWN A PffiCfi OF ARTl 

Only Frank Lloyd Wright in 
Utah totally restored on 6.2 
acres. S780K. Call Louise: 1 
800-349-5539 or 801-292- 
0137, Lane Realty. 



570 


"Cemetaylotj 



DOUBLE CRYPT AT 

Memorial Gardens Cemetery 
m Artngton Heights, at Veter- 
ans Garden of Honor. Market 
value $3,995. wtl aef $2£95. 
Must be a vet or famly of vet 

(847)529-4450. 



704 



Becmlaol 

Vehicles 



QMC MOTORHOME 

1976, sloops 4, new shocks, 
new urea, S5.4O0A>est. (414) 
862-2215. 

MOT OR HO ME -1874 BAN- 
NER, SLEEPS 8, has every- 
thing, new air condUonlng 
unit. Call lor details (414) 
657-8163 after 3pm. 

PICK-UP CAMPER 10- 
1/2FT., $850. (647) 

244-0835. '■ 

TRAILER 1972 13FT. serf- 
contained Scotty. Very good 
condition, $l,500/negoUable. 
Call Don (414) 852-0356. 



708 



Srxfirmobiles/ATTl 



1987 SUZUKI QUAD 
RACER 250R, never raced, 
$1,500. (847) 587-8036 after 
4pm. 

FOUR WHEELER 1993 Po- 
laris Tral Boss. Low hours, 
Ike new. Used only (or Ice fish- 
ing. $2,00Obeat. (647) 740- 
7380 after 5pm. Ask for Mm. 



710 



Bo&t/Mok>n/Elc. 



1984 27ft. SEA SPRITE 
AFT. Cabin, electric head wtth 
shower and sink. Stove, 
range, shore PWR cord, trim 
tabs, trailer. Retal $18,000, 
sacrifice $12,000. (414) 279- 
9912. 

1993 A 1994 VXR AND PRO- 
VXR WAVERUNNERS. 
$e,995mest. Will seperate. 
(847) 356-2747. 

1995 JAVLIN 320 A 19* 

deep V bass boat, Johnson 
150 Fast strike. 20hre. total, 
loaded. Retail $34,000, 
$17,500. Untitled and full war- 
ranty. (847) 244-0533 even- 
Ings, (647) 367-2338 days. 

SAIL BOAT-2SFT. DUTCH 
Built, well maintained and 
equipped, $5,600. (414) 
942-4078. 




1 CLASSIFIED UkcUNd Newspapers ApniU9, 1996 



710 



Boit/Molors/Etc 



SYLVAN 
PONTOON BOATS 

30 NEW IN STOCK 
IN DOOR SHOWROOM 

HUSTLER SPORT 
CENTER, INC. 

(815) 385-4848 



HEWITT BOAT DOCKS 

ROLL-IN A FRKK STANDI NCI 

HEWITT BOAT SLIPS 

too to nooo ut. 

IN DOOR SHOW ROOM 

HUSTLER SPORT 

CENTER, INC. 

(R15)385-4M8 




Baby On We Way ... 
So My Wife Says 

1 Haw To Trade bi Mr 
Boat For A Mini Van 
(OrMfNmcbMud) 

BASS/SKI BOAT 

Baylfncr 125 Force with 

55 Prop, new trailer, 

25 lb. electric motor 

(25 lb. thrust), depth 

meter, marine radio, 

AM/FM cassette, cover, 

2 live wells. 245/hrs. 

35800/orbest 
815-363-1115 




Woodland Pier I 

Pre-Season 
Boat Show 

April 25th-28th 

Lake Geneva Wal-Mart 

(RM2&50) 

EVERY BOAT, MRY 
MOTOR OH SAW 

Find that special Jon, 
Bass, Pontoon or Tiller 
boat and be ready for the 
seasonl Check out our In 
store promotions. Stop by 
for our special radio 
remote on the 27th. 

Woodland Pier I 

1-800-846-7128 



SLIPS AVAILABLE ON 
FOX LAKE, with 4-way safe- 
ty linos, 19ft. and down. (847) 
356-2747. 

TWO PERSONAL WATER- 
CRAFTS AVAILABLE. 1994 
models, Arctic Cat Tiger 
Shark, Daytona's, seats 2. 
Top spoed 55pmh, 550cc en- 
gine. Less than 50hra. each. 
Double trailer with sport box 
for storage and canvas. P. W.C, 
covers. Asking 39,500. Call 
AJmoo or Jotf (647) 247-0465 
anytime. 




Doat/Molors/Elc. 



SHI BOATS! 

We have 2 great 
entry ipedah 

•1986 19' American Skies. 
New Interior] 

• 1991 24' Master w/454 
Chevy. Musi Seel 

Super Clean!! 
Great River Boor! 

• 198718'Madi1vw200HP 
Maauiscr. Fbt-Out-Funlll 

• 1991 19* Star Daft Rshit Fun 
W4Jb(Merauiser 

Excellent Buy!!! 

• 1991 20' Straios Hot Foot 
w2O0 Evinrude. New Inferior! 
Must Seel Runs Greati 1 1 

• 1991 19' Glassport Cuddy 
w/3. Lx Mercruiser 

Jet Booh! 

Get Ready How! 

For Summer Fob!!! 

MtedtoBey 

• 1989 AdvanL Avenger 
w/454 Berkley 19' 

• 1977 Cobra w/454 
Berkley 19' 

fefflm 
1-800-SUE-BOAf 



714 



Camping 



CAMPER 10FT. LANCER, 
sloops 6 people, nice shape, 
many oxtra'a, must see. Ask- 
kig $1,100. (414) 537-4250. 



720 



Sports Equipment 



GOLF CLUBS, LEFT and 

right handod, metal woods, 
golf bags and carls, cue sticks 
and cases. (047) 567-0531. 

NORDIC TRACK "WALK 
FIT* TREADMILL, $500. NEWI 
(B47) 395-5490. 

OLYMPIC SIZE PUNCH- 
ING BAG, $40/flrm. (706) 625- 
9776 alter 5pm. 

RALEIGH TECHNUM 12- 

SPEED bicycle, 27ln. 

$100/llrm. (708) 625-9776 
aflor 5pm. 

WILSON JUNIOR GOLF 
CLUBS and bag. Like new. 
$50/Tlrm. (647) 655-0235. 



REMINDER... 

THE NEW 

AREA CODE FOR 

OUR AREA IS 

<S4T) 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

If you hove placed classified 
advertising with the Lake- 
land Newspapers you may 
receive a misleading state- 
ment from another firm re- 
questing payment for this 
advertising. To receive prop- 
er credit to your account, 
all payments for your Lake- 
land Newspapers . advertising 
must be made as Invoiced 
and directed to: 

Lakeland Newapapen 

PO Box 368 

30 8. Whitney St. 

Ormyalafcc. P. 00080-0368 





FOR 
YOU 

Lakeland 



Classifieds Have Something 
For Everyone! 



The Apartment Dweller. 

The Home Seller... 

The Car Buyer... 

The Butler For Hire... 

The Do-lt-Yourselfer... 

The Mother's Helper... 

The Job Seeker... 
The Bargain Reaper... 

When you want results, 
\\ turn to the Lakeland Classifieds. 

3 Lakeland Newspapers 



"in 



.i__ 



£■ *2 



_•■ 



i ■ M 



a 



Have You Discovered The Internet 

As Your Newest Business Tool? 



:.-.:; 



m* 



"&?% 






?m 



'■>■■<:■■.'':■ 



g&SS&tis 



»tsl 



For More Information, Call: 
(847) 223-8199 

E-Mail: seirvice@liid.com 

Visit us on the Internet: 

http://www.lnd.com 



The latest stock information. Updates on inventory. 

E-mail to a supplier in Burma. There are a thousand 

ways to use the Internet as a unique force in the 

manner in which you conduct business today. Are 

you connected? Call a Lakeland netDIRECT 

representative today, and ask about business 

benefits. We also offer a web page service to help 

you gain your presence worldwide on the 

Internet. This could just be your greatest investment. 

With Lakeland netDIRECT, you'll get. 

• Local Phone Call For Over 30 Prefixes 

• Unlimited Use • Chat Groups 

• News Groups • E-Mail • Flat Fee of $25 

• World Wide Web Access • Web Pages 

• Supports Up to 33.6 Modems 

• Discount Rates Available • Much More!!! 



netDlR 



'Lakeland netDIRECT offers local phone charges to most of the Lake County area. Call for information about your prefix. 



§ 



I "LP- 



^^ : *^v»>jz*m^j i 



r*~*t<~- ww'H •«■%■"•*«"•** *•*»*■•.• vm -m 



»*v\rf ****■■'' » r r «'« 



-A.0 i vI'U'/, 1 • ■ ■ ii'ii'i-v y i ill ' v 



i f\ A A A £ £. A C 4v & & 



BBMBai 



April 19, 1996 UkelANd Newspapers CLASSIFIED 






724 



Airplanes 



HILTON HEAD 
ISLAND FBO 

Brand new facility. 
Branded Air B.R 

CAROLINA AIR 
CENTER, INC 

803-689-3200 



804 



Can for Sale 



!■■■•■■■■■«■■ ■■■»•■•■■ I 

|The Lakeland; 

Classified 

Section 

Gets Results! 



804 



Can for Sale 



I860 CALIFORNIA T- 
3IRD. Mechanlca restored. 
loady (or palnl and chromo. 
5 (847) 336-8807 aflof Spm. 

1981 MARK VI, navy blue, 
jood runner, no rust, 
(950*ost. (047) 546-3814 
tor 4 pm. 

MERCURY HATCH- 
JACK, good runner, new 
I, body nooda work, $000. 
546-8302. 

>ONTIAC FIREBIRD 

11984, 4-CYUNDER, 

(GOOD CONDITION, $900. 
|( 647> 623-6704. 

1986 MERCEDES BENZ 

300D TURBO 

Super dean, showroom 

conation. Garage kept. Slver 

wBh Mack Interior. A/C, power 

sunroof, power everything. 

$9,900/best. 

{847)587-4119. 



1991 HONDA ACCORD 
LX, 4-door, 1-ownor, 49,000 
ml tea, tuly loaded. Exoolert 
condllon In/out. Just tunod. 
$8.905.(847)945-5217. 

MERCURY TRACER 
1991, 4-door, automatic, 
A/C, cassette, 78,000 mltos, 
oxoolfenl condlllon. Asking 
$3,995. Call for Tom days 
(847) 249-2330, ovontngs 
(8471 223-5041. 

AUDI 1034, AM/FM cas- 
sette, A/C, power steer- 
(ng/brakos, 2-way sunrool, 
now Ignition, mutllor, tires, 
runs groat, $2,30QA>O3t. (847) 
247-1878. 

OUICK REGAL 1991, 4- 
door, automatic, a)r, cassotto, 
cruise, power everything. 
$6,695. (847) 223-9462. 

CHEVY CAVALIER 1988, 
55,000 miles, automatic, cas- 
sotto, $3,800/bost. (647) 
546-0233. 



804 


Can for Sale 



814 



Senfce&Parto 



EEfST 



m 



Four Vbcd Drive 



834 



TrudorTnllen 



844 



Motorcydes 



HONDA ACCORD EX 1995, 
automatic, sunroof, loaded, 
7,000 miles, blade 
$18/trJObOSt. (706) 296-7432. 

LINCOLN 1908 MARK VII, 
all the toys, runs great, 
$5,900/bost. (414) 657-8183 

alter 3pm. 

NISSAN 300 ZX 1990, twin 
turbo, black/black leather, 5- 
spood, all options, mint condi- 
tion, 89K miles. $13,000. Larry 
(847) 872-4512. 

OLDS CUTLASS SU- 
PREME 1991, 6-cyltndor, 
white, 2-door, clean, very 
good condition. $7,300. (847) 
467-0744. 

PONTIAC 6000 1887, 4- 
door, one owner, wol main- 
tained, power steering, power 
brakos, power windows, air, 
roardetoggor. (647) 740-2035. 



CHEVY, FORD PICK-UP 
bodies. Factory new, guar- 
anteed from 51,300. Doors 
from $89.00, fenders from 
$50.00, beds from $800, bod- 
liners $169.00. BUMPERS, 
GRILLS, REPAIR PANELS, 
PAINTS, ABRASIVES, WIND- 
SHIELDS, RADIATORS. Delv- 
ory. Mark's 217-824-8184. 



824 


Yam 



810 



dassic/AoUqueCan 



FORD GRANADA 1981, 
$400. (647) 873-0502. 

FORD PROBE QT 1993 
blac, 5-speed, AM/FM cas- 
sette, power sunroof, 43K, ex- 
cellent condition, 
$ii,500/bo3i. or take over 
payments. (847) 837-1047. 

HONDA ACCORD LX 
1988, 4-door. AT w/consolo, 
power steering, power wind- 
ows, A/C, power brakes, 
AM/FM cassette. Newer 
brakes, Aquatreda, . exhaust 
and tune-up. 84K easy com- 
muter miles. Excellent Interior 
and exterior. Totaly depend- 
able and exceptionally clean. 
$6,950. Call (647) 548-1 1 15. 



1957 FORD RANCHERO, 
sold body, H.IP.O. 302, au- 
tomatic, T-Blrd. Interior, runs 
good, mag wheels, AM/FM 
stereo, new tires, engine de- 
tailed, needs finishing, 
$5,900/best. (647) 223-7099 
WBdwood. 



■t— i. 



814 



Service & Parts 



CHEVY ASTRO 1991 EXT. 

all wheel drive powor 
locks/windows, 77,000 miles, 
great condition, $8,350. (847) 
546-9639. 

CHEVY CUSTOM WIND- 
OW VAN, good condllon, 65K 
on engine, 12K on transmis- 
sion, now tiros and many new 
parts, mechanic owned, 
$2,000Aest. (847) 249-1821. 

DODGE 1880 CONVER- 
SION VAN, runs good, looks 
decent, $900/best. (414) 
652-3775. 

DODGE 1994 DAKOTA 
Club Cab, SLT, V6 magnum 
engine, Century cap, very 
clean, 36.000 mflos, air, power 
windows, AM/FM cassotto, 2' 
receiver hitch. (414) 
889-6454 evenings. 



1994 S-10 4-DOOR, red 
and grey Blazer, all power, 4- 
wd, leather Interior, 48,000 
mllea, $16,700. (708) 
949-3948. 

FORD BRONCO XLT 1989, 
everything oledrlc, power and 
A/C, remote control, CD play- 
er, 4-wbool drive, tilt wheel, 
cruise control. $8,995. (815) 
344-9522. 

ISUZU 1989 IMPULSE 
TURBO, automatic, loaded, 
handling by Lotus, sports car 
fun, Japanese reDabllyl Nicer 
than Collca GT or 240-SX. 
Service records. $4,800. (414) 
551-7072. 



4X4 JEEP 



Raised lift, fiberglass 

body, stainless steel 

dash. All new interior. 6 

point roll bar. Chrome 

headers & exhaust 

Specialized rims. 

• 5 ,100 or beat offw 

847-740-7380 

After 5:00 p.m. 
or weekends 
Ask for Kim 



1966 GMC 1/2-TON 

PICKUP TRUCK 

Shortbod, step-side, 

big 8-cyflnder wflh 4-spood. 

Radial tires, CB, AM/FM 

cassotto. Camper fop. 

Runs oxcolent. Some rust. 

Asking $2,300. 

After 6pm 

Call (847) 7404976. 

1986 FORD DUALLY, 460 

engine, $10,000. (847) 
949-1651. 

CHEVY PICKUP SIDE- 
STEP 350, 1978, black, 3/4 
ton, short bed, automatic, 
110,000 miles. $1,000/bost. 
CHEVY PICKUP DIESEL 
FULL SIZE 1981, 1 ton, au- 
tomatic, 91,000 miles, 
$1,500/bo3t. JEEP COM- 
MANDO with plow, 
$1 ,000/best. INTERNA- 
TIONAL SCOUT with plow, 
$1,O00*est. For more Wor- 
matlon call (70S) 710-3995 
leave message or call Sue at 
(708) 20S-8S54 8arrHtpm. 

DODGE RAM PICK-UP 
TRUCK 1983, very dean, IK- 
lie rust, excellent condition. 
Runs great, Includes 
cap,$1 ,500. -(847) 5B7-7478. 

FORD 1888 RANGER 
SUPER CAB, 5-speed, 
$3,200/best. (414) 942-7015 

evenings. 



1985 KAWASAKI VULCAN 
700. ExcoDont condlllon. Ask- 
ing $2,000. Call Matt (847) 
625-8144. 

1985 KAWASAKI VUL- 
CAN, $1,950*ost. (847) 
336-1935 ask for John. 

Check TKis 

Section 
Ev^ry Week! 

DUAL SPORT 1887 Yama- 
ha XT 350. Geared for off 
road, full engine rebutted, 
after market muffler, MOTO-X 
tiros; and many other extras. 
Must ride to appreciate. 
$1,40XVbest. Can Peto (647) 
223-6088 evenings, (847) 
623-4400 days. ; 

HONDA GOLDWING 

1975. Very good shape, 
$1,000/Tlrm. (414) 643-2635 

after 5pm, before 9pm. ■ 

MOTORCYCLES: MOTOR- 
CYCLES WANTED Cash wBI 
be paid for your street legal 
morotcycle. For Immedtate 
Pick up, Please call Scott 
Young To Discuss Your Bice 1- 
800-679-3221. 



848 



Wauled To Buy 



REBUILT ENGINES 302 re- 
built, 305 rebuilt Chovrolet 
transmission, used avallabto, 
reseated with 90 day warranty 
ktstaled, complete brake work 
and automotive repair. (847) 
872-7150 Mike's Automotive 
& Radiator Repair In 7Jon. 



828 



Four Wheel 

Drive/) eeps 



834 


Trucks/Trailers 



838 


Heavy Equipment 



FORD BRONCO 1987, 
EDDIE BAUER PACKAGE, 
ATR, 4X4, AC. $4,300. (815) 
566-7488. 



DODGE RAM MINI 4x4, 
1988, 5-speed. Very dean 
truck Inside and outside. 
$3,800*08*. (414) 537-4386. 



1984 LT 9000 Tandem Axle 
Dump, 350 Cummins, 13- 
speed transmission, equipped 
with 10ft. Western hydrotum 
plow. Asking $23,000/best. 
(414) 652-6477. 



LOOKING FOR SUZUKI 
VS700-600 Intruder. 1986- 
1990, good condition. (647) 
362-3251. 

VAN OR CAR WANTED for 
family. Treadmll and fax ma- 
chine, reasonable offers. 
(847) 736-0317. 



Lakeland Newspapers Is Your 



-T 



TO PLACE 

YOUR AD HERE 

GALL 

708-223-8161 



-To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 



RECYCLE! 

Cash For 

•Aluminum Cans' 

•Ml Other Scrap Metals 

Industrial Accounts Welcome 

Chicago Surplus 

1t304 260th Avenue 
Trevor, Wl 



Pric* Subject To Chang* 

LOCATION: Tievor. Wl |5 minutes 
Noah ol Antioch) TaKe Hwy C one 
mile west ol Route B3 Turn North on 
2591H Si Veer lo left lor 2 blocks (neil 
to Foxy's Tavern) 

Mon. • Fri. 8:30 am - S pm 

Saturday 8:30 am • 3:30 pm 

(414) 862-2517 

(414) 862-2554 






Strength and Versatility 
Identify a HEWITT 

Dock or lift 



Itfrlt-A-fffrdfr™ 

Features "bridge -type" construction 
snd extra bracing at all stress points 
for trouble-free service year after year. 

Boat and Pontoon 



JJifets 




The Lift line is available in steel or aluminum and offers a 
range of sizes to handle craft from 600 to 8,000 pounds. 
Available with canopies. 



Minutictured by 

MANUFACTURING, INC. 
Box 111 Nicollet. MN 56074 
(507) 225-3421 



AREA DEALER 

HUSTLER SPORT CENTER 

(815) 385-4848 

DEALERS INQUIRIES WELCOME 



^ Put your ^ 

ad here! 
It gets results! 

Direct line 

223-8161 



AAAAAAAAAAAA A A 

i I CW LANDSCAPE CO. INC J J 

A LWJDSCAPC DESIGNERS 1 CONTRACTORS A 

A Serving Uki County Since 1960 A 

* 'Computer Design -Seeding *- 

. 'Flagstone Patios -Sodding 

^ 'Stone WaJIs -Ranting ^ 

A 'Texture Gardens -Grading a 

A t7t\Q\ 7AR.ftQM A 



AAAAAAAAAAAA A/A. 



Interior/Exterior 

New construction or we can 
make it look like new! 

Expert Wallpaper Removal and Wall Repair 
Ready to be Painted or Papered 




Painting 



Call us about Spring Deck Specials 



847-546-2860 
847-395-0490 



Reasonable Rates 
Never A Charge For Estimate* 



RESID 




•••LOW RATES*** 
IIEANEY'S INSIDE 

■IV STORAGE 
SUMMER SPECIAL 

Any Size Boat Trailer 
$25,00 per month 

or 

2 Snows on Trailer 

■Im 
Cars-Pop Ups-Boats 

PWC Motor Homes, Trailers otc. 
Store anything on wheels. 

f847) 587-9100 



$&D\ 



jSawn Seruice 

Complete Weekly Maintenance 

Mowing, Edging, Trimming 

Thatching, Rake or Hedge Trim. 

Estimates Free 

JOHN (847) 731-1328 





^fe 


Margaritas 
Sluttiias 


rtfi 


and Moral 


JOK 


Frozii Biwijl 

Mutual Rultl 


mm 


• Pirtlii 
•BlrfUlfl 
kh • firiJutliit 
P - WiUli|i 


^^S 


847-487-6887 



GINO'S 
DECORATING 

Painting & Staining 

Call New 

Free Estimates 

Affordable Rates 

Fully insured 
Quality Work with 
Written Guarantee 

(847) 526-2107 



AAAAAAAAAAAA 

* J & I liadwophg, he A 

* Design and Plantings * 

* Seed & Sod A. 

* Wall Systems ^ 

* Boulder & Timber Walls * 

* Drainage Systems * 

4 for eft., col . 
A (847)526-7017 a 

AAAAAAAAAAAA 



RESIDENTIAL 

ROOFING 
CONTRACTOR 

COMPLETE ROOFING SERVICE 

SVARAS ROOFING 

Island Lake, IL 

526-2304 

'take advantage of our 

reduced winter pricing, 8JQ 
same warranty, same quality 




ILaursen & 
TMlackman%. 

Window & Door Replacement 
^h/vv^^ Service You Can Trust 

You San ^^ Free Estimates 

mi».*m (7Q8) 838-5300 



* Dependable 8 
Swimming 
Pool 8i Spa 

Above-Ground Pools, Spas, 

Chemical*, Equipment & Accessories {; 
Complete Maintenance & Service 

Visit Our Showroom Anytime!! 

124 S. Route 83 

Grayslake,IL 

223-1606 

•z uuazuzum P 




CLASSIFIED LaIceUncI Newspapers ApnlL 19, 1996 




-To These Fine Lakeland Area Business & Services 




AS SEEN ON TV 

MX AMERICAN 
ROOFING INC. 



(847) 438-4131 

Residential & 

Commercial 

Shingles, Siding, 

Windows, Flat Roofs, 

Sheet Metal 

SINCE 1975 

FREE DETAILED ESTIMATES 






Self-Employed? 

endorsed 
Health Insurance* 

At Aflbnliihlo Rules 

Call Charlie 
847-359^8857 

*( iiilorw rillcti bvlM'L Life Ins. Cit. 



r 



Easy PC 

Computer System 

Installation 

Maintenance 

Small Business 
Automation 

(847) 526-0454 



ALUMINUM B 
VINYL SIDING 

■ Soffit &>Fascia 
Window Trim - References 

Vinyl Replacement Windows 
Woik Guaranteed 
Insured - Free Estimates 
1 .27 yrs. Experience 

4 EAGLE SIDING CO. 
847) 526-7222 



PLUMBING SPECIAL 

• APRIL SAVINGS • 

20% Discount 

on Kitchen & Bath Plumbing 

Fairfield Building 

Services 

(847)548-7877 

(847) 686-7877 

Heating, Cooling & Plumbing 





• ROYAL GARDEN* • 
LANDSCAPING 

•Landscape Architects 8t Con me tors 
•Dcsign/insullailon 
•Complete Weekly Maintenance 
•Sod, Seed, Power ratting, Aerating 
•Shade trees - 2 yr. guarantee 
•Fully Insured 

$25 OFF 

WITH THIS AD 

Call the Professionals Today 

847-740-3875 





CONSTRUCTION • GENERAL CARPENTRY 

•Custom Decks 

•Porches •Room Additions 'Basement Remodeling 
•Bathrooms - Kitchens *C ustom Carpentry 'Improvements & Repairsl 

INSURED & BONDED 
FREE ESTIMATES 

(414) 889-8442 

' PleaseCaU'Gary Kolkau - 




v. 



4* 



*tS 0> From $29 ***€» 

HO ATTORNEYS* FAST, SIMPLE, NO WAITING * 

BUSINESS PLANS - RESUMES AND MORE 
CALL FOR ADDITIONAL SERVICES OFFERED 

WE THE PEOPLE BUSINESS CENTER 

(847) 548-1300 



BAD CREDIT? 
FIX IT LEGALLY! 

WE HAVE SUCCESSFULLY REMOVED 
•LATE PAYMENTS 'BANKRUPTCIES 
•JUDGEMENTS 'WRITE OFFS AND 
MUCH MORE FROM OUR CLIENTS 

CREDIT REPORTS 
"LEGALLY AND AFFORDABLY" 

G.A. WATSON 
ATTORNEY AT LAW 

(708) 368-7242 

FREE 24-HOUR RECORDED MESSAGE 



£ DECK SAVERS +£ 

a Pressure Washing ,+ 
Restoration - Staining J 

A •Decks •Siding & 

~ •Fences •Docks 

Pressure Treated Wood is 
$• NotWeatherproofl ^ 

+ INSURED + 

fr (847) 395-8428 f* 



PARTNERS 

V CLEANING 
SERVICE 



srui\<; SAVixtis 

savi.:i!|'t<)#50.00 

ONIIOMKCI.KANINt; 




WALMARV-) 
FENCE CO. 

Deal Direct With Owner 

AU TYPES OF FENCING 

Chain Link •Wood 

Ornamental 'Etc 

We Also Do Decks!) 

CALL 

(847)362-1111 



Residential 
•Commercial 
•Movc-In/Movc-Out 
|J^e_Es£rnatcs _ ^47-746-7972 j 

™-"o!i™& saveT-™ 

C & R SONS TRUCKING 

Driveway Repairs, 

Gravel & Dirt Hauled, 

Room Addition Excavating 

BOBCAT WORK 

PROMPT SERVICE 

Phone: (847)587-8304 

Pager: (847)536-3859 




Joy-Us Wedding 
Accessories 

Bride's Satin Card Purse, 
Bridal Bouquet, 

Veil, Carter 

Flowergirl Basket, 

Ring Pillmv 

(847)587-0199 



STUMP 
REMOVAL 



•?tompl 
flemcrals 



•Free 
^t\pf£ Esfimafes 




847-838-1313 

ABITIOOH, Hi 



t- 




CONTRACTORS ELECTRIC SERV1CEJNC. 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR^ 
"Call Us For Fast Courteous Service" 

33265 N. Re. 45 
» Wildwood, ILL 60030 

(708) 223-4682 
RESIDENTIAL - COMMERCIAL 





-/% 



I' 

I A 



M 




A Complete Building & 
Remodeling Service 

•k Custom Homes 

* Additions, 2nd Floors, 
Garages 

* Sunrooms 
-k Decks 

* Window Replacement and 

Add-Ons 

* New Siding and Exterior Trim 

* Basements Finished 

* Kitchen Renovation 

* Reroofs 

* Skylights 

Call Ron 

For A Free Estimate and References 
(815)675-6204 
v Quality Work At A Fair Price. 



COMPLETE 
DECORATING SERVICE 

f Call Does It All I ft 

Exterior/Interior Painting 

and Wall Papering 

Remodeling ,. 

'Bathrooms 'Basements 

•Kitchens *Rec Rooms 

Deck" Construction/Maintenance - 

All Home Repairs with licensed 

: . ''•■;■• ElectrlclarVPIumber 

"•i**, f«o f f f/flufei, sonlor Dlseounti 

(847)604-1629 






Graphic Art & Design 

265-0986 

We come to you! 
Find the perfect style without ever leaving your noma 




CLINT DAVIS 

Builder-Remodeler 

since mo 

-Room Additions 

-Kitchens & Baths 

-Window Replacement 

-New Homes & Design Service 

Call 847-872-4366 

Fully Insured 




Maple Leaf 
Tree Service 

Commercial/Residential 

•TYee Trimming •Tree Removal 
♦Lot Clearing 'Seasoned Firewood 
•Stump Removal 

Al Horton 

(847) 726-8653 



DONT THROW AWAY 
THAT OLD LAMP, 
BRING IT TO OUR 
LAMP DOCTORS, 
FOR REPAIRS. 

ft a 

WARREN ELECTRIC INC. 

33261 N. Highway 45 

Wildwood, IL 60030 

(847) 223-8691 




Pet Clean-Up Service 

$14 per month bi-weekly 
$24 per month weekij 

Call for more 

information 

<847> 
548-4633 



giimiiiuiiiimiiiiiiiimiiii minimi jjjijS 

George's 
Decorating | 

Paint & Wallpaper | 
Interior & Exterior 
General Repairs 
Quality Work 
PAINT & WALLPAPER | 
SPECIAL | 

| Free Estimates •Written Guarantee § 
1 30% OFF with this ad I 
(847) 548-5110 

iiiiiiiiiiiliifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniMiiiiiHiiiir; 




■niniimui 




Licensed 

Insured 

FREE 

Estimates 



ROOFING 

SIDING & TRIM 

SEAMLESS GUTTERS 

WINDOWS •DOORS 

fgJECKS- AWNINGS 

Repair & Insurance Work 

(847)438-6634 



Quality 

Craftsmanship 

Guaranteed 



JACK'S 
REMODELING 

BASEMENTS 

Dormers • Siding • Soffit 
Windows • Decks • Bathrooms 

FREE ESTIMATES 

plus references 

CALL JACK AT 
(847) 546-3759 



3 II 



SB 



l 



BUYING 

Aluminum Cans 

*COPPER 'BRASS 
*AUTO RADIATORS 

*LEAD 'ALUMINUM 

A-1 RECYCLING 

96 Honing Rd., Fox Lake, IL 

(708) 587-0788 

•or- 

1000 Rand Rd(Rt. 12), Unit 212' 
Wauconda, IL 

(708) 526-0760 

HOURS: 

Mon.-Frl. 

9 a.m. -5 p.m. 

Sat. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. 



Closed 12-12:30 





' "'/- :-!»", .' r 



Apuil 19, 1 996 UkEJANd Newspapers LIPSERVICElp3 



i ■ 






■ * 



LIPSERVICE 

It's tI-ie T/vLk oF t^e town 

Get h off your chEsx (847) 225-8075 




^liiiiF 



Lakeland 

Newspapers 



■w%i 



Lipservice is a phone-in column presented as a feature of 
Lakeland Newspapers. Lakeland Newspapers makes no claim to 
the authenticity of the statements. Lakeland Newspapers does not 
claim the content or the subject matter as fact, but as the personal 
opinion of the caller. Lakeland Newspapers reserves the right to 
edit copy or to refrain from printing a message. Call in at 223-8073 
and leave your message 24-hours a day. Although the call is 
anonymous, please leave your village name. 



Leave us alone 

Thank you, voters of Lake Zurich, 
for voting out Bulldozer Bob and 
his band of gypsies off the Lake 
County Board. Also, my thanks to 
the voters who voted for Robert 
Grever. I live in Lake Zurich and 
am opposed to developing. These 
builders come in, rape the land, 
make their money, and are off 
doing the same thing somewhere 
else. Why don't they go and 
develop land In Chicago where 
it's needed and leave us alone. 
It's time we take up a stand and 
give the message we're fed up 
with the developers and elected 
officials who let them rape us. 

America the ashtray 

I'm calling from the Antioch area. 
Recently, as I was driving my car 
behind two different cars, the dri- 
ver threw their cigarette butts out 
the window. It's bad enough that 
you kill yourselves smoking, but 
don't be an unsafe litterbug. Put 
It In your car ashtray, and don't 
dump the ashtray on the ground. 
Don't you have any decency and 
common sense? So much for 
America the Beautifull 

It's about time 

Bravo for the Craystakc Grade 
School OUt. -46 icVenca currlcu- 
lum commlticc, for selcalng a 

program with the most teaching 

about evolution, it's about time 
i£at grade school children foam 
the truth about where they really 
came from, and not the myth par- 
ents and churches teach. 

Help the deers 

Attention, deer hunters, hunters 
of past, present and future, and 
concerned animal activists and 
animal lovers alike. The North 
Woods deer are in dire straits 
and need immediate help. Life- 
threatening serious situations 
exist Because of excess snow 
and cold, the deer population has 
been almost cut in half. It's time 
to give back to the land and give 
respect to the deer, who need 
our support There's six weeks 
left of winter with more snow 
and cold. For more information, 
call 1-715-479-2422. You can 
write this off your taxes. 



What is it? 

What the hell is a V-chip anyway? 

Keep road blocks 

I'm calling about the idiot who 
seems to think there's illegal gam- 
bling in Fox Lake. The slot 
machines in the bars are there are 
for entertainment only and specify 
so on the machine. So Fox Lake 
and Lake County police can con- 
tinue setting up those road blocks 
to catch the drunk drivers coming 
home from those bars. 

Move away 

We are a group of seniors who 
live in Saddlebrook Farms. We 
love our community and keep our 
houses up and do all we can to be 
a quiet, no-trouble area. We've 
paid taxes all our lives and all we 
want to do is go on with our lives 
in our community. To the few 
complainers, I want to say, if you 
don't like it, move. But I know 
you wouldn't be happy anywhere. 

We enjoy it 

A Saddlebroox resident appeared 
before the Round Lake Park 
Village Board and complained 
about poor lighting and muddy 
road conditions. We and other 
residents who've lived here over 
five years ert\oy living In an adult 
c»miTiun\ty..Wo, »v,mo road* aro 

sometimes muddy due to weather 
and construction traffic. It's 

unavoidable In new develop- 



ments. To the resident who com- 
plained, If you don't like it, sell 
your house. We're sure you'll find 
many prospective buyers. 

Good and bad 

I want to brag about the Lake Villa 
St Patrick's Day parade and also 
want to complain that the Lake 
Villa Record didn't have any pic- 
tures of the parade. 
Editor's Note: Pictures appeared 
In the March 22 and March 29 
(page A6) editions. 

Reminder needed 

I'm ready to scream. What Is 
wrong with people who move Into 
a nice neighborhood and the first 
thing they do is trash it? I mean, 
having cars, boats, trailers, etc. in 
their driveways. We moved from 
Chicago because of people not 
caring about their property. The 
sad thing Is, we are unincorporat- 
ed, so his thing is he can have 
anything he wants on his properly. 
The village and police should 
remind him he can't 

Where's board? 

This is a taxpayer in the Gavin 
School District. I'd like to know 
where the Gavin School Board is 
that we voted into office to take 
care of our schools and tax dol- 
lars. It seems to me that the super- 
intendent the principal, and a 
handful of his people are running 
the district not the people we 
elected. 

Congrats, Holly! 

Congratulations to Holly Pomal 
for being honored and selected to 



work at the 1 996 Olympic Games 
in Atlanta. Your family is proud of 
youl 

Good job, Jenni 

Congratulations to Jenni Farias for 
winning the grand prize at a 
karaoke contest in Twin Lakes, 
Wisconsin! You were greatl 

Thanks, Bev 

Congratulations and thanks to 
Beverly Peroni for getting some 
justice on our side. We all 
received our checks from the 
Vikings raffle. Good job, Bev! 

Pulled a fast one 

It appears that the three bricklay- 
ers at the College of Lake County 
who put the gang symbol into the 
bricks pulled a real fast one on the 



powers to be. How can we let 
them deface our brand new build- 
ing with a picture of what they 
think is the Bulls symbol, but 
looks like something else. I think 
we should tear the wall down and 
get what we're paying for. This 
symbol shouldn't be allowed to 
stay. 

Can't be hard enough 

To the accused child molester in 
Fox Lake Vrsta, I'm sorry for the 
young victim whose life you may 
have destroyed, but I'm grateful 
you didn't choose my child as 
your victim. This would have 
destroyed my child's and my fami- 
ly's lives. I don't believe the jus- 
tice system is hard enough on 
low-life scum like yourself. 
See LIPSERVICE page C24 



MUNICIPAL AUCTION 

SAT. APRIL 20 - 10:00 AM 
INSPECTION HU« APRIL 19 - 10AM TO 4PM 

FOX LAKE MAINTENANCE YARD 

301 S.RT. 59, FOXLAKE.IL 

(BEHIND THE VILLAGE HALL) 

CONSIGNMENTS FROM TEN AREA MUNWIPALI- 
TIES INCLUDING CARS, VANS, STATION WAGON, 
PICK-UP TRUCKS, DUMP TRUCKS, CASE UNI- 
LOADER, J.D. TRACTOR, A^LIS GRADER, 
OFFICE EQUIPMENT, RADIOS, BIKES AND MUCH 

M0RE " FOR BROCHURE CALL 

OBENAUF AUCTION SERVICE, INC. 
847-587-2095 



.-^iw 



Quit Smoking 
In 60 Minutes 

Only *89 00 

No Weight Gafnl 



By Individual 

Appointment 

One Year 

Guarantee 



Call for 
Information 

356-2675 




Have You Discovered The Internet 

As Your Newest Business Tool? 



James R. Baker 

Certified 
Hypnotherapist 






^! 



**3 



ATTENTION 
HOMEOWNERS 



i From a2BedroomCape| 
Cod With I Both fo a 4 

Bedroom Cap* Cod Plus 
Attk Storage! 

ommmutomKimum 

NO MONEY DOWN! 

He sooty dowi Hmm latfoveust 

FboBdog oYoflflbU. Up fa 25 pen to 

Ipey. %l Adiftilt. No taity r wtir ti I 

CONSOllDATIYOURBIUSi | 
REMODELING INTO HOW 
MONTHLY PAYMENT! 



LET AMERICAN REMODELERS SHOW 

YOU HOW IT COSTS LESS TO 

IMPROVE THAN TO MOVE! 

DORMERS! 

OPEN & CLOSE YOUR ROOF IN ONE DAY! 



The latest stock information, Updates on 
Inventory. E-mail to a supplier in Burma. 
There are a thousand ways to use the 
Internet as a unique force in the 
manner in which yon conduct busi- 
ness today. Are you connected? 
CaU a Lakeland netDIRECT repre- 
sentative today, and ask about busi- 
ness benefits. We also offer a web 
page service to help you gain your 
presence worldwide on the Internet 
This could Just be your greatest investment 



-•«. 




N A K I 



MERICAK 

IIIM[)l)(IISIif.HIIMI I 

\ ,w,m '»•«.«.■. i Call Now... 

■ ® 1 8 00 -499 -91 49 K 



fh Lakeland netDIRECT, you'll g 

• Local Phone Call For Over 30 Prefixes 

• Unlimited Use • Chat Groups 

• News Groups • E-Mail • Flat Fee of $25 

• World Wide Web Access • Web Pages 

• Supports Up to 33.6 Modems 

• Discount Rates Available • Much More!!! 

For More Information, Call: 



E-Mail: service@lnd.com 

Visit us on the Internet 

http://wwwlnd.com 



KStDIRECT 



(847) 223-8199 



•Iceland netDIRECT offers local phone charges to most of the Lake County area. CaU for information about your prefix. 



i v 



:ViV: 



• T 



..'.■. 



'**.'Xt14r f( 



*J -M '• a ^%*» ^> ^ fu 5^^ 



1 




LIPSERVICE UktlANd Newspapers Apail 19, 1996 



LIPSERV 

It's tIhe taUc of tIhe 

Get It off youR c^est (847) 22 




TOW IN 

5-8075 




Lakeland 

Newspapers 



From page C23 

It's unanimous 

I'm from Lindenhurst and have read 
Lipservicc a few times, but haven't 
really paid much attention to it We 
stopped our subscription three years 
ago because it seemed like the edi- 
torial staff didn't know what they 
were doing. My wife picked up a 
free copy the other day and this still 
seems to be (rue. The paper said the 
township residents rallied around 
"unanimously* to support a $4.7 
million bond building. Unanimously 
doesn't mean 3,495 yes votes to 
2,224. That means it's about 3 to 2, 
not unanimous. If someone edits, 
this paper could be a lot belter. 

Time for a survey 

I believe it's time for all the news 
media and the Associated Press to 
start a survey, "Has your child been 
intimidated in school?" Has your 
daughter been asked to spend time 
with the principal after school 
because she may not pass? Recently, 
Monlel Williams on his TV show, 
did such a case. Is this prevalent in 
the Chain O' Lakes area? If the sur- 
vey was printed in the paper for stu- 
dents, I think the public would be 
surprised. Instead of a teacher's con- 
ference, the parents ought to investi- 
gate the teachers, instead of the 
other way around. 

Dome; it again 

The Clintons are doing it to us again. 
Hillary and Chelsea in spring vaca- 
tion in Bosnia and Turkey to raise 
morale for our troops? Come on, 
we're? not all that stupid and gullible 
to accept that explanation of the trip. 

Missing the boat 

I'm callingfrom Fox Lake. I think 
Lakeland Press and the other papers 
arc missing the boat The Waterway 
Agency was acquiring that property 
in Fox Lake and I remember Dr. 
Dam stating that this was a good 
deal and the agency should ouy it 
He thought it was such a good deal, 
that he said he would buy it if the 
agency didn't Since the property 
didn't appraise out, why doesn't Dr. 
Dam fork up the difference? He's the 
one that got the agency between a 
rock and a hard place. It's unfortu- 
nate that all that money was wasted 
on such a blunder. 

How embarrassing 

I'm in full agreement with an the 
callers about dictator Ken Hamsher, 
mayor of Fox Lake. How embarrass- 
ing for all of us to hear him shouting 
and treating other adults in sub- 
human ways. 

Back to grass roots 

It's good to see the grass roots poli- 
tics is alive and well in Lake County. 
The upset victories of various people 
proves thaL You must listen to the 
wishes of the people. Bob Depke 
wasn't doing that. 

In trouble again 

It seems like the Grant Twp. 
Commissioner may be in trouble 
again because he took it upon him- 
self to add fill to a wetland at the 
end of a private road to gain person- 
al access to a private lake. He used 
township resources to do it, but he 
most certainly better not use town- 
ship equipment and lime to remove 
tL By the way, will someone explain 
to the Grant Twp. officials the mean- 
ing of the word "nepotism?* 

I agree 

Amen to the person who called 
about her feelings about Vern 
Holmes. I totally agree with this per- 
son. I get tired of listening to his 
nonsense about the locarschools. 
Not only is he ignorant of the facts, 
he's just plain ignorant 

Why is it allowed? 

With regards to the illegal alien 
issue, wny are so many allowed into 
our country? Cheap labor, that's 
why. We all know as a fact that an 



illegal alien will work for very low 
wages in jobs Americans won't lake. 
True, taxes arc taken out of their 
paycheck, but are never turned in to 
the government because of invalid 
social security numbers. So the busi- 
ness pockets the deductions. 
Restaurants and landscapes are the 
biggest employers of illegals. 

Why's he so special? 

I'm a neighbor of Trustee jerry 
Metlingly and what I'm about to say 
I've seen with my own eyes. I'd like 
to know why this trustee gets special 
attention when his pipes freeze up? 
Why did the public works depart- 
ment come out to fix this when it 
wasn't their responsibility? Also, why 
did they come out to fix his frozen 
car door? Why doesn't everyone get 
the same service? I feel he should pay 
a plumber's service to the village 
since they cry broke Maybe the lime 
helping him should be spent fixing 
broken fire hydrants. Maybe the fami- 
ly that lost their home wouldn't have. 

No more protection 

The police department moving out 



We Leo me 
W/\qoN 

Has usefiil gifts and helpful 
information for you... 

ALL FREE! 

Just Engaged? New Parent? Moved? 
Ant loch 
Joretta Jan 

838-3430 395-0783 



Fox Lake/ 

Ingles Ide/ 
Spring Grove 

Jennifer Glenda 

740-3630 587-6015 



Grayslake 
Wlldwood 

Kim Linda 

566-9536 223-1607 

Gurnee 

Lori Holly 

548-8740 625-2388 



Lake Villa 
Lindenhurst 

Deanna 
265-0608 



Llbertyvllle 
Green Oaks 

Sally Donna 

680-1599 263-8339 



Long Grove 

Klldeer 

Hawthorn Woods 

Mary 
438-0287 



Mundeleln 

Karen 
566-4263 



Round Lake Area 

Pam 
546-1564 



Vernon Hills 

Doris 
680-7276 



You are entitled to a compli- 
mentary subscription from 
your hometown newspaper. 
To receive your paper, contact 
your Welcome Wagon repre- 
sentative or call Lakeland 
Newspapers at (847) 223- 
8161. For information about 
positions with the Welcome 
Wagon call Marina at (847) 
729-9817. 



to the west side means no protection 
for the east side. The park district is 
moving to the west side, so no park 
district on the east side. It's a shame. 
What's next, is the fire department 
moving, too? What is this city com- 
ing to? 

They're all critics 

I'm from Lake Villa. I completely 
agree with "Be positive,* about Vern 
Holmes and his negative attitude. 
The whole BEST organization only 
offers criticism and no constructive 
solutions to the school funding prob- 
lem. I volunteer hundreds of hours 
to the school districts and see for 
myself where money is needed. 
Thank goodness the voters in DlsL 
41 are able to think for themselves 
and not be swayed by Mr. Holmes' 
ridiculous rhetoric 

The real story 

I'm from Round Laka The real story: 
In response to the illegal alien discus- 
sion, couldn't we stop the dissention 



between us? The real concerns are; 
multi-family residency causing over- 
crowding in our schools. The real 
estate tax doesn't cover the cost of 
educating so many regardless of 
ancestry; the demands being made to 
have everything connected with the 
public bilingual. The average citizen 
cannot take any more taxes. The 
long-time residents are being forced 
out of their homes and communities 
because of it and they're angry. Part 
of the solution could be a tuition 
paid for each child not included in 
the immediate family; i.e., mom, 
dad, and the children they bore. 
Cousins, etc, would have to pay 
extra to defray the cost of education. 
And like all our forefathers who 
came to this country had to do, learn 
to speak English. America is indeed a 
melting pot where we must all get 
along. The above is only a rough 
draft, but would be a start to help 
heal the wounds to make it a lot easi- 
er for all of us to love thy neighbor. 
Village falhers, it's time to address 



this issue today. 

True colors shown 

A woman called in last week to 
respond to someone who wanted an 
Illegal alien law. She put that she 
was always taught you must gra- 
ciously look at a person for who 
they are and not for their gender, 
race or cultural background. I was 
with them up until the end, when 
ihey said, "Because of a few, you 
stereotype all Hispanlcs. How white 
of you.* I found it ironic that she 
was condemning someone else for 
being racist, ana at the end she 
showed her own racism. 

Hey, speed racer 

Mario Andretti— this is for the guy in 
the white Honda Prelude who so 
intelligently tried to race a Mustang 
5.0 at 3 a.m. You know the reason 
why you pulled away from me, 
don't you? Here's a hint— cops at 
the gas station waiting for a loser to 
drive like a moron. Enjoy the tickets! 



Looking for 

higher rate checking 

and savings? 

\buVe turned to 

the right page. 





MANAGEMENT 
CHECKING 



.00 



% 

m 



Cash Management 
Checking. 

Higher interest on higher balances. 

Unlimited check-writing. 

APY based on $25,000 balance. 






First of America m 




v*mB?nrF*ini^ First of America 
Conn8ctK ^ Connections Savings. 

0/ 

/o Get high rate savings when you have at 

^PY least one other First of America account 

$1,000 minimum opening deposit 



Fully liquid Risk free. 

Visit any First of America office or call 
l-800-222-4FOAto open your account by mail. 



0- FIRST°F AMERICA Bank 



Annual Percentage Yields (Al*Ys) accurate as of 4/6/96 and subject to change without notice after account opening. Fees may 

reduce earnings. Tlie interest rate for the portion of the Cask Management Checking balance above $5,000 is tied to the weekly average 

Fed Funds Hate less not more than one percent, which, as of 4/6/96, is 4.61%. Tlie portion of the balance $5,000 and below earns 

an interest rate determined by the bank, which, as of 4/6/96, is 1. 15%. Tlie APY ranges from 1. 16% to 4.53% on $100,000. 

Available to individuals at First of America Hank-Illinois only. Member FDIC. &1996, FOA Hank Corporation. 

If hearing impaired, TDD line available from 9-5 KSTat (800) 289-4614. h 



7 



I 



Apail 19, 1996 bOsUnd Newspapers BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



Cash Station leaves choice to banks 



Cash Station Inc. announced 
that Its board of directors has 
voted to permit its financial insti- 
tutions members to determine 
Individually whether they wish to 
impose ATM surcharges on cash 
withdrawals. 

A "surcharge" is an ATM 
usage fee Imposed by an ATM 
owner on customers of another 
financial Institution. It is different 
from a fee that might be charged 
by a financial institution to its 
own customer for using the sys- 
tem. The board's action was 
taken in response to the recent 
decisions of Visa and 
MasterCard, the operators of the 
national ATM networks, to elimi- 
nate their bans on ATM sur- 
charges. 

Cash Station's rule change 



will take effect July 1, 1996. After 
that date, surcharges will com- 
mence only at those Cash Station 
ATMs whose owners elect to 
impose them, 

The Cash Station network and 
the major national ATM net- 
works — Cirrus and Plus— histori- 
cally had prohibited member 
financial institutions from 
imposing surcharges except 
where permitted by law In 15 
states. As of April 1, 1996, both 
Plus and Cirrus began to permit 
members to collect a surcharge 
on cash ATM transactions of cus- 
tomers with cards issued by U.S. 
financial Institutions. 

The Cash Station board acted 
to rescind the prohibition in the 
face of competitive realities. 
Because Cirrus or Plus financial 



institutions are free to impose 
surcharges and most Cash 
Station cards work In those 
machines, the prohibition would 
not have protected Cash Station 
cardholders from ATM owner 
fees. 

The action taken by the Cash 
Station board will not necessarily 
result in the widespread advent 
of ATM surcharges. Each individ- 
ual ATM owner will decide on Its 
own whether to assess surcharges 
and will be accountable to the 
consumers' ability to "vote with 
their feet" and use ATMs with no 
surcharges. The prohibition was 
lifted only for withdrawals; Cash 
Station rules continue to prohibit 
ATM surcharges for deposits, bal- 
ance inquiries and transfers 
between accounts. 



Lakehurst mall marks 
its silver anniversary 



Lakehurst Shopping 

Center will celebrate 25 years 
this month and the public Is 
invited to join in the anniver- 
sary festivities April 20. 

Customers who arrive 
early will have the opportunity 
to enjoy free coffee and mini 
buns from Clnnabon while 
supplies last, said Marketing 
Assistant Alicia Moore. 

The center will also cele- 
brate by offering patrons a 
special discount 

"Everyone who brings 
store receipts totaling $100 or 
more will receive a 10 percent 



rebate on their total pur- 
chase," Moore explained. 

The celebration will also 
share a bit of history with visi- 
tors. "We're having a historical 
photo display from our 
archives," she added. Entitled 
"Then and Now," the display 
will be In the center court 

"We'll also have the Show 
Biz Kidz from the Talent 
Forum In Libcrtyville," said 
Moore. "They will perform on 
the center stage at 1 and 3 p.m. 
For more Information on 
special activities call 473- 
0235,— by SUZJE REED 



BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE K" 1 






I 



. . "*.; ' '.-. 




"*>(«** ■ 




Fast food 
for charity 

Wendy's customers can 
give a helping hand to 
non-profit groups 
RAGE €2 

Transportation 



:>■: 



v - 



-'-'Check out Wheel Deals 

for the latest in 
(hiving data 
i*GEG9 




ers 
responses 

Callers share opinions 
on community news I'in- 

PAGEC25 



nr 



a 





' Company Price Change Divr. 

Abbou 41 ;J;-i;3/a' >6jm ■ 

Allstate 391/2 -13/4 $0.78^ 
Amerltech 56 1/2 +2 3/4- $2,00 
AT&T 62 +11/2 $1.32 
Baxter 431/4-7/8 SL73 
;Brunswick 22 1/2-3/8 $0,50 
Unicom 27 -3/8 : $1.60 
D. Witter 521/2 -U/2 $0.64 
McDonalds 48 5/8 +r3/8 $0.27 
Motorola 58 1/4 +6 1/2 $0.40 
Peoples En. 31 -1/8 $1.80 
Qkr. Oats 327/8 -1/8 $1.14 
SaraLee 315/8 -1/2 $0.68 
Sears 531/2 +53/8 $0.92 
UAL 215 -17/8 v $0.00 

Walgroens 31 5/8 -7/8 $0.39 
WMXTcch/34 +7/8 $0.60 
Cherry Bee, 9 3/B -1/4 $0.00 
Brwn. Ferris 30 7/8 -3/4 $0.68 

Motorola soared over 10 per- 
cent as earnings came In better 
than expected, but warned next 
couple of quarters might be 
rough. 

Stock Watch provided by 
Noah Seidenberg of Edward D. 

Jones & Co., Gray slake. 



Flatlander's brewpub celebrates the Midwest 



SUZIE REED 

Staff Reporter 

Amid the whine of power 
saws and the roar of graders, the 
owners of Flatlander's are 
preparing to serve up their first 
glasses of mlcro-brcwed beer 
next week. 

Drivers along Milwaukee Ave. 
have watched the first tenant of 
the Village Green take shape at 
Oldc Half Day Rd. in 
Lincolnshire. The building 
reveals the undeniable influence 
of the prairie style of Frank Lloyd 
Wright, a response to the excess- 
es of the Victorian era reflecting 
the essence of simple 
Midwestern values, said partner 
arid Brcwmaster Rick Westervelt 

"The whole theme is very 
Midwestern, the 'Flatlander's' 
work ethic, architecture and cui- 
sine,'' he explained. The things 
we have to have we will make 
beautiful; we will focus on the 
things that have to be here, and 
pay attention to details." 

Westervelt, along with 
President John Jacobs and 
Operations Manager Lance Bell, 
began to plan for the restaurant 
more than a year ago. 

"We didn't have a name or 
know where we were going to put 
it," said Westervelt With $3 mil- 
lion from 35 private investors, 
they began construction in 
February, with 60 workers on the 
site every day. Flatlander's will be 
the first official building in 
"downtown" Lincolnshire, " he 
said. 

The brewpub will feature a 
tap room that the owners see as a 
"community gathering spot," 
with round pub tables, cozy 
booths, board games, and a stage 
where entertainment will include 
bands from Austin, Texas. Behind 
the stage is a glass wall protecting 
the storage tanks, "where the fin- 
ished beer lives," said Westervelt. 

"We will focus on letting peo- 
ple see the brewery," he said. "We 
are very proud that we can bring 
a very unique product to our cus- 
tomers. We want to reeducate 
people about the different types 
of beer." 

In order to allow customers to 
experience the various tastes, 
Flatlander's will not only offer a 
sampler tray featuring six 4- 
ouncc glasses, they will also give 




Mark Duchow, head brewer, and Rick Westervelt, brew master, stack the European grains from 
Scotland, England and Belgium that are used to make beer at Flatlander's brewpub.— Photo by Linda 
Chapman 



out free sample "splashes" to 
those who just want a taste to 
make up their mind which to 
order. The menu will offer six 
standard brews and one or two 
specials. 

"We want to make sure peo- 
ple buy what they arc going to 
consume," said Westervelt "We 
want people to enjoy them- 
selves." 

At Flatlander's, European 
grains (malted barley and wheat) 
from Scotland, England and 
Belgium steeped In sugar water 
and poured through an Italian fil- 
ter. Then they arc combined with 
hops (flowering spices) and put 
in large fermentation tanks where 
they can be seen from outside, 
even at night, when spotlights 
will Illuminate the area. Mike 
Duchow of Chicago is the head 
brewer. 

The serving tanks, with a 
capacity of 30 kegs, arc located 
near the entrance in a long lobby 
that features a residential setting 



at one end. Morris chairs and 
prairie style tables and lamps share 
the area with prints of old beer ads. 
"It's the heart of the place," 
said Westervelt The dining room, 
he said is the "jewel of the whole 
building," a place where families 
can sit down and enjoy a meal. A 
double-sided fireplace also 
serves a private meeting room 
that could be used as a smoking 
section on busy nights, said 
Westervelt Great attention has 
been paid to detail throughout 



the building, with all the lights, 
booths and carpet designed 
along the prairie theme. 

"There is a big focus on mak- 
ing this place very operational 
and functional," he said. 

A beer garden will allow 
patrons to enjoy meals outdoors. 
A hearth oven will produce beer 
and cheese bread. "Bread is like 
beer," quipped Westervelt "You 
just use a lot less water!" 

The kitchen will be under the 
Sec FLATLANDER'S page C2 



Home Builders set Arbor Day program 

The Home Builders Association of Lake County (HBALC) 
announces its 1996 Arbor Day Celebration April 20 through 20. 
Sponsored by Sciglc's Home & Building Center, HBALC participating 
builder-members will distribute six to 12-inch seedlings to the first 
200 visitors at specific model/spec home sites. 

The association will also be hosting tree-planting ceremonies and 
educational programs at a number of Lake County elementary 
schools. The school programs are being sponsored by Hendrickscn, 
The Care of Trees. 

For information on participating builders or to learn about the 
Arbor Day Celebration and other HBALC programs, call 816-4663. 



— ..--.,. 



_i-_ 




BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE UVtM Newspapers Apail 19, 1996 






Wendy's franchises support not-for-profit organizations 



The Lagniappc Group, the 
largest Wendy's franchisee in the 
northern suburbs, is directly con- 
tributing to the bottom line of 
more than 85 Lake County chari- 
ties and not-for-profit organiza- 
tions. The Lagniappc Group 
enhanced its fund raising pro- 
gram, the 'Your Choice Card.™" 

When customers present a 
Tour Choice Card" at any of the 
five Lagniappc Group Wendy's, 
the company donates a mini- 
mum of 5 percent of their total 
sale to the customers' designated 
Lake County charity or not-for- 
profit of choice. As an added 
donation incentive, Lagniappc 
will contribute 15 percent of each 
dinner order and all day Sunday 
orders to the Lake County organi- 
zations. 

Quarterly, the Lagniappc 
Group mails checks to each regis- 
tered charity and not for profit 
organization. The largest recipi- 
ents of donations in the most 
recent pay-out were: 

Northpointc Achievement Center 
(Zion), Reach Bible Church 
(Zion), and Wesley Church 
(Waukegan). 



The Northpointc Achieve 
ment Center in Zion received 
the highest number of contri- 
butions. Sally Gaca, Grant 
Writer, reported that she used 
the first Your Choice Card 
check to hold a Christmas party 
for Northpointc clients and 
successive checks will be used 
for a variety of activities. "I'm 
promoting this program every- 
where; to my staff, board of 
directors and in our newslet- 
ter," she said. 

Steve Kemp, treasurer of 
Zion's Beach Bible Church, is 
equally impressed. "We are 
absolutely thrilled by the con- 
cept," he said. "We arc earmark- 
ing all Your Choice Card funds for 
the new playground that we have 
wanted to build here at the 
church," he added. 

Wendy's customers and 
organizations can sign up to par- 
ticipate in the "Your Choice 
Card" program at any of the 
Lagniappc Group Wendy's 
restaurants located at Route 60 
& Lakcvicw, Vernon Hills; 2560 
Skokie Highway, Highland Park; 
2110 Green Bay Road, North 



Chicago; 2005 Lewis Avenue, 

Waukegan; 3400 Sheridan Road, 

Zion; 

or call 407-3400 for application 

forms. 

For a nominal fee, partici- 
pants In the Your Choice Card 
program will receive a. magneti- 



cally-encoded card (much like a 
credit card). Their name and the 
not-for-profit group;s name is 
embossed on the card. Whenever 
a participant visits a Lagniappc 
Wendy's in Lake County, an 
employee will slide the Your 
Choice Card through a specially- 



designed register. Every three 
months, the charities and not- 
for-profit organizations will auto- 
matically receive a check. It is 
Lagnlappc's hope that with ever 
expanding membership and 
patronage to increase the amount 
of donations every three months. 



*%FR£SH,QlRLITY 



Clark acquires 10 outlets 



Clark USA, Inc., through its 
subsidiary Clark Refining & 
Marketing, Inc., announced that 
it has acquired 10 retail gasoline 
and convenience stores from Bell 
Fuels, Inc. of Chicago, which 
operated under the name of Road 
Pilot/Road Pantry. 

"This acquisition is an inte- 
gral part of Clark's aggressive 
strategy to grow in the Chicago 
area," said Brandon Barnholt, 
chief operating officer and execu- 
tive vice president of marketing. 
These high volume outlets com- 
plement our existing assets and 
assist us in achieving our market 
share goals." 

The 10 locations are in the 



west and northwest suburbs of 
Chicago, and alone represent 
32 million gallons of gasoline 
sold per year to drivers in the 
Chicago metropolitan area. 
This is enough gasoline to fill- 
up every car in the City of 
Chicago. 

The company first initiated 
its strategic marketing plan to 
grow when It completed the 
acquisition of 35 retail gasoline 
and convenience stores located 
throughout the Northwest sub- 
urbs of Chicago from State Oil 
Co. of Grayslake last year. 

The acquisition indudes a loca- 
tion at 301 Town Line Rd. in 
Mundclein, 








Vi 



■ - .Ski ■- ' ~-^/- - ■ J ^^FtV*' " r 



Arlene Demb (left), director of development for Norfhpointe Achievement Center, and grant writer 
Sally Gaca (r.ght) accept a Tour Choice Card" check from Kathy Delaney, general manager of the 
Wendy's restaurant in Zion. , 



Have You Discovered The Internet 

As Your Newest Business Tool? 



kA 



Flatlander's 

From page CI 

direction of Chef Rob Macey, who 
comes to Flatlander's from 1776 
In Crystal Lake. 

Many of the dishes and 
accompanying sauces are cooked 
with ale from the Flatlander's 
tanks. 

Ribs are topped with Harvest 
Amber BBQ sauce; bratwurst is 
boiled in the ale. The menu 
includes something for any 
appetite, with soups, salads, 
entrees, sandwiches, pasta and 
burgers. 

Appetizers feature favorites as 
well as unique taste treats. 
Flatlander's Sampler offers spicy 
sausages, Wisconsin cheese, a 
baked pretzel and sauerkraut In 
addition to the six standard beers 
(Olde Orchard Ale, Prairie Wheat 
Beer, Harvest Amber Ale, 80 
Shilling Ale, Abe's Honest Ale, 
and Locomotive Stout), 
Flatlander's offers more than 30 
different wines. 

A non-alcoholic beer Is avail- 
able, as is Flatlander's draught 
rootbecr. 

More than 150 employees 
have joined the Flatlander's 
endeavor and arc undergoing rig- 
orous training. In keeping with 
the Midwestern work ethic, the 
restaurant offers insurance bene- 



fits and vacations to their work- 
ers. 

The restaurant will be open 
for lunch and dinner, with lun- 
cheon hours from 11 a.m. to 2:30 
p.m. Monday through Friday, 
and noon to 4 p.m. on weekends. 
Dinner is served from 4:30 to 
10:30 p.m. Monday through 
Thursday, 4 to 11 p.m. Friday and 
Saturday, and 4:30 to 10 p.m. 
Sunday. A children's menu is 
available. 

Flatlander's will offer patrons 
a sneak preview of the restaurant 
during a special benefit to help 
the Riverside Foundation, a facil- 
ity for mentally handicapped 
adults in Lincolnshire. 

From 5 to 8 p.m. April 21, the 
restaurant will offer a sampling of 
all their menu items and beers 
for a donation of $15 for adults. 
This is a family event; teens can 
enjoy the evening for $10, those 
younger than 12 will be admitted 
free. 

The restaurant will have at 
least four units in the 
Chicagoland area by the end of 
next year, said Dan Friedlander, 
public relations contact for 
Flatlander's. 

For information on the 
restaurant or the fund raiser call 
821-1234. 






The latest stock information. Updates on 
Inventory. E-mail to a supplier in Burma. 
There are a thousand ways to use the 
Internet as a unique force In the 
manner In which you conduct busi- 
ness today. Are you connected? 
Call a Lakeland netDIRECT repre- 
sentative today, and ask about busi- 
ness benefits. We also offer a web 
page service to help you gain your 
presence worldwide on the Internet 
This could just be your greatest investment 



.... 



With Lakeland netDIRECT, youll get. 

• Local Phone Call For Over 30 Prefixes 

• Unlimited Use • Chat Groups 

• News Groups • E-Mail • Flat Fee of $25 

• World Wide Web Access • Web Pages 

• Supports Up to 33.6 Modems 

• Discount Rates Available • Much More!!! 

For More Information, Call: 

E-Mail: service@lnd.com 

Visit us on the Internet 
http://wwwind.com 

•Lakeland netDIRECT offers local phone charges to most of the Lake County area. Call for information about your prefix. 



Ell 



(847) 223-8199